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2017 Program

2017 Program
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Welcome From

Professor Philippa Levy
Pro Vice-Chancellor (Student Learning)

Welcome to the 2017 Festival of Learning and Teaching! The theme for the seventh Festival of Learning and Teaching is Digital Futures/Digital Capabilities: Design. Create. Transform. The future of higher education learning and teaching is digital, flexible and personalised - whether in blended or fully online modes. Digital technologies will continue to disrupt traditional educational models and practices, bringing exciting new opportunities for creativity and innovation for educators and universities seeking to provide higher education that is profoundly relevant, engaging and transformative. At the same time, higher education that is focused on student success must respond to current, predicted and unpredictable digital disruptions in wider work and society. This challenges us to find new ways of connecting academic discipline learning with opportunities for students to develop the digital capabilities that are becoming so fundamental to graduate employability across all sectors.

Some of the questions we will be exploring are:

  • What works? What kinds of blended and online learning activities and assessments are proving effective in different discipline areas?
  • How can we leverage new technology to enrich and deepen learning and teaching experiences?
  • What are the outcomes for students of innovations in the use of digital technologies, for example in SGDE, flipped learning?
  • What new opportunities does our new MyUni environment (Canvas and Echo360) offer students and staff? How can it support active, collaborative and discovery-oriented approaches to learning?
  • How can learning analytics features accessed through MyUni help educators design effective learning activities and support students?
  • What digital capabilities do students need for academic success but also for future employability?
  • How can we most effectively develop students’ digital capabilities through the curriculum and in co-curricular and extra-curricular activities?
  • How can students and staff partner with each other to develop digital capabilities and create new approaches to technology- enhanced learning?
  • How can flexibility and personalisation be provided for students through the use of digital approaches, while also maintaining connection and community?
  • What are we learning from MOOC-making that can be used for our ‘mainstream’ learning and teaching?

This year, we will also be launching the University’s new Digital Capabilities Framework, which has been created to support development of our students’ digital capabilities as well as to support staff in their skills development, as well as celebrating the 25th Anniversary of the Maths Learning Centre.

The Festival is an opportunity to celebrate our experiences as both teachers and learners at the University of Adelaide, to showcase innovations, to share evidence, ideas and practical tips, and to debate issues and challenges. I wish all participants an inspiring, motivating and enjoyable day.

Program of Events

Program of Events - Festival of Learning and Teaching 2017
Time Mins Session
8.30am 30 Registration opens
(8:30–9:30am) Horace Lamb Foyer next to Horace Lamb 1022 Lecture Theatre
(9:30am onwards) Ingkarni Wardli Atrium
9.00am 5 Interim Vice-Chancellor's Opening Remarks
Professor Mike Brooks, Interim Vice-Chancellor and President
Horace Lamb Lecture Theatre 1022, Horace Lamb
9.05am 10 Welcoming address
Professor Philippa Levy, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Student Learning)
Horace Lamb Lecture Theatre 1022, Horace Lamb
9.15am 45 Keynote
Leading Digital Transformation for Better Outcomes, Professor Belinda Tynan, Deputy Vice Chancellor and Vice-President (Education), RMIT University
Horace Lamb Lecture Theatre 1022, Horace Lamb
10.00am 30 Morning Tea
Ingkarni Wardli Atrium
10.30am 5 Move to Parallel Sessions
Room 1
B17, Basement, Ingkarni Wardli
Room 2
B18, Basement, Ingkarni Wardli
Room 3
2052, level 2, Barr Smith South
Room 4
422, level 4, Horace Lamb
Oral Presentations
10.35am 30 The use of Learning Analytics to gain feedback to feed-forward in MOOC designs
Karina Riggs
Flipping and Inquiring in Public Law
Matthew Stubbs
Digital futures in research supervision: The Doctoral Writing blog
Cally Guerin
Smart Casual: Using online modules to build teacher confidence and skills
Anne Hewitt
11.10am 30 Evidence Based Decision
Making: using Learning
Analytics Data to improve insight and actionable
effective change
Travis Cox and David Wilson
Flipping Three Ways: Engaging Undergraduates and Academics through Creative Use of Technology in the Flipped Classroom
Hayley McGrice
Peer2Peer Co-Creation
Revision Resource Tools to engage and support second year Anatomical
Science students
Daniel Gutschmidt
My Digital Ongoing Journey: Comparing Laws in a Blended Learning Environment
Jessica
Viven-Wilksch
Roundtable discussions
11.45am 45 Student Digital
Experience Survey
Judith Bailey
Active learning in lectures: perspectives on using Echo360 ALP for learning in lecture theatres
Colleen Ortega
Through the Looking Glass: Staff perspectives of being a learner at the University of Adelaide
Edward Palmer
Diversity and Inclusion in the Digital Futures
Claudia Szabo
12.30pm 30 Lunch and Exhibition of Festival Posters – Ingkarni Wardli Atrium
1.00pm 90 Byte Size Bazaar
Please drop in to the following stations at your own leisure and experience some of our digital learning and teaching technologies and resources, and meet with some key staff and groups who can support you in your learning and teaching development. Descriptions for each station can be found on the Festival Events page (please click on the title of interest).
Communities of Practice groups
Lounge, Learning Innovations Studio, level 3, Barr Smith South
(please note that the Learning Analytics Communities of Practice group will be in The Cog, level 7, Kenneth Wills)

The Communities of Practice groups provide an opportunity for staff and students to come together on a regular basis to discuss topics of strategic relevance to the institution, and to deepen their knowledge and expertise. Come along to the Learning Innovation Studio to find out more about each of the groups, including:

Career Readiness 2.0, Wayne Errington
Diversity and Inclusion in Teaching, Laura Grenfell
eLearning, Jessica Viven-Wilksch
Flipped Classroom, Hayley McGrice
Learning Analytics (The Cog, level 7, Kenneth Wills), David Wilson
Small Group Discovery Experience (SGDE), Catherine Snelling and Beth Loveys
Student Engagement, Edward Palmer, Ben Chandler and Sandra Popovich
Digital Capabilities @ Adelaide: how the Framework affects you
Judith Bailey and Jamie Royals
Meeting room, Learning Innovation Studio, level 3, Barr Smith South
Interested in Innovative Filming Approaches to Blended Learning? A Showcase of Lightboard, Green-screen and LiveKey Technologies for Medical Teaching
Nicolene Lottering
Video Editing Suite, Learning Innovations Studio, level 3, Barr Smith South
Feeling blue? Come and try the green screen!
Trisha Franceschilli and Dave Johnson
Recording Studio, level 2, Barr Smith Library
Virtual Reality Hands-on demonstration
Frank Donnelly
Level 2, Barr Smith Library
High Fidelity Patient Simulator
Adam Montagu and Libby Kentish
Room 422, Level 4, Horace Lamb
Dental Simulation Labs
Lucy Ludlow
room 1041a, Level 1, Barr Smith South
Learning Analytics – Exploring data together
Daniel Barry, Marziah Zarazillah and John Murphy
The Cog, level 7, Kenneth Wills
2.30pm 5 Move to Parallel Sessions
    Room 1
B17, Basement, Ingkarni Wardli
Room 2
B18, Basement, Ingkarni Wardli
PechaKuchas
2.35pm-
3.45pm
 70 Towards digitally savvy higher degree researchers
Ainsley Painter
Using a Self-Directed Memory Tool to Improve and Track Student Performance
Bernard Evans
Breeding, and the Bard: Co-creation of learning experiences on the global scale
Alison Ogilvie
A technology mix-tape: Learning to love teaching via video conferencing using a flipped approach and MyUni
Dayle Soong
The Role of Modern Media Consumption Platforms in Student-centred Learning
Martin Basic
Meditation on the screen? The history of teaching mindfulness online
Pedro Henrique Ribeiro Santiago
Lights, Camera, Action! Using Animations in Learning & Teaching
Philip Elms
Improving student writing with the software Grammarly
John Tibby
Use of annotated and interactive videos to teach histology
Viythia Katharesan
Online Video Content - A Substitute for or a Complement to the Face-to-Face Lecture?
Mark Dodd
Supporting and developing staff and student engagement with Small Group Discovery Experience (SGDE) via a curated repository of student work in Canvas
Joy McEntee
Working with blended learners in Maths
Angela Di Sotto-Hames
The Canvas Community: Getting the best out of Canvas
Geraint Draheim
Digital capabilities for researchers in the 21st century
Judith Bailey
Discussion time Discussion time
3.45pm 30 Afternoon Tea Ingkarni Wardli Atrium
4.15pm 5 Move to Keynote
4.20pm 30 Keynote
Rewiring the University: digital anxieties and digital dreams, Helen Beetham, Consultant, JISC (Joint Information’s Systems Committee)
Horace Lamb Lecture Theatre 1022, Horace Lamb
4.50pm 10 Closing Remarks
Professor Pascale Quester, Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Vice-President (Academic)
Horace Lamb Lecture Theatre 1022, Horace Lamb
5.00pm 60 Drinks and Scavenger Hunt Prize Presentation
Mezzanine, Level 5, Hub Central
6.00pm - Festival Concludes

Additional activity: Maths Learning Centre 25th Anniversary Celebrations
Maths Learning Centre, Level 3, Hub Central
This year the Festival of Learning and Teaching will fall on the same date as the 25th Anniversary of the Maths Learning Centre. Please feel free to join in the celebration activities in the Maths Learning Centre from 6.00pm.

Keynotes

Professor Belinda Tynan, Deputy Vice Chancellor and Vice-President (Education), RMIT University

Belinda TynanPrior to joining RMIT Belinda was the Pro Vice-Chancellor of Learning and Teaching Innovation at the Open University, UK. In that role she provided executive leadership in the areas of learning and teaching innovation. Her previous roles have included Pro Vice-Chancellor Learning, Teaching and Quality at the University of Southern Queensland, and Director of the research centre DEHub at the University of New England.

Professor Tynan holds an EdD from the University of Western Australia, a MEd in online learning from the University of Southern Queensland, three Post Graduate Diploma’s one in Secondary Education (ACU); Curriculum (UniMelb) and Higher Education (UNSW). Her Bachelor of Arts was completed at the University of Melbourne in history, music and drama.

Professor Tynan’s research interests are concentrated in the field of educational technologies, academic workload, student voices and academic professional development. She has 70+ refereed publications and is a frequently invited guest and keynote-speaker and facilitator. You can find her work on ResearchGate.

Belinda has more than thirty years of experience in the education sector in Australia, New Zealand, Singapore and the UK. She is a Principal Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and a Fellow of the European Distance Education Network.

Belinda has also held a number of International and National Leadership roles. She is on the editorial board of two major journals, until recently a non-executive director of the Executive Committee of the European Distance Education Network (EDEN) and FutureLearn (UK); on the board of the Menzies Centre at Kings College, London. She additionally holds a two year appointment as a member of the Polytechnic Quality Assurance Framework (PQAF) External Review Panel for the Ministry of Education, Singapore.

Helen Beetham, Digital Education Consultant, JISC (Joint Information's Systems Committee)

Helen BeethamHelen is a UK-based writer, researcher and adviser on e-learning issues and a regular keynote speaker. As a long-standing consultant to the Jisc e-learning programme, she has written influential reports on e-learning, digital literacy, open education and digital organisations. Helen was a member of the UK Government's Beyond Current Horizons programme on educational futures and has led futures thinking initiatives for a number of global universities and national bodies. She has developed Grand Challenges in European TEL research, and worked on projects in Europe, Africa and Australia. Most recently she has been working on the expectations and experiences of today's 'digital students', speaking on the digital future of work, and designing a digital capabilities framework for use across education and healthcare. Helen's co-authored volume Rethinking Pedagogy for a Digital Age (Routledge: third edition forthcoming) is a standard text in digital education. Tweets @helenbeetham. Blogs (currently) at digitalstudent.jiscinvolve.org, digitalcapability.jiscinvolve.org and www.helenbeetham.com.

Abstracts

  • Presentation Abstracts
    Principal Author Title
    Cox, Travis and Wilson, David Evidence Based Decision Making: using Learning Analytics Data to improve insight and actionable effective change
    Guerin, Cally Digital futures in research supervision: The DoctoralWriting blog
    Gutschmidt, Daniel Peer2Peer Co-Creation Revision Resource Tools to engage and support second year Anatomical Science students
    Hewitt, Anne Smart Casual: Using online modules to build teacher confidence and skills
    McGrice, Hayley Flipping Three Ways: Engaging Undergraduates and Academics through Creative Use of Technology in the Flipped Classroom
    Riggs, Karina The use of Learning Analytics to gain feedback to feed-forward in MOOC designs
    Stubbs, Matthew Flipping and Inquiring in Public Law
    Viven-Wilksch, Jessica My Digital Ongoing Journey: Comparing Laws in a Blended Learning Environment

    Evidence Based Decision Making: using Learning Analytics Data to improve insight and actionable effective change

    Principal Presenters
    David Wilson, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
    Travis Cox, Division of Academic and Student Engagement

    Abstract
    Learning analytics affords insight into the specific learning and teaching behaviours associated with the most favourable learning outcomes. Embedding actionable learning analytics into the curriculum design enables real time evidence based decision making for both students and teachers. This interactive presentation will actively engage participants with the learning analytics available in Canvas and the Echo360 Active Learning Platform.

    Evidence based decision making enables modification of learning and teaching practices associated with improved student outcome, without needing to wait for SELTs as the only quantitative measure. Change can be effected during the teaching period, or even during a single class.

    This session explores practical connections between learning analytics and learning design, identified through Canvas and Echo, and further data exploration through the Learning Analytics project. A diversity of pedagogic data including formative and summative assessments, and learning preferences in specifics contexts, will be presented and discussed. In addition to discussing data from individual courses we will explore common and disparate patterns of delivery and student engagement. There is value in being mindful of inclusion and diversity; it is clear that no one size nor practice fits all.

    Digital futures in research supervision: The DoctoralWriting blog

    Principal Presenter
    Cally Guerin, Faculty of Arts

    Abstract
    Pressures in the ‘accelerated academy’ (Carrigan 2015) to workfaster with more students and fewer institutional supports have changed pedagogical practices at all levels, including in research supervision. As we move into the digital futures of research supervision, social media offers possibilities for new ways of expanding the reach and quality of academic support.

    Academic developers, literacy specialists, HDRs and their supervisors seek out resources and communities through digital networks to access reliable information about researcher education. Reputable scholars have established a number of long-term academic blogs focused on the issues around postgraduate supervision.

    This presentation reflects on one such blog, DoctoralWriting, a crossinstitutional, multi-authored blog that explores all aspects of research writing relevant to doctoral students. The blog has a worldwide readership and has published regularly since its inception in 2012. Originally the intended audience was the language and literacy specialists and writing teachers who work with doctoral candidates; however, we have found that students and their supervisors make up the majority of readers (Guerin, Aitchison & Carter 2015). The blog has become a hub in the network of online resources supporting doctoral students, connecting a community of scholars and practitioners (Guerin, Carter, Aitchison 2016).

    Carrigan, M. (4 July 2015) Life in the accelerated academy. The London School of Economics and Political Science, Social Sciences Impact Blog.

    Guerin C., Aitchison C., & Carter S. (2016) Networks, nodes and knowledge: Blogging to support doctoral candidates and supervisors.

    In M. Fourie-Malherbe, R. Albertyn, C. Aitchison & E. Bitzer (eds), Postgraduate supervision: future foci for the knowledge society. 269-282. SUN Press, Stellenbosch.

    Guerin, C., Carter, S. & Aitchison, C. (2015) Blogging as learning community: Lessons for academic development?

    International Journal for Academic Development. 20(3): 212-223.
    DOI:10.1080/136014 4X.2015.1042480.

    Peer2Peer Co-Creation Revision Resource Tools to engage and support second year Anatomical Science students

    Principal Presenter
    Daniel Gutschmidt, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

    Co-Presenters
    Bonnie Williams, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
    Lauren Gauci, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
    Madeleine Bessen, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
    Marie Porter, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
    Nicole Williams, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
    Nicolene Lottering, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

    Abstract
    Based on 2016 eSELT data, students found the threshold learning concept associated with human anatomy difficult to master. Content can be perceived as being extremely difficult due to the large volume of knowledge, challenging terminology and unfamiliar study techniques. Candidates of the Peer2Peer Alliance in Anatomy Program, constituting past high-achieving students of ANATSC2009 Musculoskeletal Anatomy, aimed to combat these issues by supporting students to develop efficient learning strategies and organizational skills, and foster a sense of belonging within university culture.

    To supplement course material delivery and pedagogy, Peer2Peer leaders partnered to create a selection of digital learning technologies to address the spectrum of learning styles that students employ, including: (1) “MSK Snapchat” for kinaesthetic learners; (2) “Student’s Guide to Anatomy” Podcast Series for aural; and (3) “Prezi” case studies for visual. Further, co-creators aimed to promote the notion of a positive learning environment that was “outside the classroom” - colloquially advertised to students as “study without studying”. The goal was to determine if these implemented digital tools had a discernible positive impact on learning outcomes and overall academic results in the course. Resulting analytics demonstrated a high engagement rate across all technologies, with over 410 students subscribed to the Snapchat account, 390 website views recorded for the Podcast channel, and over 100 students accessing the Prezi case study since their commencement in April 2017. Student feedback through survey responses further demonstrated that 80% believe these tools aided to and/or improved their learning performance. Together, these digital resources reflect the efficacy of adapting technology to engage students with different learning preferences.

    The Peer2Peer Alliance in Anatomy Program has helped improve academic and social outcomes within anatomy courses and established a foundation for application into other university faculties and courses.

    Smart Casual: Using online modules to build teacher confidence and skills

    Principal Presenter
    Anne Hewitt, Faculty of the Professions

    Co-Presenters
    Alex Steel, University of New South Wales
    Kate Galloway, Bond University
    Mark Israel, Flinders University
    Mary Heath, Flinders University
    Natalie Skead, University of Western Australia

    Abstract
    Legal educators in Australia are often experts in law without the same degree of expertise in teaching. University-wide resources to develop teaching skills are often generic and not targeted to the specific issues that can arise in the law classroom, and many sessional staff don’t have access even to these.

    Many law schools struggle to find the resources needed to support the creation and delivery of discipline-specific professional development for sessional staff. This leaves a significant proportion of the tertiary teaching workforce marginalised in their own workplaces, unable to access support that better paid staff take for granted and correspondingly limited in their capacity to develop their teaching skills, future work prospects and job satisfaction.

    This situation places at risk the capacity of sessional staff to deliver the high-quality learning experiences all of us seek for our students.

    Smart Casual https://smartlawteacher.org/ is an innovative online response, designed to meet the needs of sessional staff through the use of a peer-to-peer approach to creating resources that are constantly available, time-efficient and self-paced. These resources include a variety of instructional materials, tips and links as well as videos of sessional teachers speaking about their own teaching. The modules have been peer reviewed and tested by sessional staff from a variety of institution types and locations. Smart Casual’s suite of nine interactive professional development modules has been designed as a self-directed professional development resource for use by sessional teachers on a just-in-time basis.

    While focused on Australian law classrooms, many of the issues in the modules are broadly relevant. This session will provide an overview of the format of the modules and the types of content covered, and will invite comment and discussion on how the modules can be adapted to assist in building teacher capacity in different disciplines.

    Flipping Three Ways: Engaging Undergraduates and Academics through Creative Use of Technology in the Flipped Classroom

    Principal Presenter
    Hayley McGrice, Faculty of Sciences

    Co-Presenters
    Beth Loveys, Faculty of Sciences
    Sophie Karanicolas, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

    Abstract
    The Flipped Classroom is a contemporary learning and teaching strategy that is associated with individual pre-class learning and group based-learning in-class. Educational literature acknowledges that teaching students who are prepared for class encourages student engagement and active learning, two of the key reasons why the flipped classroom can be successful when designed effectively. Key to this success lies in the ability to motivate students to complete the necessary pre-class or pre-reading activities, posing a real issue in higher education settings. Academics still grapple with how to motivate students to engage in pre-class preparation and which technologies to use to enable students to achieve the learning outcomes. Embedding student and teacher accountability in all aspects of the learning is also crucial to flipping success.

    The authors will demonstrate how a design template, constructed to directly align with sound pedagogies, was developed by The Flipped Classroom Community of Practice at The University of Adelaide and implemented to create engaging and interactive pre-reading instructional packages. The cross- faculty applicability of the design template will be demonstrated using examples from undergraduate classes and academic professional development settings.

    A range of technologies and software were utilised including video, light boards, and narrated Articulate Storyline packages. The preclass online instructional packages for undergraduate students and an in-class flipped instructional videos for academics were deployed using the learning management systems Blackboard and/or Canvas to facilitate tracking of engagement and completion. Careful design of the pre-class activities ensured participants with diverse knowledge, background and ability were successfully engaged and motivated to learn in preparation for the active in-class learning.

    The use of Learning Analytics to gain feedback to feed-forward in MOOC designs

    Principal Presenter
    Karina Riggs, Faculty of Sciences

    Co-Presenter
    Mariam Aman Shah, University of South Australia

    Abstract
    Learning analytics has been defined in the literature as the measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of data about participants and their learning environment. Learning analytics can provide impactful insights into the design of Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs), in particular how participants engage with online material. Learning analytics not only provides information about participant interactions which can be regularly reviewed at pivotal points in a course, but is also a powerful mechanism for providing feedback that can be used to reflect, refine, adjust or improve a MOOC by feeding forward what has been learned to new iterations. While learning analytics is used in many MOOCs to report on student retention, behaviour, participation and performance, active strategies to diagnose and monitor achievement of learning outcomes are often lacking. This crucial actionable intelligence can help academic staff devise agile interventions to increase participant engagement and performance in a MOOC.

    An exploratory investigation into two iterations of the Essential Human Biology MOOC (instructor-led and self-paced) within the AdelaideX initiative (Australia) was undertaken using learning analytics to provide insights into participant activity and MOOC learning design. A comparison of completers and non-completers in the MOOC revealed differences in age of participants, peer interaction, engagement with content and navigational patterns which are critical to participant success in a MOOC. From this reflective study, recommendations were identified for course/MOOC designers on how participants interact with online content in two different delivery modes which could potentially enhance participant completion rates in MOOCs.

    Flipping and Inquiring in Public Law

    Principal Presenter
    Matthew Stubbs, Faculty of the Professions

    Abstract
    This presentation reviews an implementation of the ‘flipped classroom’ and simultaneous introduction of a significant inquirylearning component in a large, compulsory first-year law course in public law.

    Commencing in 2014, the Principles of Public Law course at Adelaide Law School has been delivered in a fully flipped-classroom mode. All traditional lecture content was transferred into pre lecture videos, each complemented by summative online quizzes to be completed before the course ‘lectures’, which now involve students in case reading and problem solving activities. This teaching now occupies the first 7 weeks of the course, followed by a week of revision, and the final exam. The final 4 weeks of the course are then devoted to a research-focused inquiry-learning experience.

    This presentation reports on an evaluation of the effectiveness of flipping and inquiring in Principles of Public Law, by examining student success (primarily in the course assessments), student evaluations of the course in SELTs, and student responses to more detailed analytical questions contained in specific flipped classroom and inquiry learning surveys.

    I will also offer reflections from the perspective of an academic implementing this radical change to pedagogy (for the traditionally conservative discipline of public law, at least), and identify some of the lessons learned along the way, particularly by discussing how the course has evolved each year.

    My Digital Ongoing Journey: Comparing Laws in a Blended Learning Environment

    Principal Presenter
    Jessica Viven-Wilksch, Faculty of the Professions

    Abstract
    This presentation will take you through the journey of a law academic who used videos and flipped classroom activities to transform student engagement both online and in class. In 2016, Comparative Law, an undergraduate course, was designed, transformed and accessed through the Canvas LMS. This represented an opportunity to deliver an integrated student experience through an actively used LMS, by creating and innovating while building a course that deals with laws around the world.

    Using filming facilities and locations available within the university and with the support of members of the Faculty of Professions and technology services, scripts were prepared, videos filmed, edited and uploaded. Each week and prior to class, students accessed videos ranging from superimposed lecturer on PowerPoints to interviews of colleagues and legal professionals. Students engaged with the material in a fun manner and made informed contribution in class, thanks to a mix of delivery methods and amusing catchy phrases.

    After the semester ended, the digital journey was shared with students in the making of their own short video based on their SGDE assignment. The SGDE group highlighted the results of their research in a punchy manner, thereby further developing their summarising skills and their ability to review and adapt their work for different audiences. Under the supervision of the academic, they scripted, structured and filmed a video to be shown to the next intake of students for the course alongside the other recorded videos.

    This year the journey continues by recording new videos based on students’ interests and current issues, and by using the now available Echo360 ALP and analytics to better target students’ learning through the mixing of enhanced digital environment. Transforming delivery does not have to be daunting, all it takes is one step to be on your own digital journey.

  • Roundtable Discussions
    Principal Author Title
    Bailey, Judith Student Digital Experience Survey
    Ortega, Colleen Active learning in lectures: perspectives on using Echo360 ALP for learning in lecture theatres
    Palmer, Edward Through the Looking Glass: Staff and student perspectives of being a learner at The University of Adelaide
    Szabo, Claudia Diversity and Inclusion in the Digital Futures

    Student Digital Experience Survey

    Principle Facilitator
    Judith Bailey, Division of Academic and Student Engagement

    Co-Facilitators
    Lucy Thomson, Division of Division of University Operations
    Liz Heathcote, Division of Academic and Student Engagement

    Questions for discussion:
    How do our students experience using digital technologies, activities and resources in their learning? How do their experiences compare with those of students of other universities?

    The University of Adelaide took part in a pilot of the Student Digital Experience survey in March 2017. The survey was coordinated by Jisc (UK) and was conducted in 29 Higher Education institutions in the UK as well as 10 institutions in South Africa, Australia and New Zealand. The main focus of the survey was to gather evidence from learners about their digital experiences and expectations. Our survey collected over 1500 responses from undergraduate and postgraduate students (which was far in excess of the average of 216 at other institutions).

    Survey results suggest that students primarily access our services through mobile devices and turn to online and informal support when they want assistance with digital skills. A large majority (77%) agree that using online tools, such as Canvas, helps them fit learning into their lives more easily but that face-to-face teaching is still crucial to their learning. Whilst more than 80% agreed that digital skills are important in their chosen career, only 53% felt that their course prepared them adequately for the digital workplace.

    This roundtable will present the survey results and provide an opportunity for participants to explore the practical and pedagogical implications of the results, for example in relation to embedding support for students’ digital capabilities development in the curriculum.

    1. Although the majority of students use mobile devices to access our services, can we assume that all students have access to these devices and the Internet?
       How do we ensure that:
             > All students have access to these devices?
             > Have the digital capabilities to navigate ‘oceans of information’?
             > Our course content is mobile-friendly?
    2. Many students feel that lecturers lack an understanding of how to use technology effectively from both pedagogical and practical perspectives. How shall we:
             > Better develop academic staff digital capabilities in each Faculty?
             > Foster discussions at school level on how to use digital tools underpinned by good, evidence-based and
                research-driven pedagogical practices?
    3. There is clear demand from students for digital activities that complement traditional learning, but also that these activities should not stop face-to-face experiences. How may we develop engaging blended learning programs and courses and leverage online learning strategies to improve our face-to-face teaching?

    Active learning in lectures: perspectives on using Echo360 ALP for learning in lecture theatres

    Principle Facilitator
    Colleen Ortega, Division of Academic and Student Engagement

    Co-Facilitators
    Chad Habel, Faculty of Arts
    Cheryl Pope, Faculty of Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences
    Jason Alford, Division of Academic and Student Engagement
    Joy McEntee, Faculty of Arts
    Raymond Vozzo, Faculty of Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences

    Questions for discussion:
    1. Why use the Echo360 Active Learning Platform?
    2. How could the ALP be used to support different teaching approaches?
    3. Why are students who use ALP more engaged?
    4. What can the data from Echo360 tell us about student engagement?

    Through the Looking Glass: Staff and student perspectives of being a learner at The University of Adelaide

    Principle Facilitator
    Edward Palmer, Faculty of Arts

    Co-Facilitator
    Sandra Popovich, Faculty of Sciences

    Questions for discussion:
    In this 45 minute roundtable session, the key experiences of life as a student will be discussed, placed into an evidence-based context and reported as key recommendations on things we all need to prioritise when we are teaching. General findings will be that we offer high quality courses, with enthusiastic and dedicated staff, but there are some aspects of a lecturer’s work that can be improved with little impact to workload, but provide real benefit for students. These are the aspects that we will discuss as a group.

    Whilst individual courses will not be discussed, key questions will be posed:
    1. What are the most important aspects of the use of AccessAdelaide, MyUni, the delivery of course information and eSELTS?
    2. How does the nature of assessments and exams and the deadlines attached to them affect student engagement?
    3. What is the value of lectures, tutorials, group work and recordings?
    4. What role do students want technology to play in their learning?

    Diversity and Inclusion in the Digital Futures

    Principle Facilitator
    Claudia Szabo, Faculty of Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences

    Co-Facilitators
    Anne Hewitt, Faculty of the Professions
    Ben Chandler, Division of Academic and Student Engagement
    Braden Philips, Faculty of Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences
    Laura Grenfell, Faculty of the Professions
    Robyn Davidson, Faculty of the Professions

    Questions for discussion:
    1. Sharing session - in your discipline/school, how diverse are classrooms?
    2. What are the challenges that teachers face in creating an inclusive teaching and learning environments?
    3. In the context of digital futures, what specific challenges are there in creating inclusive teaching and learning environments?
    4. In the context of these challenges, what support do you think is necessary?
    5. What resources do you think would be most useful to you?

  • Poster Abstracts
    Principal Author Title
    Bowes, Samantha Student Digital Experience Survey
    Enomoto, Kayoko and Miller, Julia The case for ACASE
    Gonzalez, Mary Focusing Strategies to Engage your Students in the Flipped Classroom
    Malessa, Niko MyUni Data - Down the rabbit hole
    Royals, Jaime and Bowes, Samantha Building Digitally Capable Students: creating a digital capabilities framework
    Singh, Chetan Agile – A way of learning

    Student Digital Experience Survey

    Principle Author
    Samantha Bowes, Division of Academic and Student Engagement

    Co-Authors
    David Santandreu Calonge, Division of Academic and Student Engagement
    Judith Bailey, Division of Academic and Student Engagement
    Sian Aston, Division of Academic and Student Engagement

    Abstract
    The poster will distil the results from a pilot of the Student Digital Experience survey which was undertaken in March 2017. The survey was coordinated by Jisc (UK) and was conducted in 38 Higher Education institutions in the UK as well as a number of institutions in South Africa, Australia and New Zealand. Our survey collected over 1500 responses from undergraduate and postgraduate students. The poster will display the results in a highly visual and interactive manner.

    The case for ACASE

    Principle Authors
    Julia Miller, Faculty of Arts
    Kayoko Enomoto, Faculty of Arts

    Abstract
    Searchable transcriptions of lecturers’ academic spoken English present opportunities for research in fields as diverse as computer science, psychology, gender studies, education, and language learning and teaching. Collections of such transcriptions (called ‘corpora’) exist for the UK and the US, but not for Australia. This poster outlines the need for an online Australian Corpus of Academic Spoken English (ACASE) and explores its possible research applications. The poster also includes student partners’ perspectives on potential uses of ACASE for academic acculturation in Australia.

    Focusing strategies to engage your students in the flipped classroom

    Principle Author
    Mary Gonzalez, Faculty of Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences

    Abstract
    The integration of focusing activities in the flipped classroom set the stage for learning and helps to establish a routine of engagement which will encourage student preparation, and maximize class time.

    MyUni Data - Down the rabbit hole...

    Principle Author
    Niko Malessa, Division of University Operations

    Co-Authors
    Chris Doherty, Division of University Operations
    Geraint Draheim, Division of University Operations

    Abstract
    Have you ever wondered how students, staff, courses and enrolments end up in MyUni? How come I have to log in to MyUni and access my Echo 360 content before I can see it in the mobile app? If you’d like to better understand how this all works look no further!

    Building Digitally Capable Students: creating a digital capabilities framework

    Principle Author
    Jaime Royals, Division of Academic and Student Engagement

    Co-Author
    Samantha Bowes, Division of Academic and Student Engagement

    Abstract
    This poster outlines the process of developing a Digital Capabilities Framework at the University. From engaging with staff and students (including focus groups, a reference group, and 100 pizzas), to procuring the expertise of an international expert and conducting a review of current best practice, the 18-month project has engaged academic and professional staff from across the University community. This poster will demonstrate the process of moving from an abstract concept to a practical Framework ready for implementation. The Framework will be launched at the Festival of Learning and Teaching.

    Agile – A way of learning

    Principle Author
    Anne Hewitt, Faculty of the Professions

    Co-Authors
    Geraint Draheim, Division of University Operations
    Grette Wilkinson, Division of University Operations
    Mark Wittervan, Division of Academic and Student Engagement

    Abstract
    If you have heard the ‘Agile’ buzzword floating around and now you think you are ready understand how Agile actually works in the University and how it can be used as a way of learning. It is actually not very different from the Kolb’s learning styles model: we can explain how….

  • PechaKucha Abstracts
    Principal Author Title
    Bailey, Judith Digital capabilities for researchers in the 21st century
    Basic, Martin The Role of Modern Media Consumption Platforms in Student-centred Learning
    Di Sotto-Hames, Angela Working with blended learners in Maths
    Draheim, Geraint The Canvas Community: Getting the best out of Canvas
    Dodd, Mark Online Video Content - A Substitute for or a Complement to the Face-to-Face Lecture?
    Elms, Philip Lights, Camera, Action! Using Animations in Learning & Teaching
    Evans, Bernard Using a Self-Directed Memory Tool to Improve and Track Student Performance
    Henrique Ribeiro Santiago, Pedro Meditation on the screen? The history of teaching mindfulness online
    Katharesan, Viythia Use of annotated and interactive videos to teach histology
    McEntee, Joy Supporting and developing staff and student engagement with Small Group Discovery Experience (SGDE) via a curated repository of student work in Canvas
    Ogilvie, Alison Breeding, and the Bard: Co-creation of learning experiences on the global scale
    Painter, Ainsley Towards digitally savvy higher degree researchers
    Soong, Dayle A technology mix-tape: Learning to love teaching via video conferencing using a flipped approach and MyUni
    Tibby, John Improving student writing with the software Grammarly

    Digital capabilities for researchers in the 21st century

    Principle Presenter
    Judith Bailey, Division of Academic and Student Engagement

    Co-Presenter
    Cally Guerin, Faculty of Arts

    Abstract
    This presentation reports on a pilot study using the Digital Capabilities Framework with HDRs in the Faculty of Arts. Participants undertook an audit of their current capabilities and reflected on their development needs. In the process, they evaluated the framework. Overall, we saw a broad range of capabilities demonstrated, even amongst those who did not regard themselves as high level users.

    The Role of Modern Media Consumption Platforms in Student-centred Learning

    Principle Presenter
    Martin Basic, Division of Academic and Student Engagement

    Abstract
    The days of TV trolleys and public-access VHS tapes in the classroom are over. This presentation will explore the role of modern media consumption platforms, like YouTube, Twitch and TED, in supplementing student-centred learning environments. See how application of solid pedagogical practice can inform an engaging and accessible course for the modern student.

    Working with blended learners in maths

    Principle Presenter
    Angela Di Sotto-Hames, The University of Adelaide College

    Abstract
    Alternative methods of assessments were explored to address special need students in my tutorial group. Rather than creating individual tasks for some, with the help of technology, a task and consequently a method of assessment, was developed for all to engage in and benefit from. While positive feedback was collected from students, I’m keen to hear feedback from others.

    The Canvas Community: Getting the best out of Canvas

    Principle Presenter
    Geraint Draheim, Division of University Operations

    Co-Presenter
    Colleen Ortega, Division of Academic and Student Engagement

    Abstract
    The Canvas Community is a key part of the Canvas user experience. Academic and student interactions and contributions within the Canvas Community are a key aspect in the way that Canvas is supported. This is how bug-fixes and new ideas are identified and prioritised in the Canvas development process. Join Colleen Ortega (Learning Technologies Team) and Geraint Draheim (Teaching Applications) for an introduction to the Canvas Community, how to get involved, and how we can all work together in the Canvas Community to get the best out of Canvas in our Learning and Teaching.

    Online Video Content - A Substitute for or a Complement to the Face-to-Face Lecture?

    Principle Presenter
    Mark Dodd, Faculty of the Professions

    Abstract
    Sixty-three short videos were prepared initially for an online-only postgraduate Economics course. They cover all content usually delivered in the face-to-face lectures. Subsequently, the videos were made available in a number of in-person offerings of the same course that still have the face-to-face lectures. This is a brief analysis of how the video content was used in the blended learning environment.

    Lights, Camera, Action! Using Animations in Learning & Teaching

    Principle Presenter
    Philip Elms, Faculty of the Professions

    Co-Presenter
    Chelsea Liu, Faculty of the Professions

    Abstract
    Animated videos constitute a valuable pedagogical tool. They not only engage students with graphic/visual and audio stimuli, but also help simplify complex technical content to facilitate better understanding, thus enhancing both student interest and learning outcomes. In this presentation we will provide a cradle-to-grave overview of the process of creating animated videos for learning and teaching purposes, and share feedback and statistics on their effectiveness.

    Using a Self-Directed Memory Tool to Improve and Track Student Performance

    Principle Author
    Bernard Evans, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

    Abstract
    Here I present a self-directed learning tool developed during my Undergraduate study to facilitate learning material from subjects with a high content of rote-learned material.

    The tool is constructed from a database of key knowledge points and tests the user via a novel form of repetition learning. It has numerous pedagogical applications for both the student and teacher including selfdirected learning, and immediate feedback on learning progress. Perhaps more importantly the tool enables both students and teachers to identify those topics that achieve the lowest and highest degree of mastery and do and do not warrant remediation.

    Meditation on the screen? The history of teaching mindfulness online

    Principle Presenter
    Pedro Henrique Ribeiro Santiago, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

    Abstract
    Mindfulness meditation is an evidence-based practice that is shown to help people regulate better their emotions and live happier lives. An online mindfulness course can reach a larger population, but what are the difficulties of teaching meditation through the screen? This Pecha Kucha tells the history, successes and pitfalls of a psychologist (me) who decide to create a mindfulness course on the platform Udemy.

    Use of annotated and interactive videos to teach histology

    Principle Presenter
    Viythia Katharesan, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

    Co-Presenters
    Corinna Van Den Heuvel, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
    Danijela Menicanin, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
    Mario Ricci, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

    Abstract
    Many students find studying histology (cell microscopy) via traditional means difficult as they experience technical and practical difficulties mastering the use of microscopes, it is difficult for demonstrators to provide individual assistance to all students who have difficulty interpreting microscopic morphology, and only the student operating the microscope can view the slide which discourages collaboration and group discussion. Yet, histology is crucial to understanding the structure and function of the body in health and disease. To address these challenges, we have recorded a series of annotated histology videos using the Explain Everything app on the iPad. These videos have been uploaded to Canvas via the Arc Media plugin that lets learners and instructors engage with video content by commenting directly on the video timeline. Results of our pilot project will be discussed.

    Supporting and developing staff and student engagement with Small Group Discovery Experience (SGDE) via a curated repository of student work in Canvas

    Principle Presenter
    Joy McEntee, Faculty of Arts

    Co-Presenter
    Gareth Pritchard, Faculty of Arts

    Abstract
    In 2016, a team created a showcase for student-generated SGDE materials in Canvas, the University’s dynamic new Learning Management System. The site will go live in July 2017. The plan was for the SGDE repository to become a rich resource for staff students, promoting best practice SGDE teaching, increasing students’ sense of ownership of their own work, and encouraging student as co-creators in their engagement with SGDEs. This presentation discusses the project outcomes and the experiences of the team.

    Breeding, and the Bard: Co-creation of learning experiences on the global scale

    Principle Presenter
    Alison Ogilvie, Division of Academic and Student Engagement

    Co-Presenters
    Andrew Beatton, Division of Academic and Student Engagement
    Dee Halil, AdelaideX, Division of Academic and Student Engagement

    Abstract
    This presentation explores the innovative inclusion of student voice and perspective within the Shakespeare and the Reproduction MOOCs, and how this is driving the shape of course content and assessment. The AdelaideX team, in partnership with academic subject matter experts, staff and students, are breaking new ground in their approach to designing and building online courses by incorporating formative review, and iterative design throughout development. The presentation outlines the ways in which AdelaideX approaches course development as a multifaceted and adaptive collaboration driven by the needs of the learner, and by the objectives of the digital learning experience.

    Towards digitally savvy higher degree researchers

    Principle Presenter
    Ainsley Painter, Division of Academic and Student Engagement

    Abstract
    A survey of 233 University of Adelaide staff and students showed the need to initiate scholarly workshops for HDR students.

    Students asked for specific workshop topics necessary to build their research and professional profile.

    The Library Research Training Team was formed to develop a series of workshops and digital content, that was later integrated in the CaRST program. The team uses iterative reflective practices to continuously reassess, refine and redesign content based on student feedback. This presentation reports on this process.

    A technology mix-tape: Learning to love teaching via video conferencing using a flipped approach and MyUni

    Principle Author
    Dayle Soong, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

    Abstract
    A mix-tape of Zoom, Google Docs, Google Slides, MyUni Quizzes, and Storyline. There is something for everybody. This presentation will showcase practical approaches used in a medicine course to transition from PowerPoint teaching to a flipped classroom, even when the classroom is virtual.

    Improving student writing with the software Grammarly

    Principle Presenter
    John Tibby, Faculty of Arts

    Co-Presenter
    Liz Heathcote, Division of Academic and Student Engagement

    Abstract
    The University has been trialing Grammarly, a software that highlights students’ grammatical errors and provides two levels context specific advice about grammar rules since June 2016 across all year levels and has surveyed student views about the software. There was very high broad agreement among students who made use of the software that Grammarly was easy to use, made helpful suggestions, helped them understand Grammar rules and improve their writing. This presentation will discuss results from the 2016 and 2017 survey along with the process by which staff can propose innovations such as the Grammarly trial, or feature requests for MyUni.

Byte Size Bazaar

1.00pm - 2.30pm

The Byte Size Bazaar consists of a number of stations across the North Terrace campus, and will be open directly after the lunch break. Festival attendees will be able to drop into the stations at their own leisure and experience some of our digital learning and teaching technologies and resources, and to meet with some key staff and groups who can support you in your learning and teaching development. A list of the stations can be found below. A map indicating locations can be found on the Festival Map page.

Byte Size Bazaar Stations

  • Communities of Practice groups

    Lounge, Learning Innovations Studio, level 3, Barr Smith South (except Learning Analytics which will be in The Cog, level 7, Kenneth Wills)

    The Communities of Practice groups provide an opportunity for staff and students to come together on a regular basis to discuss topics of strategic relevance to the institution, and to deepen their knowledge and expertise. Come along to the Learning Innovation Studio to find out more about each group.

    Career Readiness 2.0, Wayne Errington

    Diversity and Inclusion in Teaching, Laura Grenfell eLearning, Jessica Viven-Wilksch

    Flipped Classroom, Hayley McGrice

    Learning Analytics (The Cog, level 7, Kenneth Wills), David Wilson

    Small Group Discovery Experience (SGDE), Catherine Snelling and Beth Loveys

    Student Engagement, Edward Palmer, Ben Chandler and Sandra Popovich

  • Digital Capabilities @ Adelaide: how the Framework affects you 

    Judith Bailey and Jamie Royals
    Meeting room, Learning Innovation Studio, level 3, Barr Smith South

    The Digital Capabilities Framework (DCF) will be launched at the FoLT. Head over to the DCF booth to learn more about what the Framework is, hear case studies of how digital capabilities are already being incorporated into courses and how you, as a teacher, can get on board by integrating more digital capabilities into your own courses. Speak with Judy Bailey, the Project Officer as well as academic and teaching support staff who can provide advice and feedback on current courses and ideas for the future.

  • Interested in Innovative Filming Approaches to Blended Learning? A Showcase of Lightboard, Green-screen and LiveKey Technologies for Medical Teaching

    Nicolene Lottering
    Video Suite, Learning Innovations Studio, level 3, Barr Smith South

    If you’re interested in learning what’s on offer to assist with filming online lectures and blended learning resources in your classroom, come along to a showcase of the Video Editing Suite, specifically Live Key, Green screen and Lightboard Learning Glass technologies, in the Barr Smith Library. You will be exposed to a variety of videos that have been produced for teaching in the School of Medicine, and will have an opportunity to hear/ask about equipment troubleshooting, behind the scene considerations (lighting, sound, storyboarding) and post-production involvement regarding each of these modalities.

  • Feeling blue? Come and try the green screen!

    Trisha Franceschilli and Dave Johnson
    Recording Studio, level 2, Barr Smith Library

    This Byte Size Bazaar session will demonstrate the live key facility of the new self-serve recording studio on level 2 of the Barr Smith Library - see how you can green screen yourself in real time.

    If you wish to make a quick recording, please bring a PowerPoint in 16:9 format and a USB.

  • Virtual Reality Hands-on demonstration

    Frank Donnelly
    Level 2, Barr Smith Library

    This session allows participants to engage in a number of virtual reality experiences. Attendees will be able to view 3Dimensional videos and virtual reality settings using a high end virtual reality headset (HTC Vive). Users will be immersed into different virtual settings and experiences and get a sense of what it is like to be in that actual place and time. Staff from the Adelaide Nursing School are using VR to create experiences for students. This session will briefly describe considerations for filming, equipment, software use and management of VR. The focus of this developing work is the operating theatre environment.

  • High Fidelity Patient Simulator

    Adam Montagu and Libby Kentish
    Room 422, Level 4, Horace Lamb

    Come and meet ‘Hal’, one of our human patient simulators. Let us share with you the technology involved in simulation based medical and nursing teaching, including pre-reading and assessment.

  • Dental Simulation lab

    Lucy Ludlow
    1041a, Level 1, Barr Smith South

    Come and experience the Dental Simulation Clinic which provides Dentistry and Oral health students with a simulated dental clinical facility, where they are taught under clinical supervision to practice and perfect their dexterity and skills before they begin to operate on patients. They also learn how to conduct themselves in a clinical environment which maintains similar infection control procedures to those of the Dental clinics they will eventually practice in.

  • Learning Analytics – Exploring data together

    Daniel Barry, Marziah Zarazillah and John Murphy
    The Cog, level 7, Kenneth Wills

    Does your course learning design engage students? Which students are most active in the discussion board? What learning resources are accessed most often? Which students have responded to Echo360 ALP questions in class? Come along to find out more with the Learning Analytics team and discover the answers for YOUR course
    in less than 10 minutes!

    Data on learning and teaching practice is now more accessible through Canvas and Echo, allowing teaching staff to explore and understand patterns of learning behaviour. Obtaining insight into course interactions is key for supporting an evidence-informed evaluation of course learning design. This session will demonstrate useful tools and resources for obtaining course and learner data from MyUni in just a few minutes. Participants can ask questions with learning designers and data analysts, rapidly explore data sources, and learn more about future activities within the Learning Analytics Project.

Digital Scavenger Hunt

8.30am - 2.30pm

Sponsored by The University of Adelaide College

The digital scavenger hunt, sponsored by The University of Adelaide College, will provide our attendees with an extra level of fun and antics throughout the first part of the day (8.30 – 2.30pm), as well as an opportunity to learn more about learning and teaching at the University of Adelaide, and your fellow Festival attendees. To compete in the scavenger hunt, you will need to download the Goosechase app to your mobile phone, and search for the game: FOLT2017. To download the app, please visit the app store or Google Play and search for ‘Goosechase’.

The scavenger hunt will consist of a variety of text, photo and GPS based questions, and the app will keep everyone updated on game progress with a live feed and leaderboard. But watch out! Once the Hunt is complete, the Game Masters will be reviewing all submissions, so pay close attention to any rules or guidelines in the questions. They may also reward bonus points to those who put extra effort into their answers – especially for creative photos! Once final results have been calculated, two winners will be announced at the drinks session at 5.00pm and will receive an iPad each as their prize!*

Let the Hunt begin!

Please note: the winners must be at the drinks session at 5.00pm to receive prizes. If the winners are not in attendance, the prizes will go to the next highest scoring participants.


Map

Festival Map
Address

Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor
& Vice-President (Academic)
The University of Adelaide
SA 5005 AUSTRALIA

Contact

Office of the DVC&VP(A)
T: +61 8313 5901
F: +61 8313 8333
Email: pvcsl@adelaide.edu.au

Festival of Learning & Teaching