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Program Structure and Entry Requirements

Admission Requirements

  • Standard Admission - undergraduate programs

    Under the current Admissions to Coursework Programs Policy the eligibility criteria for admission to academic programs are entirely at the discretion of the University. The criteria may include but is not limited to:

    1. Academic Criteria – i.e. formal qualifications or previous studies or prerequisite studies in the secondary, post-secondary, tertiary or higher education sectors
    2. Academic or other tests/requirements – i.e. auditions, portfolio, interview/oral assessment, specific knowledge test or aptitude test, work experience, application statement, referee reports
    3. English language proficiency
    4. Any combination of the above

    Eligibility criteria may be changed but once it is made public for a specified intake/calendar period it will not be changed except in exceptional circumstances.

    There are four Standard Admission Criteria for Undergraduate programs. They are:

    Year 12 sub-quota
    Eligibility: eligible to compete in this sub-quota if the applicant has completed SACE Stage 2 or an equivalent qualification; and has completed 2 years or less full-time-equivalent higher education study.
    Rank: eligible applicants ranked on the basis of their ATAR (Australian Tertiary Admissions Rank).
    Higher Education sub-quota
    Eligibility: eligible to compete in this sub-quota if the applicant has completed at least 6 months full-time-equivalent higher education study.
    Rank: eligible applicants ranked on the basis of their best GPA (Grade Point Average).
    VET sub-quota
    Eligibility: eligible to compete in this sub-quota if the applicant has completed an AQF Certificate IV or above from any Registered Training Organisation. (Exceptions are listed on the attached spreadsheet)
    Rank: eligible applicants ranked according to the level of the completed award.
    Special Entry sub-quota
    Eligibility: domestic applicants are eligible to compete in this sub-quota if the applicant is over 18 years old on 1 February of the year they apply for entry to; and, if they were enrolled in a program leading to a higher education award, they must not have completed more than 2 years full-time equivalent study in that program.
    Rank: eligible applicants ranked according to their results in the STAT (Special Tertiary Admissions Test), or for some programs a combination of the STAT result and/or personal competencies statements and/or employment experience statements.

    Eligibility Score

    The University must report to Commonwealth Department of Education the lowest ATAR for which a student, Commonwealth Supported or Full Fee Paying, may be eligible for entry to one of its programs – the Eligibility Score. The University has determined that the following Eligibility Scores will apply:

    Bachelor programs Bachelor (Advanced) degrees 95
    Medicine & Dentistry 90
    Engineering, Law & Commerce 80
    Oral Health 70
    All new Bachelor programs 65
    Diploma programs All Diploma programs 55
  • Standard Admission - postgraduate coursework programs

    The standard admission criteria for all Masters programs is a Bachelor Degree.

  • Non-Standard Admission Criteria - undergraduate and postgraduate coursework

    Non-standard admission requirements – Coursework Academic Programs

    Admission requirements for coursework programs must be consistent with the Policy for Admission to Coursework Academic Programs and Enabling Courses. For programs which require additional non-standard admission requirements approval must be sought via a submission to the Program Approval and Entry Committee. A table of programs which have been granted approval to include non-standard admission requirements can be found in the document available from the link below.

  • English Language Standards

    Minimum English Language Standards – Coursework Academic Programs

    International students seeking admission to the University's coursework academic programs must meet minimum English language standards. Tables that list the minimum standards and the recognised English language tests for all of the University's coursework programs can be found in the document available from the link below.

    The University has approved new Minimum English Language Requirements for entry in 2018. Students commencing in 2018, or deferring their studies to 2018, should be aware of the new requirements when preparing their application.

    Changes to these requirements may only be made following a submission to the Program Approval & Entry Committee.

    Australian Year 12 Applicants

    International students undertaking an Australian Year 12 program will meet the English language proficiency requirements with a passing grade or above in a recognised English as a Second Language or an English Language subject, as a part of the successful completion of their year 12 qualification.

    International students who are not required to undertake an English subject to successfully complete their Australian Year 12 qualification (or those who successfully complete their Year 12 qualification but do not pass their English subject), can meet the English language proficiency requirements by achieving or exceeding the minimum score in an IELTS or another accepted English language test.

    Successful completion of the International Baccalaureate Diploma meets the English language requirements of the University of Adelaide.

  • GPA as a condition of admission or progress requirement

    GPA as a condition of admission or progress requirement

    Following a recommendation from the Program Approval and Entry Committee meeting 2/15 on 5 March 2015, the Deputy Vice-Chancellor & Vice-President (Academic) approved the following:

    • that a minimum GPA threshold range of 4.0 to 5.0 (out of 7.0), or equivalent, be established for those programs that require a minimum GPA as part of admission criteria and that PAEC approval be required if a minimum GPA is established outside this range. When GPA is required for progression, then the range of 4-5 should be established.

    Following a recommendation from the Program Approval and Entry Committee meeting 3/17 on 13 April 2017, the Deputy Vice-Chancellor & Vice-President (Academic) approved that all GPA entry requirements that fall between the range of 4-5 must come to PAEC for noting, before being added to the NSAR. GPAs between 4-5 will only be considered approved once noted by PAEC with an effective date of that on which PAEC noted the change.

    The Program Approval and Entry Committee meeting 2/15 on 5 March 2015 agreed to:

    • endorse that the following principles be the basis of any application to use minimum GPA outside of the threshold range for admission to the University's programs or as a minimum requirement for progression through a program:
    1. provide a rationale for specifying a GPA outside the threshold range as an admission requirement for the program or as a minimum standard of achievement to progress within the program (e.g. GPA to be used to determine a quota); and
    2. provide pedagogical justification for their inclusion and the level at which the minimum is being set (e.g. program requires high level of performance).
  • Entry Schemes

    Australia Awards Scholarship (AAS) awardees

    AAS applicants participate in a competitive and rigorous selection process. As a consequence the following qualifications will satisfy a program's minimum academic entry requirements of an AQF Level 7 Bachelor award for AAS awardees:

    • Cambodia - NOOSR Section 2 institutions, minimum 4 years of study, minimum GPA of "B" (70-84), 3.0/4 or equivalent;
    • Laos - National University of Laos, Bachelor degree (NOOSR assessed equivalency of Associate Degree), minimum GPA of 3.0/4;
    • Myanmar - NOOSR Section 2 institutions, minimum 4 years of study, minimum GPA of "A", 4/5 OR 3.0/4.0;
    • Other countries and instances (Undergraduate qualification assessed as AQF Level 6) - assessment on case-by-case basis in consultation with relevant Faculty. A minimum GPA of 3.0/4.0 or equivalent is required.

Standards for Undergraduate Programs

  • Terms and Definitions

    The Undergraduate Curriculum Structures Framework has formalised a range of commonly used terms related to Undergraduate programs. These terms and their definitions have been included in the glossary of the Coursework Academic Programs Policy and should be used for all undergraduate programs. In particular they should be used when updating publications and providing advice to students. The Coursework Academic Programs Policy can be found on the University's policy website.

  • Key Components

    The key components of the University’s undergraduate programs are:

    1. All bachelor degrees, including named degrees, require the equivalent of a Major consisting of courses to the value of 24 units, with a minimum of normally 12 units to be presented at Level III / Advanced level.
    2. All bachelor degrees, including named degrees, require the inclusion of a minimum of 9 units of Broadening Electives to be designated by Subject Area and taken in a Subject Area outside of the program, unless an equivalent broadening experience is provided to students through other means. The designation of the Subject Areas to be recommended for approval in accord with the Program Development and Approval processes, are specified from time to time by the Program Approval and Entry Committee.
      (Formally approved Study Abroad and Exchange opportunities taken for credit may be counted in lieu of Broadening Electives.)
      (Clause 3d of Coursework Academic Programs Policy)
    3. All academic undergraduate programs should be differentiated by at least 9 units of unique content unless the program is sufficiently differentiated from any other program to ensure students are provided with a unique experience.
    4. Academic Literacy and Research Skills must be systematically integrated through the duration of the program.
    5. A capstone research experience must be included in all undergraduate programs.
  • Generalist and Named Degrees

    The Undergraduate Curriculum Structures Framework (UCSF) identified two types of Bachelor degrees that are offered by the University – Named and Generalist Degrees. Each of these has different requirements under the UCSF. To assist Faculties and Schools in the development and ongoing management of undergraduate programs the Program Approval & Entry Committee (PAEC) has developed a series of terms and definitions that will be applied to undergraduate programs.

    For generalist degrees PAEC have developed the following criteria that will be used when making such a determination:

    • few or no requirements for core courses with none in the final year of the program;
    • availability of a broad range of majors across many disciplines;
    • completion of the program does not lead to professional registration/practice;
    • substantial flexibility in course choice, outside of requirements for each major;
    • capacity to take courses from outside of the program;
    • program is not subject to accreditation;
    • less than half of the program has a prescribed pathway; and
    • 9 units of unique content will be included in the program.

    PAEC will apply all or any of the criteria and be flexible in the weighting of each criterion when making a determination.

    Programs not determined as generalist degrees are automatically considered named degrees and must conform to the following requirements:

    • named degrees will identify an area of specialisation that will provide the educational outcomes that their name suggests;
    • named degrees will avoid substantial overlap with existing programs; and
    • named degrees must include a minimum of 9 units of unique content together with the equivalent of a 24 unit Major and 9 units of Broadening Electives or an equivalent broadening experience.
  • Bachelor (Advanced)

    Principles and Guidelines were developed by the University's Beacon of Learning and Teaching Taskforce and amended by Academic Board at meeting 1/15 on 4 March 2015.

    Principles

    1. Each faculty will have a minimum of one Bachelor (Advanced) program from 2014 onwards.
    2. Bachelor (Advanced) programs must recruit high ATAR students ( 95 before subject bonus points).
    3. Students must earn and maintain a GPA of no less than 5.0/7.0 on a teaching period basis to remain in the program.
    4. The minimum program GPA for transfer into a Bachelor (Advanced) program is 5.5 for entry from semester 2, 2015.
    5. The minimum program GPA for students transferring between Bachelor (Advanced) programs is 5.0.
    6. Each Bachelor (Advanced) program must provide no less than 9 units of unique content (i.e. courses not available in any other program).
    7. Each Bachelor (Advanced) program should offer other activities such as seminars, workshops or events, reserved for that cohort, with the view to challenge these students in relation to their discipline.
    8. The same graduate attributes are sought and embedded in the program, but the expectations in relation to the level of achievement of these will be higher. There will be a particular emphasis placed on specific graduate attributes depending on the specific focus of the program, such as research, work placement or study abroad.

    Guidelines

    1. For Bachelor (Advanced) programs that seek to enhance research skills, the 9 units of unique content must be research focussed.
    2. Each area will ensure that research active staff are involved in the teaching of unique content courses.
    3. The cohort in each Bachelor (Advanced) program should be dependent on the individual discipline area. Bachelor (Advanced) programs should only be developed where the cohort can reach a sustainable size.
    4. Bachelor (Advanced) programs should allow for permeability, so that students can join in their second year as an alternative pathway, subject to relevant 'transfer' criteria.
    5. Program Coordinators will be responsible for the development of students' extracurricular activities such as peer mentoring, volunteering, school visits and/or online blogging.
    6. Bachelor (Advanced) students will be encouraged to attend staff research seminars as well as invited to attend Research Tuesday lectures.
    7. Students from Bachelor (Advanced) programs will be encouraged to participate in, and develop, a cross disciplinary understanding of unique enhanced skills.

    Notes

    1. Minimum standards - Minimum standards for Bachelor (Advanced) programs are minimum standards only and faculties may add additional criteria to these programs following a submission to, and recommendation from, the Program Approval and Entry Committee (PAEC).
    2. GPA - Academic Board agreed that if a student's GPA fell below 5.0 (Principle 3) in their final semester they would graduate with the Advanced degree rather than being forced to take out the bachelor award.
  • Majors

    One of the key features of the Undergraduate Curriculum Structures Framework is that all undergraduate programs must include the equivalent of a major consisting of courses to the value of 24 units, with a minimum of normally 12 units to be presented at Level III/Advanced Level.

    Principles and Guidelines have been developed to provide additional guidance on majors as required by the UCSFWP’s Report.

    Principles

    • Majors are designed to provide students with depth of knowledge within the discipline and prepare students for Honours, postgraduate study or professional employment in cognate or similar fields.
    • Majors are comprised of a set of courses that together form a coherent body of knowledge within a discipline or sub-discipline.
    • Majors must have a distinctive disciplinary rationale underpinned by substantial research expertise and this should be reflected in the courses and any requirements for the major.
    • Majors must identify all requirements for completion, including any extra mural work, practical or clinical placements.

    Guidelines

    • Majors shall consist of courses to the value of 24 units with a minimum of normally 12 units to be presented at Advanced level or in the final year studies. Approval for reasonable alternative structures (for example, 6-9-9) may be proposed to the Program Approval and Entry Committee.
    • The content differentiation is normally 9 units at Level III/Advanced level, unless the major is sufficiently differentiated from any other major to ensure students are provided with a unique experience.
    • The sequence of courses that make up the major should have academic coherence and progression of cognitive, technical and communications skills.
    • Majors may be separate from the core requirements for a program.
    • Majors may include all or some of the unique content for named degrees.
    • Majors must include capstone courses/experiences.
  • Broadening Electives

    A requirement of the Undergraduate Curriculum Structures Framework is the introduction of 9 units of Broadening Electives in all undergraduate programs, unless an equivalent broadening experience is provided to students through other means.

    Broadening Electives are intended to provide students with the opportunity to take courses from outside of their academic program and add breadth to their undergraduate experience. Broadening Electives must be taken from Subject Areas outside of the academic program in which the student is enrolled. Subject Areas have been identified for each undergraduate programs and are listed in the document available from the link below.

    As Subject Areas have now been identified for each program it is expected that Broadening Electives will be progressively introduced into each program at the time that one of the following occurs:

    • The program is submitted to the PAEC for revision; or
    • The program is formally reviewed by the University.

    All programs must be fully compliant with all requirements of the UCSF by 1 January 2018. If Faculties/Schools wish to introduce Broadening Electives before they are required, their introduction must comply with the requirements for Broadening Electives within programs, i.e. there must be 9 units of courses that are taken from outside of the Subject Areas that have been determined for the program.

    Although a list of Subject Areas has been determined for each program it is possible to vary these on application to PAEC. The application to vary the Subject Areas should be made when a program proposal is submitted for revision of the program or when the program is formally reviewed.

    Whilst some exemptions may be granted on academic grounds, it should be noted that Broadening Electives are both broadening and elective. The requirements for Broadening Electives may also be satisfied if a student undertakes approved study abroad, even if the courses they take are in the same discipline.

  • Capstones

    The Undergraduate Curriculum Structures Framework identified the need to ensure that undergraduate programs remain relevant to students and employers and provide the opportunity to build on research strengths and skills that can be applied to future study or employment. The introduction of capstone experiences in all undergraduate programs from 2015 was an objective of The Beacon of Enlightenment: Operational Plan 2013. Capstones will also ensure the University's program structures align with the requirements of the Australian Qualifications Framework and the Higher Education Standards Framework.

    In order to provide guidance in the development and design of capstones the Program Approval and Entry Committee developed the following principles for capstone experiences.

    Capstones should:

    1. Focus on developing essential academic practice skills and understanding that enable the application of previously covered content, such as:
      1. Analytical skills
      2. Critical thinking skills
      3. Planning and organising skills
      4. Researching skills
      5. Writing skills
      6. Communication and presentation skills.
    1. Enable every student to identify the skills and knowledge gained through their program of study and develop their confidence in their ability to apply these skills and knowledge to solve problems that simulate professional practice or research.
    1. Facilitate student transition to future study or work and:
      1. Clearly articulate their aim (e.g. to enhance critical thinking, problem solving and decision making within the context of their discipline, to provide the skills or, to meet the standards required for accreditation necessary for employment);
      2. Clearly identify their context (e.g. to bring together three years of study in Science majoring in Molecular Biology); and
      3. Clearly identify their learning outcomes (e.g. to provide leadership and communication skills relevant to the legal profession).
    1. Be structured to fit around the minimum number of hours identified in the equivalent units for courses outlined in the minimum structured learning activities required under the Coursework Academic Programs Policy.
    1. Form part of the student's progression and be delivered in the final year of a program.
    1. Be delivered through, but not limited to, a range of experiences such as:
      1. Academic Courses
      2. Internships
      3. Case Studies
      4. Research Projects
      5. Field Work/Clinical Trials
      6. Role playing or simulated work place activities
      7. Study Abroad.

    For all capstone experiences the link between the capstone and research must be clearly identified, with each experience identifying the research, analytical, writing, critical thinking and other skills developed in each capstone to ensure that these, and other experiences, provide outcomes for students consistently across the different experiences. Without meeting all of these requirements experiences such as study abroad are not considered, of themselves, sufficient to qualify as a capstone.

    1. Be informed by the University's Graduate Attributes.

    These principles are intended to provide a structure that will guide capstone design and development without stifling creative or novel approaches for individual program capstones. It is expected that current courses that are identified as capstones, which do not satisfy the principles above, will be revised to align with the principles. It should also be noted that capstones, as with other program developments, must comply with all relevant University policies.

    The principles were approved by Academic Board at meeting 7/14.

  • Unique Content

    The report of the Undergraduate Curriculum Structures Framework Working Party stated that named degrees would provide students with a unique experience including unique content and that unique content for named degrees was determined to be at least 9 units of courses that are not available to students in any other program.

    To assist faculties and schools in the development of unique content for undergraduate programs the Program Approval and Entry Committee (PAEC) developed the following principle:

    • All academic undergraduate programs should be differentiated by at least 9 units of unique content unless the program is sufficiently differentiated from any other program to ensure students are provided with a unique experience.

    The principle was approved by Academic Board at meeting 5/14.

  • Small Group Discovery Experience

    The Small Group Discovery Experience (SGDE) will engage students in the intellectual challenge of the scholarship of discovery, giving them the opportunity to develop skills of research and to engage actively with the content of the discipline.

    By adopting and generalising the SGDE, the University aims to uphold the value of the scholarship of discovery, as defined by Boyer as "the commitment to knowledge for its own sake", and "the following, in a disciplined fashion, an investigation wherever it may led". The University affirms the SGDE as an intrinsic defining feature of its pedagogy, in every year of all of its programs.

    Each faculty and discipline area will translate the following principles and guidelines into the design of their curriculum.

    Principles of the Small Group Discovery Experience:

    • Students are actively engaged with the content and an experienced academic.
    • The Small Group Discovery Experience will enrich the on-campus experience.
    • The scholarship of discovery is central to the learning activities of the University.
    • The first year SGDE sets the foundation for a continuum of the scholarship of discovery.
    • It will be a core component in a credit-bearing course of every undergraduate program.

    Guidelines of the Small Group Discovery Experience:

    • The SGDE will be led by experienced academics.
    • It will involve an active participation by students.
    • It will be based on a formal collaboration between the students and academic.
    • It will be part of every first year level of any undergraduate program from 2014.
    • The SGDE will involve at least two face-to-face encounters with the academic per course.
    • The size of group will be determined by what will deliver the optimal learning outcomes deemed appropriate by the discipline.
  • Exemptions to the Undergraduate Curriculum Structures Framework

    The following table provides a list of the exemptions to the Undergraduate Curriculum Structures Framework. An exemption to this framework may only be granted following a submission to the Program Approval and Entry Committee.

    Program Structure Exemption
    Majors No exemption will be granted on academic grounds.

    All Bachelor degrees, including Named degrees, require the equivalent of a Major consisting of courses to the value of 24 units, with a minimum of normally 12 units to be presented at Level III/Advanced level.
    Broadening Electives All bachelor degrees, including named degrees, require the inclusion of a minimum of 9 units of Broadening Electives to be designated by Subject Area and taken in a Subject Area outside of the program, unless an equivalent broadening experience is provided to students through other means. The designation of the Subject Areas to be recommended for approval in accord with the Program Development and Approval processes, are specified from time to time by the Program Approval and Entry Committee.
    (Formally approved Study Abroad and Exchange opportunities taken for credit may be counted in lieu of Broadening Electives.)

    Exemptions from the requirement to include a minimum of 9 units of Broadening Electives will be considered by the Program Approval and Entry Committee on the following grounds:
    Accreditation Requirements
    Many of the University’s academic programs are accredited by professional organisations. In some instances these organisations are also responsible for the registration of graduates which will enable them to practice professionally. Where particular learning outcomes/graduate attributes are prescribed by these organisations as a minimum requirement to prepare graduates for professional practice, these may be grounds for an exemption to the undergraduate program structures. In acknowledging these requirements, consideration of an exemption should only be on the basis that for graduates to achieve the required learning outcomes or graduate attributes the addition of Broadening Electives to the content of the program is not possible. Accredited programs which are not a minimum requirement for registration for professional practice should not be exempted on this ground.
    Exemptions on this ground should also be considered in the context of whether or not there are conversion master’s programs that will enable graduates gain registration. If a master’s graduate can complete the required content following successful completion of two years of study, the question has to be asked as to why the bachelor degree cannot include Broadening Electives.
    Benchmarking
    There should be benchmarking of similar programs offered locally and nationally (and internationally if relevant) to determine whether Broadening Electives are routinely included for the other programs.
    Interdisciplinary Degrees
    Interdisciplinary degrees may already contain sufficient broadening but this should be demonstrated as part of any program proposal.
    Graduate Entry only Degrees
    Bachelor degrees that have restricted admission criteria to graduates that hold a bachelor degree (from another discipline) could be considered to have met the requirement for Broadening Electives.
    Study Abroad and Exchange
    Formally approved Study Abroad and Exchange opportunities are taken for credit.
    Availability of Courses
    A full range of courses may not be available at the Roseworthy, Waite and Singapore campuses.
    Academic Literacy and Research Skills No exemption will be granted on academic grounds.

    Academic literacy and research skills are considered to be essential features of a University of Adelaide degree.
    Unique Content All academic programs should be differentiated by at least 9 units of unique content unless the program is sufficiently differentiated from any other program to ensure students are provided with a unique experience.
    Capstones No exemption will be granted on academic grounds.

Standards for Honours Programs

  • Honours Unitisation

    The recommendations of the Honours Working Party (HWP) were approved by the Vice-Chancellor and President on the recommendation of Academic Board in September 2012.

    Following a review of end-on Honours programs, the following guidelines for unitisation were approved by Academic Board at meeting 5/15 on 5 August 2015 to be effective from 1 January 2016.

    1. The minimum research content for end-on Honours programs is 9 units and the maximum research content is 18 units.
    2. Students may undertake the research component in two consecutive semesters.
    3. Marks for individual courses in Honours programs are to be awarded using a single Mark Scheme and these marks are to be reflected on academic transcripts.
    4. A new single Mark Scheme is to be developed for Honours and that:
      • Descriptors are clearly articulated for the new Mark Scheme 11;
      • Marks are awarded based on these Descriptors and are not referenced back to the cohort;
      • Marks are provided to students;
      • the Mark Scheme and its Descriptors are clearly articulated to students; and
      • appropriate levels of feedback are provided in the unitised courses.
    5. The final Honours Grade calculation is to be based on a weighted average of overall marks obtained for each of the component courses comprising the Honours year; each overall mark is to be weighted by the unit value of the course.
    6. The Honours GPA is calculated using a standard program GPA calculation by assigning a value of 1-7 according to the final mark for each course and then multiplying that value by the unit value for the course in which it was awarded. The sum of these values is divided by the total unit value of the completed courses to give a final GPA. [This is the standard program GPA calculation at the University of Adelaide].

    Grade Descriptors

    Grade descriptors developed by a Working Group were considered by the University Learning Committee on 14 October 2015 and subsequently approved by Academic Board at meeting 8/15 on 4 November 2015.

    Mark Scheme 11 and the Grade Descriptors can be accessed from the Assessment for Coursework Programs Policy.

Standards for Postgraduate Programs

  • Standards for Postgraduate Programs
    1. All Masters (Coursework) and Masters (Extended) programs will include one of the following:
      1. A research project; or
      2. A clinical placement, internship or other capstone experience; or
      3. A substantial piece of scholarship.
      If a program does not include an easily identifiable research project/capstone experience, a case will need to be presented to PAEC demonstrating that the program meets AQF requirements.
    2. The Research Project or Clinical Placement, Internship or other Capstone Experience will conform to the following criteria:
      1. It will be a minimum of 6 units.
      2. If it is 6 units, it cannot be stand alone and it must build on one or more of the courses within the program.
      3. Accreditation requirements may be used as justification for it being 6 units but it must still build on the courses within the program.
      4. If it is 9 units or more it may be stand alone.
      5. The workload will be commensurate with that specified in the Coursework Academic Programs Policy.
    3. Capstone experiences must be undertaken at the end of the program and not spread throughout the program. All capstone experiences must include a requirement that students produce a written piece of work that is a critical evaluation and reflection of the experience not simply a log book of the experience.

    It is a requirement of the AQF that all Masters Degree (Coursework) graduates will have knowledge of research principles and methods, and undertake some independent research. It should be noted that project work or practice-related learning are alternatives to each other, not alernatives to research.

  • Masters programs – Extension and Conversion programs

    Two types of Masters (Coursework) programs are offered by the University – Extension and Conversion programs. To assist Faculties and Schools in the development and ongoing management of Masters programs, the Program Approval and Entry Committee (PAEC) has developed a series of principles and guidelines that will be applied to Masters programs when making decisions related to the volume of learning outcomes that are necessary for each type of program.

    The following principles and guidelines developed by PAEC are based on expectations and standards set by TEQSA and the AQF Council.

    Guidelines

    1. Masters (Coursework) programs must be designated as either conversion or extension programs.
    2. A conversion program is one that seeks to 'convert' students from one discipline to another rather than further develop their knowledge of their undergraduate discipline.
    3. An extension Masters is one that intends to extend the students skills, understanding and knowledge in the same discipline as their undergraduate degree.
    4. The Volume of Learning for a Conversion Masters is typically:
      1. 2 years in duration if the minimum requirement for entry is an AQF Level 7 qualification in any discipline; or
      2. 1.5 years if the minimum entry requirement is an AQF Level 8 qualification in any discipline.
    5. The Volume of Learning for an Extension Masters is typically:
      1. 1.5 years in duration if the minimum entry requirement is an AQF Level 7 qualification; or
      2. 1 year if the minimum entry requirement is an AQF Level 8 qualification.

    Principles

    1. Masters (Coursework) programs that are identified as either Conversion or Extension Masters can be of less duration than that specified in 4 and 5a above but a case must be made to demonstrate that the components that make up the program, in its entirety, have learning outcomes that are at AQF Level 9. It would be expected that the components of a program delivered in less than the typical duration would be predominantly or entirely at AQF Level 9.
    2. The use of content that is also used for undergraduate programs is acceptable but the learning outcomes must be at AQF Level 9 and this must be reflected in the teaching and assessment for the program.
    3. Minimum entry requirements should not be used as the basis for granting credit within any Masters program. For example, a Bachelor degree is the minimum entry requirement for Masters programs and credit would not be expected to be granted for any AQF Level 7 awards unless the undergraduate courses have outcomes and assessments which are equivalent to the learning outcomes and assessments required in the AQF Level 9 program.
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