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Seminars, Meetings and Events

Events | Seminars | Meetings

Events

PIRR 2017

When: 20-21  September 2017

Where: The Hub, University of Adelaide

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Call for Abstracts

Past Events

PIRR 2016


When: 28-29 September 2016

Where: The Hub, University of Adelaide

Registration

Program

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STAP-ISAR 2016


Tuesday 2nd August

PIRR 2015

When: 23-24 September 2015

Where: The University of Adelaide

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Call for registrations

PIRR 2014

Details

When: 24-25 September 2014

Where: The University of Adelaide

Past Seminars

Meter wave radar for the detection of RCS reduced targets

Details:

When: 11:00, Monday 4th February 2013
Where: University of Adelaide, Ingkarni Wardli (formerly Innova 21) building, 5.57
Who: Dr. Daniel O'Hagan from  Fraunhofer FHR Franhoufer in Germany

Biography:

Dr. Daniel W. O'Hagan is a research scientist at the Fraunhofer Institute for High
Frequency Physics and Radar Techniques - FHR in Germany.  His research is primarily
in the area of Passive Bistatic Radar (PBR). Additional research interests ancillary
to PBR include VHF radar, antenna array design and beamforming, LPI techniques,
low-observable platform design, and bistatic clutter.

Dr. O'Hagan is the German national representative to, and chairman of, the NATO
Advanced Modelling and Systems Applications for Passive Sensors group (SET-164).  He
has led extensive research programmes concerning bistatic clutter analysis and
studies to determine the suitability of passive radar for particular surveillance
roles. He has a Ph.D. from University College London.

 

Overview of Defence Systems Innovation Centre, projects and research currently being undertaken within the DSIC JV partnership.

Details:

When: 16:10, Thursday 13th September 2012 
Where: University of Adelaide, Ingkarni Wardli (formerly Innova 21) building, 5.57
Who:Dr Sanjay Mazumdar

Abstract:

The Defence Systems Innovation Centre (DSIC) is a national joint venture established to help Defence and Industry to address some of these challenges associated with Defence's strategy of a networked battlespace by drawing upon the advanced research and education capability in Systems Engineering, Network Communications and Information Management in the University of South Australia, University of Adelaide, University of NSW and international partners such as the Software Engineering Institute at the Carnegie Mellon University. This seminar will provide an overview of DSIC and focus on some of the projects and research currently being undertaken within the DSIC JV partnership.

Modelling Multi-Scale Physiology

Details:

When: 15:00, Thursday 12th July 2012
Where: University of Adelaide, Ingkarni Wardli (formerly Innova 21) building, 5.57
Who:Prof Tim David, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

Abstract:

There are a significant number of problems that exhibit a large range of physical scales, for example small vortex generators positioned on large scale aerofoils; but none so prominent in the 21st Century as that exemplified within the biological sciences and engineering. Biological Engineering problems have a multitude of physical scales. In the major arterial networks the blood flow dynamic scales are of the order of 1mm (cerebral vessels) up to 25mm (ascending aorta).

Downstream of any major vessel exists a substantial network of arteries, arterioles and capillaries whose characteristic length scales reach the order of 10­20 microns. Within the walls of these cylindrical vessels lie ion channels consisting of proteins (100 nanometers and smaller) folded in such a way as to allow only certain molecules through the membrane. Taking examples from cerebral perfusion and arterial coupled cell function this talk will look at a range of ways in which multi­scale problems can be investigated. Our big question that has yet to be answered is in different models that highlight different scales do all the models provide essentially the same answer? There are a significant number of problems that exhibit a large range of physical scales, for example small vortex generators positioned on large scale aerofoils; but none so prominent in the 21st Century as that exemplified within the biological sciences and engineering. Biological Engineering problems have a multitude of physical scales. In the major arterial networks the blood flow dynamic scales are of the order of 1mm (cerebralvessels) up to 25mm (ascending aorta). Downstream of any major vessel exists a substantial network of arteries, arterioles and capillaries whose characteristic length scales reach the order of 10­20 microns. Within the walls of these cylindrical vessels lie ion channels consisting of proteins (100 nanometers and smaller) folded in such a way as to allow only certain molecules through the membrane. Taking examples from cerebral perfusion and arterial coupled cell function this talk will look at a range of ways in which multi­scale problems can be investigated. Our big question that has yet to be answered is in different models that highlight different scales do all the models provide essentially the same answer?

GPS interference localisation systems

Details

When: 16:00, Thursday 129h July 2012
Where: University of Adelaide, Ingkarni Wardli (formerly Innova 21) building, 5.57
Who: Mr M Trinkle.

Abstract:

This talk will presents results from a recent trial which was set up to localise interferences int eh GPS bandwidth. Three antenna arrays were set up and the data collected from the antenna arrays was used to determine the location of a weak interference source. The data collected from each antenna array was synchronised using a GPS timing receiver.

The main measurements used to locaise the interference were: The Direction Of Arrival (DOA) of the interference signal at each antenna array and the time Difference Of Arrival (TDOA) os the signal at each of the three antenna arrays. The antenna arrays were also used to steer a beam at the interference to improve the SNR and hence the TDOA result.

 

SuperDARN Past, Present and Future.

Details:

When: 16:00, Thursday 14th June 2012
Where: University of Adelaide, Ingkarni Wardli (formerly Innova 21) building, 5.55
Who:Mr J Whittington, La Trobe University, Melbourne

Abstract:

In 1983 Professor Ray Greenwald and his team from the Applied Physical Laboratory at Johns Hopkins University constructed an HF ionospheric radar at Goose Bay, Canada. This radar was designed specifically for the study of large-scale ionospheric convection, and was the first in what would become a network of similarly designed and operated radars around the world known as SuperDARN. The SuperDARN (Super Dual Auroral Radar Network) network now extends to nearly 30 HF radars operated by a range of international university and scientific institutions with a common aim of facilitating global study of the Earth's ionosphere and interaction with the space environment (Space Weather). While the radars have been primarily developed to study the existence and motion charged particles in the ionosphere (particularly at high-latitudes), they can detect Meteor scatter and Sea scatter, via iospheric reflection, with potential for determination of sea state. In this semin we look at some of the history of SuperDARN, present uses, and potential future directions, particularly concerning the new digital TIGER-3 radar being installed at Buckland Park, Adelaide later this year.

 

Remote sensing in the Bureau of Meteorology - how does radar contribute?

Details

When: 16:00, Thursday 10 May 2012 
Where: University of Adelaide, Ingkarni Wardli (formerly Innova 21) building, 5.57
Who:John Nairn,  Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology

Abstract

Modern meteorological and hydrological services are highly reliant upon remote sensing to create a Basic Composite Observation System.

Rainfall intensity, distribution and accumulation weather watch radar, cloud base and visibility from lidar, upper wind structure from wind profilers are valuable data types, particularly when paired with other environmental data. How the Bureau converts this data into information for Numerical Weather Prediction models, weather forecasters and their products and the general public will be discussed.

 

Statistical Analysis of Simultaneously Collected Monostatic and Bistatic Sea Clutter

Details

When: 16:00 Thursday March 8th, 2012
Where: Room 5.56 Innova 21 Blg
Who: Dr Waddah Al-Ashwal
ARC Research Fellow
University of Adelaide Radar Research Centre

Abstract

There is a growing interest in bistatic radars; however, such systems cannot reach their full potential unless the designer has a proper understanding of the environment in which they operate. Rather little information has been published on bistatic clutter and out-of-plane bistatic sea clutter in particular. This is due to a number of factors including the inherent complexity of conducting bistatic radar trials and the resulting lack of high quality bistatic data. Monostatic sea clutter can be very spiky, i.e. the probability density function of the amplitude describing the clutter has a long tail. This is particularly true at low grazing angles, high seas and horizontal polarisation. The longer tail of the probability density function of spiky clutter increases the probability of false alarm which could be detrimental to the radar performance. This is particularly true at horizontal polarisation. Studies of land bistatic SAR images suggested that the amplitude statistics of the clutter were shorter tailed in bistatic SAR compared to monostatic SAR. The same could be true for sea clutter. The data used in this study was collected in the Western Cape in South Africa using UCL coherent netted radar system (NetRAD). The data analysed covered both vertical and horizontal polarisation as well as a cross-polar measurement. It covered both a low sea state and a high sea state, in both the antennas had a low grazing angle and the bistatic angle was changed by rotating the antennas in azimuth. The amplitude statistics of the monostatic and bistatic sea clutter are analysed, by fitting the intensity to five different distributions. The spikiness of the clutter was studied by analysing the time histories and the parameters of the KA distribution.

 

Optimal waveform design for radar in the presence of Doppler

Details

When: 4.00pm Tuesday Nov 29, 2011
Where: Room 5.58 Innova 21 Blg
Who: Dr Stephen Howard

Abstract

Optimal radar waveform design for target detection has been addressed in prior research literature under various assumptions regarding noise and clutter. A common model of the radar scene in work of this kind is a linear time-invariant operator with additive Gaussian noise that acts on the transmitted signal to produce the received signal. This model is intrinsically ill-suited to dynamic scenes or moving radar platforms because it cannot account for Doppler. This paper introduces scene models based on Hilbert-Schmidt (HS) operators on the space of finite-energy signals. This category of models generalizes the LTI category in the sense that every LTI operator is also a HS operator, but the HS class includes operators that account for frequency shifts as well as time shifts and are thus suitable for modeling radar scenes involving Doppler. Every HS operator is uniquely expressible as a superposition of elementary time and frequency shift operators, thus providing a convenient interpretation of a scene in terms of these physically meaningful operations on the transmitted signal. Application of this perspective to waveform design for target detection in noise and to optimal receiver processing for a given waveform for target detection in clutter and noise are demonstrated.

 

Radar, where did it come from?

Details

When: 4.00pm Tuesday Oct 18, 2011
Where: Room 5.57 Innova 21 Blg
Who: Professor Don Sinnott

Abstract

Radar is an electronic system and its appearance was paced by progress in the understanding of electromagnetic theory and electronic technology development. The theoretical underpinnings of electromagnetic theory by Maxwell, the demonstrations of radio-wave phenomenology by Hertz and vacuum tube technology development in the twentieth century were critical items on the path before radar sets could be produced. The presentation will trace this chain of development through some of the key people involved, from the first radar demonstrations in 1904, through British, US and Australian World War 2 developments to current Australian over-the-horizon development.

 

Guidance of Autonomous Arial Vehicles with On-Board Sensors

Details

When: 2.10pm Monday July 18, 2011
Where: Room 5.57 Innova 21 Blg
Who: Professor Edwin Chong - Colorado State University

Abstract

We consider the problem of planning the motion of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) with on-board sensors, with the goal of tracking ground targets. We apply the theory of partially observable Markov decision processes (POMDPs) to this problem. While POMDPs are intractable to optimize exactly, principled approximation methods can be devised based on Bellman's principle. We show how application -specific approximations produces a practical design that coordinates the UAVs to achieve good long-tem mean squared-error tracking performance in the presence of occlusions and dynamic constraints.

 

Mode-Selective MIMO Over-the-Horizon Radar:

Details

When: 4.00pm Tuesday June  21, 2011
Where: Room 5.57 Innova 21 Blg
Who: Dr Grodon Frazer

Abstract

DSTO is developing the next generation Over-the-Horizon Radar (OTHR). One element of the work is to improve the detection and tracking performance of slow moving objects such as ships on the ocean surface. Slow object detection and tracking is limited in current OTHR during periods of ionospheric multi-mode propagation and in cases of ionospehric spread - Dopplet clutter. The two phenomenon often occur concurrently. Mode selective OTHR is a recently introduced concept that uses two-dimensional transmit and receive apertures and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar techniques to preferentially select good ionospheric propagation modes and reject poor propagation modes and hence improve surface object detection and tracking performance. The presentation will cover our MIMO radar work and in particular discuss a recent experimental campaign that has applied MIMO radar techniques to demonstrate ionospheric mode selection on a one-way ionospheric transmission path. This is the difficult part of the full two-way radar backscatter case and hence an important step in realising Mode - Selective OTHR.

 

Acquisition and Processing of 3D and Hyperspectral Images

Details

When: 10am Tuesday Feb 8, 2011
Where: Room 5.56 Innova 21 Blg
Who: Prof. Mingyi HE
Northwestern Polytechnical University
E-mail: myhe@nwpu.edu.cn

Abstract

In recent years, remotely measuring and processing of 3D and hyperspectral images are increased interesting areas in information acquisition and processing and related disciplines. Remote Sensing is the science and art of obtaining information about an object, area, size, or phenomenon through the analysis and processing of image data acquired by devices that is not contact with the object, area, or phenomenon under the investigation. With the rapid development of hardware and software technology, hyperspectral and 3D laser remote sensing imaging technology have become the most important means of photoelectric remote sensing. With such high dimensional data it will be possible to obtain deeper and more accurate information on objectives and their environment, which are of great potential values in scientific remote sensing, lunar observation, deep-space exploration, environmental inspection, earth observation etc. In this talk, a brief overview of research work in Shaanxi Provincial Key Lab. of Information Acquisition and Processing on 3D measurement with laser and hyperspectral sensing and their image processing will be presented, including, 1) 3D measurement, data processing and applications; 2) hyperspectral image processing (including compression, fusion, feature exaction and band selection, classification and unmixing.

 

Recent Developments on Radar Signal Propagation Analysis Techniques for Frequencies from MHz to GHz

Details

When: 4pm Tuesday Dec 7, 2010
Where: Room 5.57 Innova 21 Blg
Who: Prof. Chris Coleman
School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering
University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia, 5005
E-mail: ccoleman@eleceng.adelaide.edu.au

Abstract

The understanding of propagation is extremely important to the successful operation of all radar. In the case of HF radar, it can be critical to the success of these radars. This talk will start with a discussion of some Kirchhoff integral ideas that have been fruitful for analyzing propagation in the case of microwave radar and show how these have been recently extended to enable the analysis of propagation at HF frequencies.  HF frequencies have more traditionally been analysed using raytracing techniques and the talk will also discuss some very recent developments that allow a new approach to point to point raytracing that could have significant benefits for the coordinate registration problem in HF skywave radar.

 

From Add Squarers to MIMO - A Brief History of Phased Arrays and Array Processing

Details

When: 4pm Tuesday Oct 12, 2010
Where: Room 5.57 Innova 21 Blg
Who: Prof Doug Gray
Link: From Add Squarers to MIMO

Ground based radar for observations of the atmosphere

Details

When: 3pm Tuesday Sept 31, 2010
Where: Room 5.58 Innova 21 Blg
Who: Iain REID†,‡
†ATRAD Pty Ltd, 1/26 Stirling Street,
Thebarton, Australia, 5031
‡School of Chemistry & Physics
University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia, 5005
E-mail: †ireid@atrad.com.au, ‡iain.reid@adelaide.edu.au

Abstract

Radar is used to make measurements of the dynamics and structure of the atmosphere by detecting irregularities in refractive index due to variations in humidity and temperature in the lower atmosphere (0 - 20 km), and due to variations due to fluctuations in electron density in the Mesosphere Lower Thermosphere (MLT) region of the upper atmosphere (50 - 110 km). In the upper atmosphere, irregularities in electron density are produced by turbulence, wave motions, by natural production processes such as photoionization, and by meteor infall. These fluctuations in refractive index are used as tracers for the motion of the mean wind and for turbulence and wave motions. Radars operating in the MF, HF and VHF bands are typically used to investigate this part of the atmosphere. Wind Profiling Radars operating in the lower VHF band have been used for about 25 years to investigate the Stratosphere Troposphere (ST) region, but only routinely in the last 15 years. Considerable development has occurred in all atmospheric radar classes within the past decade and many are used operationally. For example, a number of rocket launch sites now utilize Wind Profilers for launch support and they are becoming increasingly common for airport operations. Here we provide a very brief overview of the history of atmospheric radar and of recent developments.


Meetings