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  • Meningococcal B Vaccine Study for Toddlers

    The Vaccinology and Immunology Research Trials Unit (VIRTU) at the Women’s and Children’s Hospital are conducting a study to evaluate the safety, tolerability and immune response of a potential vaccine  against meningococcal B disease.

    Meningococcal disease is a severe and rapid-onset infection which can result in death within hours, due to septicaemia (blood poisoning) or meningitis (inflammation of the membrane lining of the brain and spinal cord). The meningococcus bacteria is carried, usually harmlessly, in the nose and throat of around 10% of the population (‘carriers’), with higher carriage in some specific groups. The bacteria are passed from person-to-person by close prolonged contact with fine droplets spread by coughing, sneezing and spluttering. However, only a very small number of people in close contact with carriers develop meningococcal disease. Even though it is hard to catch and uncommon, meningococcal disease can be a serious illness for those who are infected.

    Participants will need to visit the Women’s and Children’s Hospital 8 times over an 18-month period and some participants will be asked to do further follow-up with yearly blood draws for 3 years longer. Study vaccines will be provided at no cost and you will be provided with a voucher for your travel expenses.

    We are seeking healthy toddlers 18 months to less than 24 months of age to take part in this meningococcal B vaccine study.

    To register your interest or for more information, contact VIRTU at the Women’s and Children’s Hospital on (08) 8161 8117.

    This study has been approved by the Women’s and Children’s Health Network Human Ethics Committee.

  • Uncovering the causes of Cerebral Palsy study

    Approximately 1 in every 500 children is born with cerebral palsy.

    It is now recognised that most cases are associated with factors present before labour begins, and not as a result of events which occur during labour and delivery.

    What actually causes cerebral palsy is not clear. In order to determine these factors, it is important to conduct research into the possible causes of cerebral palsy.

    More information.

  • ENDIA Study: Why are more children getting type 1 diabetes?

    Type 1 diabetes in children is twice as common as it was 20 years ago. This is because the environment has changed and this has made it more likely that children will develop type 1 diabetes.

    If we can understand what factors in the environment are harmful or protective, and how they interact with our genes, we can modify the environment to try to prevent type 1 diabetes.

    The ENDIA study is Australia's biggest type 1 diabetes study and is aiming to recruite 1,400 people to discover the environmental triggers for this disease.

    More information.

  • Metformin and dietary advice to improve insulin sensitivity and promote Gestational Restriction of Weight in pregnant women who are overweight or obese: the GRoW randomised trial

    Women who are overweight or obese at the start of their pregnancy are more likely to have larger babies. This is probably because glucose and insulin are not handled adequately, leading to what is known as insulin resistance. Metformin is a medication that may modify the risk of large babies in pregnancy for these women. Metformin is used to treat diabetes and gestational diabetes; it increases insulin sensitivity and inhibits gluconeogenesis in the liver.

    Women will be randomly allocated to receive metformin or an identical placebo tablet. All women in the study will receive nutrition and exercise counseling from a dietitian as well as ultrasounds at 28 weeks and 36 weeks.

    Who is eligible?
    Any pregnant women who meet the following criteria:

    - A body mass index (BMI) of 25kg/m2 or more*
    - Less than 20 weeks pregnant
    - A singleton pregnancy (not twins or triplets)
    - Does not have diabetes (previous gestational diabetes is ok)
    - Does not have significant liver or kidney impairment
    - Is planning to birth at:
           - Women's and Children's Hospital
           - Flinders Medical Centre
           - Lyell McEwin Hospital

    *BMI is calculated by your weight divided by your height in metres squared. ie if you weighed 70kg and were 1.65m tall your BMI = 70 / 1.65 / 1.65 = 25.7.

    More information
    8161 8427
    0437 797 743 (SMS only)
    grow@adelaide.edu.au

  • OPTimising gestational weight gain and Improving Maternal and Infant health outcomes through antenatal dietary lifeStyle and Exercise advice: the OPTIMISE randomised trial

    It is normal to gain weight during pregnancy, gaining too much or too little weight can result in an increased risk of adverse outcomes including medical complications, labour & birth complications and adverse infant health outcomes. Gaining too much weight during pregnancy can make it more difficult for women to return to their pre-pregnancy weight after their baby is born.

    We are conducting a study that is looking to see if providing dietary, lifestyle and exercise advice to women who start their pregnancy in the healthy weight range can optimise their weight gain, and improve health outcomes for themselves and their babies.

    Women will be randomly allocated to receive access to dietary and lifestyle advice or continue to receive standard antenatal care. All women in the study will be offered ultrasounds at 28 weeks and 36 weeks.

    Who is eligible?
    Any pregnant women who meet the following criteria:

    - A body mass index (BMI) between18.4kg/m2-25.0kg/m2*
    - Less than 20 weeks pregnant
    - A singleton pregnancy (not twins or triplets)
    - Does not have diabetes (previous gestational diabetes is ok)
    - Is planning to birth at the Women's and Children's Hospital

    *BMI is calculated by your weight divided by your height in metres squared. ie if you weighed 70kg and were 1.65m tall your BMI = 70 / 1.65 / 1.65 = 25.7.

    More information
    8161 8427
    0437 797 743 (SMS only)
    optimise@adelaide.edu.au

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