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Current Student Information

Welcome to Roseworthy campus and the School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences.

The following information provides current students with critical information and support while studying at Roseworthy. This information has been divided up into the following sections:

Please take the time to review this information.

  • Before Semester BeginsStudent Checklist
    Read the Vaccination and Zoonotics Diseases Information document

    Review the Academic key dates

    Check your enrolment details
    • Ensure your contact details are up to date on your Access Adelaide account
    • Your enrolment must match the Program Rules stated for your program
    • Check your enrolment each semester to ensure that you are enrolled in the correct courses
    Check your University email account regularly
    • Check your student email account regularly for notifications and information as this is the main communication method for staff to communicate with students
    • It is the student’s responsibility to check their email regularly and to remove unnecessary messages routinely to ensure that the mailbox is not full and new messages can be received.
    • Email safety
    • You can forward your University email to another account using Webmail
    Review each Course Outline
    • Ensure you are aware of assessment items and any hurdles. Any questions speak to the Course Co-ordinator
    • Check what equipment you need for this course (e.g. dissection kit, stethoscope)
    Check your timetable to ensure it is correct
    Review what text book you need
    • Refer to the Course Outline or relevant MyUni page for any required or recommended references
    • Books can be purchased through UniBooks
    • The Library also holds numerous references
    Check your assignment due dates
    • Review Course Outline or MyUni course site for any due dates or changes
    Purchasing Protective Equipment, Medical Supplies & Stationary
    • The Adelaide University Union operates an on-campus shop for students at the Roseworthy Campus.
    • The shop will stock stationery items, basic grocery items, overalls, waterproof bib and brace overalls, lab coats, University merchandise and clothing as well as various medical supplies, e.g. Stethoscopes, veterinarian dissection kits, thermometers.
    • Binding and photocopying facilities are also available.
    • Monday to Friday 10:00am – 4:00pm. Ph. 08 8313 1450, email: tracey.granger@adelaide.edu.au
  • During the SemesterStudent Checklist

    Check your University email account regularly

    • Check your student email account regularly for notifications and information as this is the main communication method for staff to communicate with students
    • It is the student’s responsibility to check their email regularly and to remove unnecessary messages routinely to ensure that the mailbox is not full and new messages can be received.
    • Email safety
    • See forward your University email to another account using Webmail

    Check your assignment due dates

    • Review Course Outline or MyUni course site for any due dates or changes

    Submitting Assignments

    • Familiarise yourself with how assignments are to be submitted (hardcopy or electronically)
    • For Roseworthy based courses the Assignment box is based in the Williams Building (Roseworthy Campus).
    • A signed coversheet must be included in hard copy assignments submitted. Coversheets are also available in the Williams Building.
    • Please be aware that Students found to have knowingly plagiarised or undertaken other forms of academic dishonesty will be dealt with by University procedures.

    Purchasing Protective Equipment, Medical Supplies & Stationary

    • The Adelaide University Union operates an on-campus shop for students at the Roseworthy Campus.
    • The shop will stock stationery items, basic grocery items, overalls, waterproof bib and brace overalls, lab coats, University merchandise and clothing as well as various medical supplies, e.g. Stethoscopes, veterinarian dissection kits, thermometers.
    • Binding and photocopying facilities are also available.
    • Monday to Thursday 10:00am – 4:00pm Ph. 08 8313 1450, email: tracey.granger@adelaide.edu.au

    Purchasing EMS Clothing

    • The Roseworthy on-campus shop provides Extra Mural Studies placement clothing and Animal Science clothing.
    • Orders can be placed twice a year, generally around the month of April and the month of October.

    Know who your Student Representatives are

    • The School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences has a number of committees that require student representatives.
    • Nominations and election of representatives will occur at the beginning of each academic year.

    Problems with Computers & Printing

    • For any issues involving the computer, its software systems or the printer (in the Computing Suite), contact Technology Service Desk on 8313 3000 (33000 from the phone in the computing suite).
    • The University has installed various wireless hubs across all campuses. For information on their locations and how to configure your laptop to the University system visit the technology services website.

    Resetting your passwords

    • Service Services staff in the College Hall (Main Building) will be able to assist students to reset passwords.
    • Password Security is important

    Find out about Scholarships and Prizes

    • There are a number of University Scholarships available to students
    • The School runs an annual Awards Evening to recognise the academic achievements of students. Please visit our Prizes page

    Complete Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT)

    • SELT surveys are designed to be an indicator of learning and teaching practices from the student perspective.
    • They are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design.
    • Students will be able to complete their surveys at the end of each semester online

    Complete Application for an allowed absence from a practical or tutorial class (if required)

    • Let the Course Co-ordinator know if you are going to be absent from a practical or tutorial as soon as possible. Fill out the Allowed Leave of Absence from Tutorial or Practical class form, take it with supporting documentation (e.g. medical certificate) to the Course Co-ordinator for approval. Once they sign it bring the form and supporting documentation to the Williams Building for processing.
  • Getting ready for Exam TimeStudent Checklist

    Check you exam times

    • The exams dates and when they will be available can be found on the Examinations website.

    Applying for Replacement Exam

    • If students cannot attend an exam due to illness or extenuating circumstances they can apply for a replacement exam. More informationcan be found on the Examinations website.

    Failed an exam?

There are a number of important Health and Safety information all students should be aware of and certain requirements that must be completed depending on the program students are enrolled.

  • SAVS Health and Safety

    The School is developing a Health and Safety MyUni website that is the main source of information for both staff and students when it comes to health and safety. Every staff member and SAVS student will have access to this course in the near future.

  • Inherent Requirements

    There are inherent requirements associated with the Bachelor of Science (Veterinary Bioscience) and the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine programs that students need to be aware of. These requirements include, but are not limited to, physical fitness, physical capacity to learn how to handle a range of large and small animals; required vaccinations (specifically Q fever); and effective written communication. Please read the Inherent Requirements information.

    The University will make reasonable adjustments to the requirements of the veterinary programs to cater for students with disabilities but without compromising the academic integrity of the programs or imposing unjustifiable hardship on the University.

  • Vaccinations and Zoonotic Diseases

    The School has developed Guidelines for Vaccinations which outlines the requirements around Q-Fever vaccinations and outlines a number of other important vaccinations. All student MUST read the Vaccination and Zoonotic Diseases Information.

    The School has developed guidelines for vaccinations. This document outlines the requirements around Q-Fever vaccinations and outlines a number of other important vaccinations.

    IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT Q-FEVER

    Bachelor of Science (Veterinary Bioscience) and Doctor of Veterinary Medicine students must be vaccinated against Q Fever (unless initial skin test indicates pre-existing immunity).

    Bachelor of Science (Animal Science) students are strongly advised to be vaccinated against Q Fever (unless initial skin test indicates pre-existing immunity).

    Honours, Masters and PhD students working in, visiting, or servicing areas housing the animals identified above (such as stockyards, abattoirs, shearing sheds) or areas where animal tissues, carcasses or waste products are handled or processed are strongly advised to be vaccinated (unless initial skin test indicates pre-existing immunity).

  • Clothing and Dress Standards

    For attendance at lectures or movement about the campus, the matter of dress is at your discretion, subject only to the dictates of good taste and common sense. Whilst bare feet may be tolerated within the confines of the Residential Halls, it is expected that some form of appropriate footwear will be worn whilst moving around the rest of the campus. This is essential whilst in and around the teaching, administration, research, farm and catering areas.

    The Williams, Callaghan & Veterinary Buildings are considered laboratory environments and footwear must be worn to enter the building (even if just for a lecture or to drop off an assignment).

    Clothing and dress standards are required, and enforced, for reasons of biosecurity (preventing transmission of disease between animals or from animals to people) and occupational health & safety. Additionally, we use these standards to promote a professional image and attitude among the students as well as for occasions when students are representing the School and the University to members of the general public.

  • Practical Session Code of Conduct

    All students must follow these rules in practical classes:

    • No eating, drinking, application of makeup, etc in laboratories; no water bottles or items of food or drink may be visible in laboratories.
    • Bags, coats, etc that are brought into a lab must be placed in or near the lockers or in the Bag Storage area to avoid causing obstructions.
    • CORRECT FOOTWEAR, CLOTHING AND OTHER PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT MUST BE WORN AT ALL TIMES. IF YOU DO NOT HAVE THE CORRECT GEAR, YOU WILL BE ASKED TO LEAVE AND YOU WILL NOT BE ABLE TO PARTICIPATE IN THE PRACTICAL.
      • Completely enclosed shoes like sneakers are considered the minimum standard of footwear in the lab.
      • During large animal or livestock handling practical sessions – ie sheep and horses – hard toe boots and overalls are the minimal standard required to participate in the session.
    • Lab coats are required to be worn for all lab session and must be removed when leaving the laboratory.
    • All containers used during a practical session must be labelled, including water and other common non‐toxic substances.
    • Report all accidents, both personal and/or involving experimental materials, to the person in charge IMMEDIATELY.
    • Playing around in a laboratory and many other work areas is dangerous; participants demonstrating inappropriate behaviour will be asked to leave.
    • Students must dispose of materials as directed (especially important for sharps and animal tissues).
    • Students must wash their hands upon departing the labs and other work areas.
    • STUDENTS MUST CLEAN AND TIDY THEIR BENCH AND/OR WORK AREA BEFORE DEPARTURE; benches and/or work areas will be inspected at the end of each practical session. Students not complying with the rules will be asked to leave the practical session in which the breach occurred.

    Practical classes: Closed-in footwear is essential for entry into practical classes. Sneakers are considered a minimum standard of footwear.

    Laboratory gowns will be provided for wearing in all laboratories (no matter the activity) and must be returned at the end of each class for laundering. You will not be allowed to participate in the class, or hand up any associated assessment, if you are not wearing the required clothing. In addition, for some classes, your student ID card must be on display (plastic holders will be provided) and attached to your laboratory gown. Any required safety or protective clothing for specific practical activities, e.g. safety glasses and gloves, will also be provided and must be worn as directed.

    Long hair should be tied back or covered.

    Livestock handling practicals: Any practical class or activity involving the handling of livestock (sheep, cattle, and horses) will require students to wear hard-toed boots and clean overalls. Failure to wear these items will mean that you are not able to participate in that practical class (or hand up any associated assessment). Long hair should be tied back or covered and jewellery removed. For activities involving clinical examination of animals, it is recommended that long nails be trimmed. It is also recommended that hats be worn for outdoor activities. If attending a practical at the Roseworthy piggery, you will be provided with overalls and boots for the session.

    Note that you are not allowed to wear overalls into any lecture theatres, tutorial rooms, Café spaces, Tavern, or offices on Campus – they are meant to be worn only for the appropriate practical activity.

    Prior to any livestock practical ALL STUDENTS AND STAFF must go to the Biosecurity Area [F35] and adhere to the following procedure:

    1. Carry overalls to the Biosecurity area. Overalls are NOT PERMITTED to be worn from the E40 Vet building or any building to a livestock area. Protective footwear can be worn if clean.
    2. At the Biosecurity area
      •  
        • change into clean overalls
        • Scrub boots with soapy water and then wash in F10 footbath
        • Wash hands with disinfectant
        • Proceed to the Horse barns
    3. At the Livestock area (after the practical)
      •  
        • Scrub boots with soapy water and then wash in F10 footbath
        • Wash hands with disinfectant
    4. Proceed back to the Biosecurity Area
      •  
        • Scrub boots with soapy water and then wash in F10 footbath
        • Wash hands with disinfectant
        • Remove overalls

    At home, we recommend that you launder your overalls separately from your normal laundry to prevent the spread of dirt and/or faecal material to your normal clothes.

    The School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences and the University of Adelaide are committed to providing students with a safe learning environment.

  • Known Medical Conditions

    If you have any known medical conditions, you are invited to make an appointment with the Student Support and Disability Advisor to discuss, in confidence, the potential impacts of your condition on your study program (veterinary students should also consult the Inherent Requirements of the program). Should you require reasonable adjustments in teaching or assessment, placements or work experience, you will need to register online with the Disability Service and make an appointment with the Student Support and Disability Advisor, Sally Polkinghorne.

    If you are unsure of the potential impact of your condition, please contact the Student Support and Disability Advisor for a confidential consultation.

    Reasonable Adjustments Reasonable adjustments could include:

    • Minor remedial measures such as wearing gloves, mask or other personal protective equipment;
    • Modifications to working practice (e.g. flexible arrangements regarding timing of placements/ practical classes);
    • Alternative Examination arrangements (e.g. extra reading time).

    In some circumstances, as a result of illness or injury, students may be unable to carry out clinical / laboratory duties or EMS placements as required for extended periods of time.

    In some situations there may be a request for further medical documents to assist with developing specific reasonable adjustments.

  • Student Safety on Extra Mural Studies (EMS) Placement

    It is the student’s responsibility to disclose any relevant health or medical information to their supervisor while on EMS placements. Examples could include allergies to certain food if the students is being housed on site and food is provided, pregnancy if working with large animals / radiation, relevant injuries etc.

  • Health Safety and Welfare

    All students must:

    1. Protect their own health and safety and avoid adversely affecting the health and safety of any other person.
    2. Report any incident or hazards at work to their manager/supervisor and the University.
    3. Obey any reasonable instruction aimed at protecting their health and safety while at work.
    4. Use any equipment provided to protect their health and safety while at work.
    5. Assist in the identification of hazards, the assessment of risks and the implementation of risk control measures.
    6. Carry out their roles and responsibilities as detailed in the health and safety policy and processes.
  • Hot Weather

    Students should be aware of hot weather conditions (whether they are on EMS placement, field trips or on campus) and take reasonable steps to ensure that they are protected and avoid dehydration.

    This includes:

    • Avoiding the heat:  If possible, avoid working in extreme heat.
    • Wearing a hat:  Take and wear a hat at all time when working outside.
    • Wearing appropriate clothes: Wear light coloured, loose-fitting clothes that cover all exposed skin.
    • Taking water:  Take a good supply of drinking water with you when working outside or in the heat.
    • Drinking water: Drink your water regularly when working outside or in the heat
    • Use Sunscreen:  Take and use a good supply of sunscreen when working outside.
    • SPEAKING UP:  tell your supervisor if you are feeling unwell.
    • SITTING DOWN IMMEDIATELY:  If feeling sick or faint, SIT DOWN IMMEDIATELY.  (This will attract attention, bring help and prevent you from falling down and hurting yourself).
  • Pregnancy

    For women who are pregnant, some risks are exacerbated. If a student is pregnant or possibly in the early stages of pregnancy it is the student’s responsibility to assess these associated risks in conjunction with advice from her health care professional. If a student is unsure of the potential impact of the pregnancy or require reasonable adjustments, please contact the Student Support and Disability Advisor for a confidential consultation.

  • Information Specific to the Veterinary programs

    Occupational Health & Safety for Veterinary Students

    A full list of Risk Assessments and Standard Operating Procedures for various aspects of working within the School of Animal & Veterinary Sciences is available.

    Included within this list are:

    • Standard Operating Procedures for Animal Handling
    • Risk Assessment for Equine Ambulatory Clinic
    • Risk Assessment for Production Ambulatory Clinic
    • Risk Assessment for Companion Health Centre
    • Risk Assessment for Necropsy Laboratories

    You will be directed to these as required during relevant courses.

    Standard Operating Procedures for Students in the Veterinary Health Centres (VHC)

    Brief description of work

    Students in the Bachelor of Science (Veterinary Bioscience) and DVM programmes have to undertake clinical work involving animals in the health centres, on ambulatory visits, on EMS and during final year rotations.

    Hazard identification

    • Allergies and other health issues
    • Biosecurity and zoonotic diseases
    • Personal injury
    • Anaesthetic gases, chemicals, reagents and drugs
    • Ionising radiation

    Control measures

      1. Allergies and other health issues
        Students need to be aware that clinical work involving animals requires a healthy body and mind. Students, who have known allergies to animals or other health issues that might compromise their safety, or affect their ability to undertake clinical work, must notify a member of staff prior to that work commencing. The possible consequences to such a notification might include:
        •  
          • Minor remedial measures such as the wearing of a mask, gloves or other personal protective equipment.
          • Modifications to a working practice (e.g. avoidance of lifting).
          • A recommendation to see a health professional.
          • A recommendation to see a University Student Support and Disability Advisor.

      1. Biosecurity and Zoonotic diseases
        Veterinary students must follow the biosecurity arrangements that are in place in each of the centres. Strict adherence to these principles is essential to prevent or reduce the spread of disease. Personal protective clothing (clinic coats, overalls, boots etc.) must be worn at all times when performing clinical work. In the CAHC, for example, hands must be washed after handling every animal.

        Veterinary surgeons and students may be exposed to animal diseases that can be transmitted to humans. Some of these are relatively minor (e.g. dermatophytosis). Some can be much more serious (e.g. Q fever, Psittacosis, Hendravirus). Veterinary students receive training in the appropriate biosecurity measures that need to be taken when dealing with species suspected of harbouring such diseases. Veterinary students must be vaccinated against Q fever because of their requirement to handle specific species.

      1. Personal injury
        Working with animals and in hospitals carries certain risks of injury that have to be identified and managed. These include:

        •  
          • Animal attacks or injuries – veterinary students receive extensive training in animal handling and restraint. 
          • Sharps injuries – veterinary students receive appropriate training on handling sharps (e.g. needles, scalpel blades). 
          • Manual handling injuries – veterinary students receive training on the appropriate methods to lift animals and other objects. 
          • Personal attacks
          • Fire - In the event of a fire, students should make their way immediately to the outside of the building.  Students should familiarize themselves with the various exits.  Students will be instructed where to go by other members of staff or a fire warden.  Instructions on what to do if there is a fire are posted around the hospital.

        Additional SOPs are available to cover each of these areas in the relevant sections of the VHCs. All injuries, however minor, must be reported to a supervisor and recorded in the incident book.

      1. Anaesthetic gases, chemicals, reagents and drugs
        Veterinary students are trained in the safe handling of anaesthetic gases, chemicals, reagents and drugs.  Additional SOPs are available to cover these areas.

    1. Ionising radiation
      Veterinary students receive extensive training in the safe handling of X-ray equipment.  See also the CAHC SOP on operation of X-ray equipment.
  • Code of Conduct

    Students are expected to participate in all activities associated with their courses. We understand that not all subject areas will be of direct interest to you, but we have designed the curriculum of our programs to ensure that you receive a broad and well-rounded training to maximise your career flexibility. Thus, you should attend and participate with equal vigour for all courses and classes.

    Students are expected to comply with the University Student Code of Conduct. Breaches of this code are taken seriously and may have future implications on ability to complete courses and/or programs. See Student Policy and Appeals for more information.

    Students aspiring to a veterinary career must keep in mind that the Veterinary Surgeons’ Board will ask applicants for registration: “Are you now or have you ever been the subject of an investigation by an …. educational institution ….. in respect of any matter that was or may be the subject of disciplinary proceedings”, and that the Board has the power to delay or to deny registration irrespective of any penalty that the University may have applied in a case of academic misconduct.
  • Social Media

    Students are also expected to comply with the University's guidelines regarding social media (i.e. Facebook, Twitter, etc). The rules don't change just because you are using social media: remember that the same standards apply online as in real life - including laws, University policies, behavioural expectations and the rules of common courtesy - and so do the same consequences for breaching them, including student or staff disciplinary processes in the University setting. The following principles provide some additional guidance specifically relevant to social media use:

    • Be respectful, genuine and credible.
    • Remember each social media platform is different. Make sure you understand the nuances and accepted communication style of each tool, before you jump in and start posting.
    • Remember social media spreads far and wide - please therefore post appropriately. If you wouldn't shout something out to a room full of 100 people, you shouldn't post it online either.
    • If you make a mistake, admit it and fix it quickly.
    • Maintain your online presence. Having outdated or unresponsive content on a social media page is arguably more compromising than having no presence at all.
    • Maintain confidentiality. Social media is inherently unsecure and far-reaching in its audience. Don't share any confidential, private or sensitive information through social media.
    • Protect your own safety and privacy. Consider your own privacy and safety before broadcasting real-time details about where you are or what you are doing. Make sure you fully understand the privacy settings you have for limiting who can see your information or posts.
    • Be aware of liability. You are responsible for you own posts, and they are almost impossible to erase. Be sure that what you post won't come back to haunt you later.
    • Think about how your posts might affect other people. If you write something negative or inflammatory about someone on a social media site, the whole community can see it - so it may have a much greater impact on others, even though you may not see that impact first hand. If you wouldn't say it to someone's face, don't post it online.
    • Think about what capacity you are acting in. If you are acting in an official University capacity, or as a person with a University connection, see the additional guidance below. If you are acting in your personal capacity, be sure to make that clear (especially where people might get confused as to whether or not you are speaking on behalf of the University).

    For more information visit the Social Media Etiquette & Obligations webpage.

  • Confidentiality

    Students, especially on placements or work experience, may be given access to a great deal of private or privileged information, including personal details of owners of animals. All information gained during these activities should be treated with respect and not discussed with friends, family or anyone else. Discussion with fellow students should only occur in an academic setting and be related to specific academic goals. If the personal/privileged information obtained is required for completion of an assessment task, you should ensure consent of the parties involved prior to inclusion; otherwise ensure you de-identify the material. Breaches of confidentiality by a student will be treated as academic misconduct.

  • Student Attendence

    Attendance at all practicals (and associated activities, such as field trips) and tutorials is compulsory for all courses. The curriculum of each course co-ordinated by the School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences has been designed with the assumption that students will attend all scheduled sessions. You should note that you will have considerable difficulty in achieving a satisfactory level in the formal assessment activities without a full commitment to attendance and participation in each course.

    In addition, many of the practical-based activities for courses at Roseworthy involve the use of animals. Preparation of materials is time-consuming and becomes expensive and wasteful when you do not turn up for class.
    Students are able to apply for an allowed absence from classes for medical, compassionate and personal reasons and should do so as soon as they know they will be absent.
    You must:

    1. Contact the Course Co-ordinator as soon as possible and let them know.
    2. Complete the Application for an Allowed Absence from Tutorial/Practical form (and take it and relevant supporting documentation) to the Course Co-ordinator for signing and approval
    3. Once signed take the completed paperwork to the Williams Building, Roseworthy Campus for processing.

    If approved, it is your responsibility to ensure you catch up on all information and any associated assessment activity. Although we understand the need for many students to work to be able to support themselves, you have committed to undertake University study. As such, repeated absences from classes due to work commitments will not be accepted.

    Students absent without permission will not be able to hand in any assessment item related to that activity.

    Students that are continuously absent from classes without permission may be precluded from sitting the final examination for that course and/or precluded from qualifying for an academic supplementary exam. Some courses may have specific repercussions for non-attendance – always consult your Course Outline.

    Students arriving late to class and activities can disrupt the class as well as miss out on important information relevant to the session. In some cases, the need to repeat information then delays the activity for the remainder of the class. Students arriving late to class may find that they are unable to enter until the lecturer/tutor/demonstrator has finished that section or may not be able to participate at all in the activity. If available, rear access to a teaching space should be used.

    Students are required to use the provided transport to and from field trips (Faculty of Science field trip policy). Students wishing to use their own transport must apply to the Head of School for permission prior to the field trip.

  • Mobile Phones

    Due to the nature of some of the activities undertaken in practical classes and on field trips and the fact that most phones have an inbuilt camera facility, students are not allowed to use mobile phones in these areas. Any student using a phone in these activities will be asked to leave immediately.

    If you are expecting an urgent or emergency call during a practical class, please ask them to ring the School Office on 8313 7987. A message will be passed to you as soon as possible.

    Please be considerate of your class-mates and turn your phone to silent during lectures.

  • Clothing and Dress Standards

    For attendance at lectures or movement about the campus, the matter of dress is at your discretion, subject only to the dictates of good taste and common sense.  Whilst bare feet may be tolerated within the confines of the Residential Halls, it is expected that some form of appropriate footwear will be worn whilst moving around the rest of the campus.  This is essential whilst in and around the teaching, administration, research, farm and catering areas.

    The Williams, Callaghan & Veterinary Buildings are considered laboratory environments and footwear must be worn to enter the building (even if just for a lecture or to drop off an assignment).

    Clothing and dress standards are required, and enforced, for reasons of biosecurity (preventing transmission of disease between animals or from animals to people) and occupational health & safety. Additionally, we use these standards to promote a professional image and attitude among the students as well as for occasions when students are representing the School and the University to members of the general public.

  • Information Specific to the Veterinary Programs

    By enrolling in the Veterinary program at the University of Adelaide, you are undertaking a PROFESSIONAL degree program that will, ultimately, allow you to graduate and be eligible for registration as a veterinarian. As such, there are various expectations regarding what elements you will be expected to cover, not all of which you may think is relevant or required at the time. However, the Veterinary program has been designed as a six year program, where base elements are built upon across the years. As such, you should treat the courses within both the Bachelor of Science (Veterinary Bioscience) and Doctor of Veterinary Medicine programs as a continuous stretch across the six years, rather than a series of short courses to be passed and forgotten.

School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
Address

School of Animal & Veterinary Sciences
THE UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE
SA 5005 AUSTRALIA

General Enquiries

T: +61 8 8313 7987
avs_enquiries@adelaide.edu.au

Admissions Enquiries

T: +61 8 8313 7660
animalvetsci@adelaide.edu.au