MANAGEMT 7087NA - Managing Contemporary Organisations

Ngee Ann Academy - Quadmester 4 - 2019

This course exposes students to some key influences and perspectives on the management of organisations. Its focus is primarily on human issues that affect and are dealt with by managers day-to-day. The course is an extension of "Fundamentals of Leadership" and provides the background and theoretical framework for more advanced studies in business management. Some of the topics addressed may, at first, seem somewhat theoretical or even 'philosophical' in nature, but the whole course is designed to provide students with the foundation for practical action in the field. The ability to analyse and to think clearly and independently about these issues will be the basis of effective action. Managing Contemporary Organisations begins by examining the nature of 'organisation' as an 'open system'. We then look at the management challenge in relation to various facets of organisation - learning, motivation, politics, performance, ethics, culture, innovation, decision-making, structure and change. Throughout the course there is an emphasis on thinking about and asking important questions, rather than fixing on 'right' answers.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code MANAGEMT 7087NA
    Course Managing Contemporary Organisations
    Coordinating Unit Business School
    Term Quadmester 4
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s Ngee Ann Academy
    Units 3
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Course Description This course exposes students to some key influences and perspectives on the management of organisations. Its focus is primarily on human issues that affect and are dealt with by managers day-to-day. The course is an extension of "Fundamentals of Leadership" and provides the background and theoretical framework for more advanced studies in business management. Some of the topics addressed may, at first, seem somewhat theoretical or even 'philosophical' in nature, but the whole course is designed to provide students with the foundation for practical action in the field. The ability to analyse and to think clearly and independently about these issues will be the basis of effective action.
    Managing Contemporary Organisations begins by examining the nature of 'organisation' as an 'open system'. We then look at the management challenge in relation to various facets of organisation - learning, motivation, politics, performance, ethics, culture, innovation, decision-making, structure and change.
    Throughout the course there is an emphasis on thinking about and asking important questions, rather than fixing on 'right' answers.
    Course Staff
    Dr. Chris Smith
    Email: dr.chris.smith@adelaide.edu.au
    Website: www.myuni.adelaide.edu.au  

    Chris started his working life as a clinical psychologist in the psychiatric unit of a general hospital. After several years he moved into the business sector and, via a corporate HR role, occupied a number of general management/CEO positions across a variety of industries in Australia and the UK. In the mid-90s he left the business world for the academic one and joined Warwick Business School (UK) where he is currently an Associate Fellow of the Marketing and Strategic Management Group. In 2002 he moved to South Australia and became a full-time faculty member of the University of Adelaide Business School. He teaches on MBA and executive education programmes across a variety of international settings.
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of the course, students will be able to:
    1. Work within major theories and perspectives on the management of organisations to identify and address key questions  concerning effective management within their own organisations.
    2. Identify the relationships between individual experiences and organisational behaviours from a  systems view of organisational dynamics
    3. Explain the implications of a systems perspective for the role and challenges of managing people in organisations



    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1,2,3
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1,2,3
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    1
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    1,2,3
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    2,3
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    1,2,3
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    The text for this course is
    • Buchanan, D. and Huczynski, A. A. (2017) Organizational Behavior 9th Ed. Prentice-Hall/Pearson Education. 
    Online Learning
    No specific online learning facilities are part of the course other than the usual communication and sharing of information/papers via MyUni.
    Please ensure that your MyUni email address is one through which you can be contacted. 
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Session 1: Causal analysis and managerial judgement
    In this session we will unpack the concept of judgment and in particular how the results of any analysis will be the groundwork for all decisions that a manager makes. Note that any action is based on implicit or explicit analysis of causes. If the analysis is wrong it is highly probable that the decision will also be wrong.

    Chapters 1-4 Huczynski and Buchanan
    In praise of laziness. Businesspeople would be better off if they did less and thought more The Economist. (17 Aug. 2013)
    Kim, D. H. (1992) Guidelines for drawing causal loop diagrams. The Systems Thinker, 3(1):5-6.
    Repenning, N. P. & Sterman, J .D. (2001). Nobody ever gets credit for fixing problems that never happened. California Management Review 43(4):64-88

     Session 2: The individual
    There are a variety of individual attributes and processes such as intelligence, personality, perception, attitudes and thinking that influence our behaviour, the decisions we make, our views of the other people, our perspectives on why other people behave as they do compared with ourselves, etc. Physical and social ‘genetics’ give us habitual ways of responding in particular situations. 

    Chapters 5- 8 Huczynski and Buchanan
    Cognitive biases. Wikipedia, 2017
    Dunning, D. (2013) The paradox of knowing, The Psychologist 26(6):414-417.
    In praise of misfits. Why business needs people with Asperger’s syndrome, attention-deficit disorder and dyslexia, The Economist (2 June 2012)
    Lovallo, D and Sibony O. (2010) The case for behavioural strategy. The McKinsey Quarterly March: 1-10.
    Myths about millennials. Businesses should beware of dubious generalizations about younger workers. The Economist (1 Aug. 2015)
    To err is human; so if the failure to admit it. The Economist (1 June 2017)
     
    Session 3: Motivation
    Why do people do some things and not others? Why do some people work until midnight each day while others get off work as soon as they can? Why? One of the key requirements of effective management is that the manager’s subordinates continue to work efficiently and effectively, and even to improve their efficiency and effectiveness when their manager is not present.

    Chapter 9 Buchanan and Huczynski
    Dewhurst, M., Guthridge, M. and Mohr, E. (2009) Motivating People – getting beyond money McKinsey Quarterly (November): 1-5.
    Digital Taylorism: A modern versions of “scientific management” threatens to dehumanize the workplace. The Economist (12 Sep 2015)
    How to thrive at work with the minimum of effort, The Economist October, 2014
    Ordonez, L., Schweltzer, E., Galinsky, A. & Bazerman, A. (2009) Goals gone wild: the systematic effects of over-prescribing goal setting, Academy of Management Practice, (Feb.): 6-16.
    Pulakos, E.E & O’Leary, R.S. (2011). Why is performance management broken? Industrial and Organizational Psychology, 4: 146-164.
    Ryan, R. M and Deci, E. L, (2000) Self-Determination Theory and the Facilitation of Intrinsic Motivation, Social Development and Well-Being. American Psychologist 55(1), 68-68.
    Thibaut, J. & Kelley, H. (1959) Social Exchange Theory.
    The other side of paradise The Economist (Jan. 2016)
    Why bosses should be careful with performance related pay, TheEconomist, (May 2013)
     
    Session 4: Groups, roles and norms
    In this session examine the structure and development of groups. The norms of the group and the roles we chose or are chosen to play demand particular behaviours and attitudes from us. For most of us the choice between being part of the group and being excluded by it is taken in the direction of group membership. 

    Chapter 10-13, Buchanan and Huczynski
    Bryan, L.L., Matson, E. & Weiss, L.M. (2007) Harnessing the power of informal employee networks, McKinsey Quarterly (4): 1-10.
    Facebook is bad for you; Get a life! Using the social network seems to make people more miserable. The Economist, (17 Aug. 2013)
    Team spirit. The Economist (19 Mar. 2016)
    The collaboration curse. The Economist (23 Jan. 2016)
    The making of Bonecrusher, Esquire, 1999
    Quattrociocchi, W. (2017) Conspiracy Theories. Scientific American, April, 52-52
     
    Session 5: Social influence processes
    Being with others has a major impact on how people behave and think as we (unknowingly at times) conform to group pressure and norms. Similarly we are always influenced by the rules and policies of the organization we are in and in particular by the commands of our bosses and of ‘the system’. 

    Chapter 10-13, Buchanan and Huczynski
    In the social-media age, bosses careers are more vulnerable than ever, The Economist, 2014 (11 October)
    New research hints at ways to make meetings more effective. The Economist (4th Apr. 2015)
    Robertson, I. (2013) How power affects the brain. The Psychologist, 26(3): 186-9.
    Power corrupts, but it corrupts only those who think they deserve it. The Economist (21 Jan 2010).

    Session 6: Organizational structure and context
    It is often suggested, “structure follows strategy” in that organizations are theoretically designed and structured in the best way to deliver the planned strategy. From bureaucracies to the N-form there are intended and unintended consequences of structure. The challenge of developing the “best” structure is even greater in this era of globalization and the Internet. 

    Chapter 14-17, Buchanan and Huczynski
    Alvesson, M. & Spicer, A. S. (2012) A Stupidity-Based Theory of Organizations. Journal of Management Studies, 49(7): 1194-1220.
    Agrawal, V., J. M. Manyika and J.E. Richards. (2003) Matching people and jobs. McKinsey Quarterly Special Edition. 70-8.
    Braithwaite, J., Westbrook, J. & Iedema, R (2005) Restructuring as gratification. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine,98:542-44
    Ghislanzoni et al (2010), Taking organizational redesign from plan to practice. McKinsey Quarterly 1-9

    Session 7: Conflict and conflict management
    Conflict at the interpersonal, intergroup and inter-organizational level is an inevitable part of organizational life. Whether the conflict between tasks spills over into destructive conflict between people and how this is managed is an integral part of the manager’s day-to-day life.

    Chapter 21 Buchanan and Huczynski
    A matter of trust Behaviour such as reciprocity and co-operation is not bred in the bone. Rather, it responds to incentives and experience The Economist (15 Feb 2001)
    Tjosvold, D. (2008) The conflict-positive organization: it depends upon us. Journal of Organizational Behavior. 29: 19-28
    Weiss, J. & Hughes, J (2005) Want collaboration? Accept and positively manage conflict, Harvard Business Review, March: 93-101.

    Session 8: Forecasting and decision-making
    Managers continuously make decisions individually and in groups; in fact the most important decisions in organizations, e.g. capital expenditure, brand campaigns, product development, whether to launch or not launch a space shuttle, etc. are always taken by groups. Unfortunately the most important decisions are often the ones that are the most uncertain both with respect to required expertise, the processes of deciding and the ranking of outcomes.

    Chapter 20, Buchanan and Huczynski
    How companies make good decisions. McKinsey Quarterly Dec. 2008: 1-7
    In search of clarity. Unravelling the complexities of executive decision-making. The Economist Intelligence Unit Sept. 2007
    Lovallo, D. P and Sibony, O. (2006) Distortions and deceptions in strategic decisions. The hidden traps in decision making. McKinsey Quarterly (1), September-October, 19-29.
    Wiesel, F., Modell, S. & Moll, J. (2011). Customer orientation and management control in the public sector: A garbage can analysis. European Account8ing Review 20(3): 551-581
     
    Session 9: Organizational change
    There comes the time when managers may decide that change must take place. This is a difficult process that may make things worse and many managers prefer the less risky option of ‘going with the flow’. However there are some broad guidelines and evidentiary-based orientations that can make success more likely.

    Chapter 19 Buchanan and Huczynski
    Appelbaum, SH, Habashy S., Malo, J.L & Shafiq H (2012) Back to the future: revisiting Kotter’s 1996 change model, Journal of Management Development Vol. 31 No. 8, 2012, 765-782
    Beinhocker, E. D. (2006) The adaptable corporation, McKinsey Quarterly, 2: 77-87.
    Boaz, N. and Fox, E. A. (2014) Change leader, change thyself. McKinsey Quarterly March 1-11.
    Hughes, M. (2012) Do 70 per cent of all organizational change initiatives really fail? Journal of Change Management, 11(4):451-464.
    Inflexible organization destroys strategy The Economist, (6 Sept 2014)
    Isern, J. & Pung, C (2007) Driving radical change.McKinsey Quarterly, 4: 1-12.
    Swanson, D. J & Cree, A. S. (2014) sharpening the focus of Force Field Analysis. Journal of Change Management 14(1):28-47
     
    Session 10: Management and Leadership
    In the good times the business press praises top business people as charismatic, decisive, and transformational and in the bad times (i.e. now!) as greedy, incompetent and overpaid. And each year there are new books in the airport bookstalls giving advice on how to be a great leader and/or manager. In this session we examine leadership and management and try and discover some of the simpler ‘truth’.

    Chapter 18 Buchanan and Huczynski 
    Barsch, J., Mogelof, J and Webb, C. (2010) How centred leadership achieves extraordinary results.  McKinsey Quarterly, 1-9.
    Going off the rails Companies need to keep an eye on their bosses for signs of destructive behaviour.  The Economist (30 Nov. 2013)
    Measuring management. It is no longer just a plausible theory that good management boosts  productivity The Economist, (18 Jan, 2014)
    Royal Bank of Scotland: What a disaster. Lessons from the collapse The Economist, (26 Oct. 2013)
    Sutton, B. (2010) Good bosses tune in. McKinsey Quarterly, (August): 2-10.
    The look of a leader. The Economist (27 Sept 2014) X
    Workload

    No information currently available.

    Learning Activities Summary

    No information currently available.

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Item Percentage of total mark Relevant Learning Outcome Due or Scheduled Date
    Individual Assignment 1 60% A,B,C,D 17th November 2017
    Group Projects 30% A,B,C,D 19 November 2017
    Class Participation 10% A,B,C In Class
    Assessment Detail
    GROUP ASSIGNMENT (30%)

    The interaction of individual and group dynamics makes each organization in a country unique in many way and yet similar in others. Using concepts from the first intensive and the organizations represented in your groups prepare a PowerPoint presentation that shows the differences and similarities and explain these (again using concepts from the first intensive). Use the ‘notes’ pages of the presentation to make your more detailed points. The presentation should comprise 10-15 slides with 150-200 words on the notes pages as the major content). Note that you will not be required to make a presentation.

    INDIVIDUAL ASSIGNMENT (60%)

    Using models and theories from the organizational behaviour literature critically analyse the processes/outcomes/etc. of one of
    a) Conflict, conflict resolution;
    b) Decision-making or
    c) Management/leadership in your organization.
    There will probably be overlap between these three but ensure that your theoretical and practical focus is on one area. Suggest how any problems you identify might be resolved in the short, medium and long term.

    – NB writing a concept in normal language is generally ‘description’ and not analysis. Analysis is the key to passing this assignment – description only is a key to failing it.

    The analysis should be 2000-3000 words and should be correctly referenced to specific articles or parts of the textbook (do not reference ‘slides handouts’)

    Note: the purpose of this exercise is for you to demonstrate the analytic use of models from the course and others we have not covered

    ENGAGEMENT (10%)

    This will reflect your participation in the class, your resistance to ‘phone obsession’ etc. and in general your conduct as an active learner.
    Submission
    The individual assignment, with the appropriate coversheet and declaration is to be submitted via MyUni. . Please submit your assignment in ‘Word’ format and not pdf.

    Students are expected to submit their work by the due date to maintain a fair and equitable system. Extensions will generally only be given for medical or other serious reasons. All requests for extensions must be emailed to the lecturer in charge of the course before the due date. Each request will be assessed on its merits. A late assignment (without prior arrangement) may be penalised by a 5% mark reduction for each day that it is late.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

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    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

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  • Policies & Guidelines
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