ANAT SC 3108 - Applied Anatomy of Cranial Nerves by Dissection

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2017

The Applied Anatomy of the Cranial Nerves by Dissection course aims to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the structure and function of cranial nerves. It involves the study of the deep cranial nerve nuclei, intracerebral course of the nerves, superficial attachments to the brain surface, intracranial course, relations to the dura and foramina of the skull, extracranial course, distribution to structures in the head and neck, function of each nerve, the basis of clinical examination of various nerves and interpretation of deficits. The principal mode of learning is by dissection of the human body supported by a weekly overview lecture.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code ANAT SC 3108
    Course Applied Anatomy of Cranial Nerves by Dissection
    Coordinating Unit Medical Sciences
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 4 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange N
    Prerequisites Level I MBBS
    Corequisites Level II MBBS core course
    Restrictions Available to Level II MBBS students only
    Course Description The Applied Anatomy of the Cranial Nerves by Dissection course aims to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the structure and function of cranial nerves. It involves the study of the deep cranial nerve nuclei, intracerebral course of the nerves, superficial attachments to the brain surface, intracranial course, relations to the dura and foramina of the skull, extracranial course, distribution to structures in the head and neck, function of each nerve, the basis of clinical examination of various nerves and interpretation of deficits. The principal mode of learning is by dissection of the human body supported by a weekly overview lecture.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Associate Professor Ian Johnson

    Tutor: Associate Professor Mounir Ghabriel
    Phone: +61 8 8313 5481
    Email: mounir.ghabriel@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: North Terrace, School of Medical Sciences

    Tutor: Professor Douglas Coster
    Phone: +61 8 8313 5481
    Email: douglas.coster@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: School of Medical Sciences

    Tutor: Professor Brian Brophy
    Phone: +61 8 8313 5481
    Email: brian.brophy@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: School of Medical Sciences

    Tutor: Dr Amir Ghaly
    Phone: +61 8 8313 5481
    Email: amir.ghaly@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: School of Medical Sciences

    Tutor: Dr Levon Gabrielian
    Phone: +61 8 8313 5481
    Email: levon.gabrielian@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: School of Medical Sciences

    School Office
    Phone: +61 8 8313 5571
    Email: ryan.rosner@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: North Terrace Campus
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 To acquire written and verbal abilities to use anatomical terminology in describing the structure and function of the cranial nerves to peers and faculty
    2 To explain the relationships between structure and functions of the cranial nerves
    3 To demonstrate an ability to identify and locate cranial nerves and related anatomical structures in a practical setting
    4 To demonstrate an ability to compare dissections of other cadavers and acquire knowledge of anatomical variations
    5 To demonstrate the ability to interpret the relationship of cranial nerves in dissections, images and MRI scans
    6 To evaluate and explain the anatomical basis of functional deficits
    7 To develop clinical reasoning and problem-solving skills in clinical scenarios related to Cranial nerves dysfunction
    8 To develop the ability to acquire, read, interpret and synthesise information from a wide variety of relevant sources, including online and e-books in a planned and timely manner
    9 To demonstrate a professional attitude in dissection classes, treat the dissected bodies with respect and dignity, and to understand the ethical issues and privileges of being able to dissect human cadavers for acquisition of knowledge
    10 To demonstrate appropriate teamwork in shared dissection tasks and time management
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1,2,6,7
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    5,6,7,8
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    1,10
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    9,10
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    9
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, diffuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    9,10
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Dissection Kit is personal and should be acquired by students. Containing basic item such as large and small pointed pairs of scissors, toothed and non-toothed forceps, pointer/probe, good quality scalpel handle # 4 and blades #22 or 23 (or scalpel handle number 3 and blades # 10 or 15), and an artery forceps (haemostat). The Department will provide other specialised tools for dissections.
    Recommended Resources

    Neuroanatomy textbook: one of the following

    1- Blumenfeld Hal (2010) Neuroanatomy Through Clinical Cases. Sinauer Associates, Inc, Sunderland, Massachusetts. Particularly Ch. 5, 12, 13 and 14.

    2- Martin J H (2012) Neuroanatomy Text and Atlas, Ch. 11, 4th edition, McGraw Hill

    3- FitzGerald MJT, Gruener G and Mtui E (2007) Clinical neuroanatomy and neuroscience, Saunders

    4- Young PA et al (2008) Basic Clinical Neuroscience, 2nd ed., Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia, particularly Chapters 3, 12, 13, 14, 21, 23

    5- Kiernan AJ (2009) Barr's: The Human Nervous System, An Anatomical Viewpoint, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Philadelphia, particularly chapters 6, 7, 8, 26

     

    Neuroanatomy textbook synopsis

    1- Monkhouse S (2005) Cranial Nerves: Functional Anatomy, Cambridge University Press,

     

    Gross anatomy textbook: one of the following:

    1- Moore K H et al., Clinically Oriented Anatomy, 6th ed., 2010, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Philadelphia.

    2- Drake, RL, Vogel W and Mitchell A W M, Gray’s Anatomy for Students, 2005, Elsevier Churchill Livingstone, Philadelphia.

     

    Reference Book:

    Scott-Conner, C. & Dawson, D.L. (2009). Operative anatomy. Sydney: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. The library has acquired some copies and one is kept in the reserved section.

     

    Anatomy atlas: one of the following:

    1- Abrahams P, Boon JM and Spratt J (2008) McMinn’s Clinical Atlas of Human Anatomy, Sixth ed., Mosby

    2- Moses KP, Banks JC, Nava PB Petersen D (2005) Atlas of Clinical Gross Anatomy, Elsevier Mosby,

    3- Agur AMR & Lee MJ (2009) Grant's Atlas of Anatomy, 11th Ed. Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Philadelphia.

    4- Clemente CD (2011) Anatomy a Regional Atlas of the Human Body, 6th ed., Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

     

    Dissection Manual

    Tank P W (2013) Grant’s Dissector, 15th edition, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Philadelphia

    Online Learning
    The primary communication channel is via MyUni and University e-mail. Check MyUni regularly before each class. All documentation including past exam papers, weekly dissection tasks and lecture notes will be placed on MyUni: https://myuni.adelaide.edu.au/webapps/login

    Not reading one's University-provided e-mail or MyUni announcements will not be a valid reason for missing important deadlines etc.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Lectures are supported by dissection program and formative assessments tasks/questions related to the week's activities. Practical dissection classes are hands-on experience of discovery and it is expected that everyone will contribute. Lectures are related to the weekly dissection learning class.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    As a 3-unit course, Applied Anatomy of the Cranial Nerves will require approximately 12 hours of work per week, including lecture and practical dissections attendance.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Week Topic Lecture
    Week 1 Dissection: Introduction and allocation of groups, safety rules, Dissection methods, Dissection of superficial branches of the cranial nerves in the face and scalp Introduction, skull, superficial structures of the face
    Week 2 Dissection: Continue the dissection of superficial branches of the cranial nerves in the face and scalp Facial muscles, nerves and vessels of the face
    Week 3 Dissection: Parotid region Partoid region
    Week 4 Dissection: Temporal region, mandibular division of V, muscles of mastication, TMJ Temporal region, mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve
    Week 5 Dissection: Interior of the skull, meninges and removal of the brain Cranial cavity 1
    Week 6 Dissection: Continue interior of the skull, meninges and removal of the brain Cranial cavity 2
    Week 7 Dissection: Orbit and related cranial nerves Orbit 1
    Week 8 Dissection: Orbit and related cranial nerves Orbit 2
    Week 9 Dissection: Mid-Semester Spotter Test Cavernous sinus and revision
    Week 10 Dissection: Dissection of the oral region Cranial nerves: facial and glossopharyngeal
    Week 11 Dissection: Revision of practical dissections Cranial nerves: hypoglossal and lingual. Maxillary division V.
    Week 12 Dissection: Revision of practical dissections Overview
    Week 13 No teaching No teaching
    Specific Course Requirements
    Attendance in lectures and dissections is compulsory to pass the course. In order to pass Applied Anatomy of the cranial Nerves, students are required to achieve a grade of at least 50% for the course. If you are unable to attend any of the lectures or practical classes you are required to provide a valid reason.

    Policy on return of examination papers
    The Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology does not return examination papers to students. However, students who fail the examination may have an opportunity to review their paper with a member of the academic staff at the beginning of the following semester.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Although this is a year 2 course it includes by nature of dissection a discovery experience. Students work in small groups of 4 in the dissection tasks, and by comparing their caver findings to the findings of other groups, they acquire knowledge of anatomical variations. Each cadaver is unique in the finer anatomical structures, the effects of live style, profession, ageing, and previous surgical and medical history.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Assessment Type Weighting Learning Outcome(s) being addressed
    Clinical Scenarios, study images, scans, Questions are included in the hand outs of each practical dissection class Formative 0% 1-8
    Written examination Summative 50% 1-8
    Practical spotter examination Summative 20% 1-8
    Practical spotter test Summative 20% 1-8
    In-course assessment Summative 10% 1-8
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Attendance in lectures and dissections is compulsory to pass the course. In order to pass AACNs, students are required to achieve a grade of at least 50% for the course. If you are unable to attend any of the lectures or practical classes you are required to provided a valid reason.
    Assessment Detail
    Assessment comprises several parts:

    Formative assessments

    Formative assessments e-Learning will be provided weekly online in the form of clinical scenarios, quizzes, images, diagrams etc. All students should attempt the formative assessment, time will be allocated in lectures for questions/answers.


    Summative assessments

    All tests and exams will be conducted by full-time academic staff


    Assessment 1--Written Examination (individual assessment)

    Supervised

    Weighting: 50%

    Type/duration: Theory paper, a mix of clinical scenarios, short answers and MCQs, 2 hours.

    Date: Exam period end of semester 2


    Assessment 2— Practical examination (individual assessment)

    Weighting 20%

    Type/duration Practical Anatomy spotter exam – 30 min

    Date: Examination period end of semester 2


    Assessment 3—Practical test Mid-semester (individual assessment)

    Supervised

    Weighting 20%

    Type/duration Practical anatomy spotter test – 30 min

    Date: first week after mid-semester break


    Assessment 4— continuous assessment during the practical classes to determine knowledge of the current topic, preparation for the task, participation in the dissection, engagement and attendance (individual 
    assessment), and the ability to work as a team (team assessment),

    Supervised

    Weighting 10%

    Submission

    No information currently available.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

    Supplementary Examinations

    On Medical or Compassionate Grounds
    To request a supplementary examination on Medical or Compassionate grounds, appropriate forms should be obtained from the appropriate web site, completed and submitted in the appropriate time frame. Students are advised to refer to the university’s website and policy on supplementary examinations. The academic staff will make the final decision regarding the offer of a supplementary examination. Sitting a supplementary examination offered on this basis will result in a formal mark being awarded, i.e. pass, credit or distinction.

    On Academic Grounds
    Students cannot request a supplementary examination on academic grounds. Supplementary examinations will be offered to students on academic grounds (normally a final grade of between 45% and 49%). Those sitting supplementary examinations on academic grounds will be required to achieve a grade of at least 50% in the supplementary examination to pass the course. Successful completion of supplementary examinations offered on this basis can only result in a final mark for the course of 50%.

    Supplementary examinations are only held during the official university supplementary examination period and students are expected to be available to sit supplementary examinations at this time. Students who are offered a supplementary examination, but who fail to sit on the set date and time will be deemed to have failed AACNs. Pre-booked vacation, overseas travel or family celebrations are unacceptable reasons to be unavailable for the supplementary examination. Those who cannot sit the supplementary examination on the basis of extraordinary medical or compassionate grounds may be offered the opportunity to sit another examination at the time of the next available examination of AACNs (usually Semester II of the following year). A withheld result will be entered on the student academic record until such examination is sat. Failure to sit the next available exam will result in a grade of fail being awarded.
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    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

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