SPAN 2112 - Introduction to the Culture of Spain

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2022

This course is a general introduction to the conformation of the Spanish culture from the time of the Roman invasion onwards. It is aimed at students with little or no knowledge of the Iberian Peninsula. The main periods in Spanish cultural history to be emphasised are: Muslim Spain (708-1492); the reigns of the Catholic Kings and Carlos V; the Spanish Golden Age; 19th Century Spanish society and culture; the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939); and democratic Spain (from 1975 onwards). Spanish culture will be studied and discussed from a variety of topics and perspectives, the most relevant being race relations, the role of the Catholic Church in the shaping of Spanish society and culture, militarism, literature as reflection of social reality, nationalism, and contemporary cinema. Lectures for this course will be conducted in English and tutorials in Spanish. Reading and screening material will be mostly in Spanish.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code SPAN 2112
    Course Introduction to the Culture of Spain
    Coordinating Unit Spanish Studies
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites SPAN 2101
    Assumed Knowledge Intermediate level oral & written knowledge of the Spanish language
    Course Description This course is a general introduction to the conformation of the Spanish culture from the time of the Roman invasion onwards. It is aimed at students with little or no knowledge of the Iberian Peninsula. The main periods in Spanish cultural history to be emphasised are: Muslim Spain (708-1492); the reigns of the Catholic Kings and Carlos V; the Spanish Golden Age; 19th Century Spanish society and culture; the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939); and democratic Spain (from 1975 onwards). Spanish culture will be studied and discussed from a variety of topics and perspectives, the most relevant being race relations, the role of the Catholic Church in the shaping of Spanish society and culture, militarism, literature as reflection of social reality, nationalism, and contemporary cinema.

    Lectures for this course will be conducted in English and tutorials in Spanish. Reading and screening material will be mostly in Spanish.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Jorge Paredes

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    1. Acquire an advanced level of knowledge and understanding of the historical development of Spanish culture.
    2. Heighten their awareness and understanding of different ways of seeing the world, with an emphasis on the Hispanic world view.
    3. Further their understanding of and respect for global cultural difference and diversity combined with a knowledge and understanding of the issues involved in intercultural communication.
    4. Advance their ability to communicate effectively with their peers in Spanish and to discuss issues related to Spanish culture and history.
    5. Identify the most important events and historical characters in the development of Spanish culture.
    6. Write essays of 1500 words or more in Spanish on specific topics that pertain to the Spanish people and their culture, following academic conventions.
    7. To prepare and deliver oral presentations on Spanish culture, making use of appropriate technologies.
    8. Further develop their critical and analytical thinking skills.
    9. To discern the main cultural differences between the cultures of Australia and the Spanish-speaking world, and to ascertain the positive confluences between the two views of the world in a respectful way.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)

    Attribute 1: Deep discipline knowledge and intellectual breadth

    Graduates have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of their subject area, the ability to engage with different traditions of thought, and the ability to apply their knowledge in practice including in multi-disciplinary or multi-professional contexts.

    1 2, 3 4,5

    Attribute 2: Creative and critical thinking, and problem solving

    Graduates are effective problems-solvers, able to apply critical, creative and evidence-based thinking to conceive innovative responses to future challenges.

    4, 5, 6, 7, 8. 9

    Attribute 3: Teamwork and communication skills

    Graduates convey ideas and information effectively to a range of audiences for a variety of purposes and contribute in a positive and collaborative manner to achieving common goals.

    2, 4, 6, 7

    Attribute 4: Professionalism and leadership readiness

    Graduates engage in professional behaviour and have the potential to be entrepreneurial and take leadership roles in their chosen occupations or careers and communities.

    2, 5, 9

    Attribute 5: Intercultural and ethical competency

    Graduates are responsible and effective global citizens whose personal values and practices are consistent with their roles as responsible members of society.

    2, 3, 9

    Attribute 6: Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural competency

    Graduates have an understanding of, and respect for, Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander values, culture and knowledge.

    N/A

    Attribute 7: Digital capabilities

    Graduates are well prepared for living, learning and working in a digital society.

    7

    Attribute 8: Self-awareness and emotional intelligence

    Graduates are self-aware and reflective; they are flexible and resilient and have the capacity to accept and give constructive feedback; they act with integrity and take responsibility for their actions.

    2, 3, 9
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Historia, cultura y civilización de España. Course reader.
    Online Learning
    Lectures for this course are pre-recorded and will be available for students to complete on a weekly basis. STudents must complete the lectures in their own time, but always before the tutorial meeting.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    No information currently available.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    WORKLOAD TOTAL HOURS

    WORKLOAD TOTAL HOURS
    2 x 1-hour lectures per week .................................... 24 hours per semester
    1 x 1-hour tutorial per week ..................................... 12 hours per semester
    6 hours reading per week ......................................... 72 hours per semester
    2 hours research per week ....................................... 24 hours per semester
    2 hours assignment preparation per week ............... 24 hours per semester
                                                                       TOTAL = 156 hours per semester
    Learning Activities Summary
    Week 1: 26 de julio

    Lecture:
    - Introducción al curso.
    - La España actual. ¿Con qué asociamos a España? ¿Qué es la
    “españolidad”? ¿Cuáles son los principales prototipos sobre los
    españoles?
    - Los primeros pobladores:
    Tartesos estaba al fin del mundo.
    Fenicios, griegos y cartagineses.

    Tutoría: No hay tutorías la primera semana.


    Week 2: 2 de agosto

    Lecture:

    - Hispania: la Península Ibérica bajo dominio romano.
    - La Península visigótica (contribuciones culturales de los
    Visigodos.

    Tutoría: Rebelión de Viriato contra los romanos.


    Week 3: 9 de agosto

    Lecture:

    La España islámica

    Tutoría: La mujer en la España musulmana.


    Week 4: 16 de agosto

    Lecture:

    - Presentación oral número 1: El legado cultural árabe en España
    - Presentación oral número 2: La Reconquista

    - La conquista cristiana.
    - De los Reyes Católicos a Carlos I.

    Tutoría: El descubrimiento de América.


    Week 5: 23 de agosto

    Lecture:

    - Presentación oral número 3: Juana “la loca”
    - Presentación oral número 4: Felipe II.
    - El Gran Imperio Español: Felipe II.
    - El deterioro del Imperio Español: causas y procesos.

    Tutoría: Don Carlos y Felipe II


    Week 6: 30 de agosto

    Lecture:

    - Presentación oral número 5: El Siglo de Oro español.
    - Presentación oral número 6: Don Quijote de La Mancha.
    - Siglo XVIII y principio del XIX: la dinastía de los Borbones.

    Tutoría: La leyenda negra.


    Week 7: 6 de septiembre

    Lecture:

    - Presentación oral número 7: Francisco de Goya.
    - Presentación oral número 8: La invasión francesa y la Guerra de Independencia.

    - La pérdida de las colonias americanas.
    - Fernando VII, “el esperado” e Isabel II.

    Tutoría: La Revolución Gloriosa (1868)

    Essay number 1 due Friday 8 September. (To be submitted by
    4:00 PM via MyUni)


    Week 8: 13 de septiembre

    Lecture:
    - Presentación oral número 9: Federico García Lorca y su obra
    - Presentación oral número 10: El reinado de Alfonso XIII

    - La Segunda República

    Tutoría: La dictadura de Primo de Rivera


    18 al 29 de septiembre: Mid-semester break


    Week 9: 4 de octubre

    Lecture:
    - Presentación oral número 11: La Segunda República.

    - Introducción a La Guerra Civil Española

    Tutoría: El Rey Alfonso XIII



    Week 10: 11 de octubre

    Lecture:

    - Presentación número 12: Intervención internacional en la Guerra Civil Española
    - La Guerra Civil Española: causas y consecuencias.

    Tutoría: El franquismo


    Week 11: 18 de octubre

    Lecture:
    - Video: “Spain after Franco”
    - La España democrática.

    Tutoría: El Rey Juan Carlos I

    Essay number 2 due, Friday 20 October. (To be submitted by
    4:00 PM via MyUni)


    Week 12: 25 de octubre

    Lecture:

    FINAL TEST (2 hours) during normal lecture time


    Specific Course Requirements
    - Students must complete and pass SPAN 2101: Spanish IIA to enroll in this course. 
    - Students must be able to read at a higher level in Spanish to be able to deal with the written material in Spanish.
    - Students must be willing and able to participate in discussions in the Spanish language.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary

    ASSESSMENT TASK                                                 TASK TYPE                                  WEIGHTING               COURSE                                                                                                                                                                                   LEARNING OUTCOME(S)
         
    Research project / oral presentation Formative and summative 20% 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9
    Essay Formative and summative 40% 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9
    Mid-term test formative and summative 20% 1, 2 , 5, 8
    Final test Summative 20% 1, 2, 5, 8
    Assessment Related Requirements
    - Students must complete and submit all assessment tasks in order to pass this course. If a student fails to submit one or more assessment task they will receive a final mark of 49% or the actual mark they achieved, whichever is lower.


    Assessment Detail

    Research project and oral presentation:
    Working individually, students will conduct a research project in one of the topics allocated by
    the course coordinator, which will be the basis for a 15-minute oral presentation in Spanish on that topic....... 20% 

    Essay:
    Students will be required to write a 1500 word essay in Spanish on one of the 2 topics allocated
    by the course coordinator. Submission of the essay will depend on the date of the oral presentation............... 40%

    Mid-term test: 
    A 50-minute test to take place on week 7, which will include all the material covered
    in weeks 1 to 6, including information presented in the oral presentations and in the textbook....................... 20%

    Final test: 
    A 50-minute test to take place on week 13, which will included all the material  covered
    in weeks 7 to 12, including information presented in the oral presentations and in the textbook...................... 20%
    Submission
    Submission of assignments is via MyUni on the dates indicated in the "Program of Activities".
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

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    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

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