TECHCOMM 3005 - Technology Commercialisation

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2015

Aims This course has been designed for those who need a basic understanding of the concepts of successful commercialisation of innovation. Objectives Students will have a sound understanding of the processes, benefits and outcomes of commercializing innovations in a commercial environment. Students will be able to assess the intellectual property issues and other risks and prepare a business case. Syllabus The Commercialisation Process; Linking with Industry; Marketing & Business Communication of the commercialisation process; Economic factors; Risk factors; Intellectual Property; Technology transfer.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code TECHCOMM 3005
    Course Technology Commercialisation
    Coordinating Unit Entrepreneurship, Commercialisation & Innov Centre
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Course Description Aims
    This course has been designed for those who need a basic understanding of the concepts of successful commercialisation of innovation.
    Objectives
    Students will have a sound understanding of the processes, benefits and outcomes of commercializing innovations in a commercial environment. Students will be able to assess the intellectual property issues and other risks and prepare a business case.
    Syllabus
    The Commercialisation Process; Linking with Industry; Marketing & Business Communication of the commercialisation process; Economic factors; Risk factors; Intellectual Property; Technology transfer.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Laird Varzaly

    Name: Laird A. Varzaly

    Short Bio:
    Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering (BSEE),
    Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (MSNE),
    Master of Business Administration (MBA)

    Laird is an international management consultant specializing in the area of technology commercialisation. He has more than 25 years experience in technology research and development, manufacturing, international technology transfer, software development, marketing and telecommunications. His professional origin is Silicon Valley in California, one of the top research and development centres in the world. Here Laird gained valuable experience as an international manufacturing license project manager for the Nuclear Power Division of General Electric Company, a managerial leader and top ranking Fortune 500 Company. He then started his own company in international technology marketing and technology transfer to assist growing industries export their technologies ensuring that their customers received full benefits of their products. In addition, he was a partner in one of the first PC and software mail order businesses at the onset of the PC revolution.

    Subsequently Laird was headhunted by international recruiters to transfer to Australia as the CEO of Integrated Silicon Design Pty Ltd (ISD), a start-up company in CAD software and Electronic Identification Systems, which was the forerunner of smartcard and chip tagging technologies which are now prevalent both in Australia and internationally. After this company was sold he has become partner in several new technology start-ups and has been working as an international management consultant.

    Laird has participated in a range of technologies and projects that have required deep insight into high-level government decision making processes and medical industry functioning as well as electronic industry practices. With the intent to share his broad experience Laird has more recently contributed his time to occasional university lecturing.

    Email: laird.varzaly@adelaide.edu.au
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Opening intensive:
    Monday 27 to Wednesday 29 April 2015
    9am-6pm
    Napier 210

    Closing intensive:
    Monday 25 to Wednesday 27 May 2015
    9am-6pm
    Napier 210
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 Understand the subject of entrepreneurship to scientists and engineers geared around their unique perspective.
    2 Examine the core topics of commercialisation, opportunity, starting a company and building an effective team.
    3 Understand the development and protection of intellectual property and consider patents, trademarks, copyrights, trade secrets and licensing of intellectual property as a commercialisation strategy.
    4 Examine the critical aspects of strategy, from product development to market entry strategies, technology adoption patterns and their associated marketing strategies.
    5 Become familiar with financial strategy, funding of technology start-ups, funding of growing technology companies and technology valuation.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1-5
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 2-5
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 2,4,5
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 1-5
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 1-4
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 1-5
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 1-5
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 1-5
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    The University’s preferred textbook supplier is Unibooks: http://www.unibooks.com.au/

    Text book:
    Allen, K. (2010), Entrepreneurship for Scientists and Engineers. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, Pearson Prentiss Hall. ISBN-10: 0132357275 ISBN-13: 978-0132357272

    Readings made available through MyUni:
    Chapter 21 of the text: Information for capital expenditure decisions
    Langfield-Smith, K., Thorne, H., Hilton, R. (2009), Management Accounting: Information for Creating and Managing Value, Fifth Edition, McGraw-Hill Higher Education
    Total 1180 pages

    1. Carrithers, Ling and Bean, “Messy Problems and Lay Audiences: Teaching Critical Thinking Within The Finance Curriculum”, Business Communications Quarterly; Volume 71, Number 2, June 2008 Pgs 152-170.

    2. Simonin and Ozsomer, “Knowledge Processes and Learning Outcomes in MNCS: An Empirical Investigation of the Role of HRM Practices in Foreign Subsidiaries”, Human Resource Management, July-August 2009, Vol. 48, No. 4, Pgs 505-530.

    3. Karr, “Critical Thinking: A Critical Strategy for Financial Executives”, Financial Executive, December 2009.

    4. Aadland, “Values in Professional Practice: Towards a Critical Reflective Methodology”, Journal of Business Ethics, 2010, 97: Pgs 461-472.

    5. Batra, Kaushik and Kalia, “System Thinking: Strategic Planning”, SCMS Journal of Indian Management, October – December, 2010.

    6. Groysberg, Kelly and MacDonald, “The New Path To The C-Suite”, Harvard Business Review, March 2011, Pgs 60-68.

    7. Kanter, “Zoom In, Zoom Out”, Harvard Business Review, March 2011, Pgs 112-116.

    8. Keinz and Prugl, “A User Community-Based Approach to Leveraging Technological Competences: An Exploratory Case Study of a Technology Start-Up from MIT”, Creativity and Innovation Management, Volume 19, Number 3, 2010, Pgs 269-289.

    9. West and Noel, “The Impact of Knowledge Resources on New Venture Performance”, Journal of Small Business Management, 2009, 47(1), Pgs 1-22.

    10. Hsiao and Brown, “The Role of an Advisory Board in the Incubation Stage of a Technology-Based Start-Up”, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Canada.

    11. Evans-Pughe, “Do you have what it takes to start up a technology company?”, IEE Review, June 2004, Pgs 43-45. www.iee.org/review

    12. Andries and Debackere, “Adaption and Performance in New Businesses: Understanding the Moderating Effects of Independence and Industry”, Small Business Economics (2007) 29:81-99.

    13. Popovic, “Modelling the Marketing of High-Tech Start-Ups”, Journal of Targeting, Measurement and Analysis for Marketing”, Vol. 14, 3, Pgs 260-276.

    14. Kraft, J. & Ravix, J.-L. 2008, “Corporate governance and the governance of knowledge: rethinking and relationship in terms of corporate coherence”, Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Vol. 17, no. 1-2, Pgs 79-95.

    15. Anokhin, Wincent, Frishammar, 2011, “A conceptual framework for misfit technology commercialization”, Technology Forecasting & Social Change, Vol. 78, Pgs 1060-1071.
    Recommended Resources
    1. http://www.yet2.com
    2. http://www.nasa.gov/open/plan/technology-transfer.html 
    3. http://www.criticalthinking.org/aboutCT/define_critical_thinking.cfm 

    Library Resources
    The University of Adelaide’s Barr Smith Library provides a range of learning resources including texts, journals, periodicals, magazines, and access to online databases and information services. It also offers a virtual library which is accessible via the University’s website. The University Library web page is: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/library/ 
    From this link, you are able to access the Library's electronic resources.
    Online Learning
    MyUni is the University of Adelaide's online learning environment. It is used to support traditional face-to-face lectures, tutorials and workshops at the University. MyUni provides access to various features including announcements, course materials, discussion boards and assessments for each online course of study (see: https://myuni.adelaide.edu.au)
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    This is a draft schedule and session dates are a guide only. The timetable may be changed during the course delivery if necessary.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    As a guide, a 3 unit course comprises a total of 156 hours work (this includes face-to-face contact, any online components, and self directed study).
    Learning Activities Summary
    This is a draft schedule and session dates are a guide only. The timetable may be changed during the course delivery if necessary.
    Intensive
    Day
    Content Readings
    1 • Commercialisation
    • Opportunity
    Chapters 1&2
    Readings:
    1. Evans-Pughe, “Do you have what it takes to start up a technology company?”, IEE Review, June 2004, Pgs 43-45.
    2. Popovic, “Modelling the Marketing of High-Tech Start-Ups”, Journal of Targeting, Measurement and Analysis for Marketing”, Vol. 14, 3, Pgs 260-276
    2 • Starting a Company
    • Building a Team
    • Development & Protection of IP
    Chapters 3, 4 & 5
    Readings:
    1. Groysberg, Kelly and MacDonald, “The New Path To The C-Suite”, Harvard Business Review, March 2011, Pgs 60-68.
    2. Aadland, “Values in Professional Practice: Towards a Critical Reflective Methodology”, Journal of Business Ethics, 2010, 97: Pgs 461-472.
    3. Hsiao and Brown, “The Role of an Advisory Board in the Incubation Stage of a Technology-Based Start-Up”, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Canada.
    3 • Patents, Trade Marks, Trade Secrets, and Licensing of IP Reading:
    1. Anokhin, Wincent, Frishammar, 2011, “A conceptual framework for misfit technology commercialization”, Technology Forecasting & Social Change, Vol. 78, Pgs 1060-1071.

    Chapter 6
    Case Study – Skycar

    Case Study & Discussion
    4 • Critical Aspects of Strategy from Product Development to Marketing Strategy Chapters 7 & 8
    Readings:
    1. Batra, Kaushik and Kalia, “System Thinking: Strategic Planning”, SCMS Journal of Indian Management, October – December, 2010.
    2. Kanter, “Zoom In, Zoom Out”, Harvard Business Review, March 2011, Pgs 112-116.
    5 • Technology Adoption Patterns and Associated Marketing Strategies
    • Financial Strategy going deeper into Business Models
    • Fund Raising of Technology Start-ups
    Chapters 9, 10 & 11
    Readings:
    1. Andries and Debackere, “Adaption and Performance in New Businesses: Understanding the Moderating Effects of Independence and Industry”, Small Business Economics (2007) 29:81-99.
    2. Karr, “Critical Thinking: A Critical Strategy for Financial Executives”, Financial Executive, December 2009.
    3. Simonin and Ozsomer, “Knowledge Processes and Learning Outcomes in MNCS: An Empirical Investigation of the Role of HRM Practices in Foreign Subsidiaries”, Human Resource Management, July-August 2009, Vol. 48, No. 4, Pgs 505-530.
    6 • Funding Growing Technology Companies Chapters 12 & 13
    Chapter 21: “Information for Capital Expenditure Decisions”, Management Accounting: Information for Creating and Managing Value, Langfield-Smith Thorne Hilton
    Reading:
    Carrithers, Ling and Bean, “Messy Problems and Lay Audiences: Teaching Critical Thinking Within The Finance Curriculum”, Business Communications Quarterly; Volume 71, Number 2, June 2008 Pgs 152-170.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary

    An overview of the course assessment appears in the following Table. Details appear in the following section:

    #AssessmentLengthWeightingDue DateLearning Outcomes
    1 Assignment 1500 words 25% See MyUni 1-4
    2 Quiz 10% See MyUni 1-5
    3 Case Study 3000 words 55% See MyUni 1-5
    4 Participation 10% Ongoing 1-5
    Total 100%
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Students should attend all classes in order to pass the course. There is considerable experiential learning in workshops during the intensive classes that build your knowledge and thus enable you to be successful in this course.

    Course results are subject to moderation by the ECIC Board of Examiners
    Assessment Detail

    Assessment 1: Identify & Plan an Opportunity
    Weighting: 25%
    Submission Details: Online through MyUni

    Task:
    · Identify a technology with potential for commercialising from search and describe your process (e.g. patent, university, company, etc)
    · Identify a potential product opportunity with this technology
    · Discuss the anticipated development of this product opportunity and the IP implications
    · Discuss your vision of starting the company and building the team
    · Use at least two references to support your efforts

    Scope:
    This assignment will assess your understanding of the first 4 steps in the technology commercialisation process model presented in figure 1-2 of the text. A detailed analysis is not expected, but a clear understanding and expression of how it will be applied to your opportunity is required. You must find a new technology (e.g. from patent offices, corporate technology licensing sites, NASA, university technology sites, etc.) and not just rehash an old business plan. Discussion must be in regards to your specific technology and NOT in general terms.

    Length and Presentation:
    Approximately 1500 words in length

    Criteria by which your assignment will be marked:
    The standards by which the assignment will be assessed include clear and logical process presentation, completeness of process concepts, and full consideration of commercial implications in regards to the state of development of the technology chosen (e.g. time to market, anticipated market size, etc)



    Assessment 2: Quiz
    Weighting: 10%
    Submission Details: In-class

    Scope:
    The quiz is designed to assess the overall theoretical understanding of both text and readings. Material will incorporate all material covered in text, readings, and class discussion.



    Assessment 3: Case Study
    Weighting: 55%
    Submission Details: Online through MyUni

    Task:
    Choose one of the two cases that are on MyUni to apply the conceptual framework presented in this course in order to commercialise the technology. The case study should provide a concise discussion based upon the Commercialisation Process, but with particular emphasis on the Business Model, Financial Projection, Valuation, and the Funding Strategy.

    Scope:
    This assignment will assess your understanding of the all course topics.

    Length and Presentation:
    Approximately 3000 words in length

    Criteria by which your assignment will be marked:
    The standards by which the assignment will be assessed include the complete incorporation of the technology commercialisation process model concepts into your assessment of the case. There is no right or wrong answer, but your conclusions must be supported by clear and logical consideration based upon analysis. The emphasis must be on a clear development of the Business Model and Funding Strategy.



    Assessment 4: Participation
    Weighting: 10%
    Submission Details: In class

    Task:
    Active and knowledgeable involvement in class discussion and activities covering both text and reading material as relates to specifics of discussions.

    Scope:
    This will to assess your understanding of topics as well as provide indication of your ability to work with others in a team environment. Reading materials will be discussed and must be read prior to classes to insure participation and learning.

    Length and Presentation: N/A

    Criteria by which your participation will be marked:
    The standard for this activity will be both actual attendance in addition to active and fruitful participation in class discussion, activities, and in-class presentations as may be required as part of activities. Short quizzes may be used to indicate participation in the reading materials required for class discussions.

    Submission
    All text based assignments must be submitted via MyUni.
    Please refer to step by step instructions: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/myuni/tutorials/files/AssignmentStudentSubmission.pdf

    There are a few points to note about the submission of assignments:
    • Assignment Submission:  Assignments should not be emailed to the instructor; they must be lodged via the MyUni Course site (unless specified to do both). Note that assignments may be processed via TURNITIN, which is an online plagiarism prevention tool.
    • Cover Sheet:  Please submit, separate to your assignment, the completed University of Adelaide Assessment Cover Sheet providing details of yourself and your team members (if applicable), your assignment, the course, date submitted, etc. as well as the declaration signed by you that this is your (your team’s) work.  Note that the declaration on any electronically submitted assignment will be deemed to have the same authority as a signed declaration.
    • Backup Copy of Assignments:  You are advised to keep a copy of your assignments in case the submitted copy goes missing.  Please ensure that all assignment pages are numbered. If your assignment contains confidential information, you should discuss any concerns with the Course Lecturer prior to submission.
    • Extensions of Time:  Any request for an extension of time for the submission of an assignment should be made well before the due date of the assignment to the Course Lecturer.  Normally, extensions will only be granted for a maximum of two weeks from the original assignment submission date.  Extensions will only be granted in cases of genuine extenuating circumstances and proof, such as a doctor’s certificate, may be required.
    • Failure to submit: Failure to submit an assignment on time or by the agreed extension deadline may result in penalties and may incur a fail grade.  Note that a late penalty of 5% of the total available marks for that assessment item will be incurred each day an assignment is handed in late (Unless otherwise stated in 'Assessment Related Requirements' or 'Assessment Detail' above) Assignments handed in after 14 days from the due submission date will fail even if a 100% mark is granted for the work.

    Resubmission & Remarking

    Resubmission of an assignment for remarking after reworking it to obtain a better mark will not normally be accepted.  Approval for resubmission will only be granted on medical or compassionate grounds.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

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    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

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  • Policies & Guidelines
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