MECH ENG 4143A - Honours Project Part A

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2017

The Mechanical Engineering Honours Project is the capstone course for all programmes in the school. Students will undertake a year-long project in groups of one to five, with each group directly supervised by at least one Mechanical Engineering academic staff member. Projects are often run in collaboration with industry sponsors or in conjunction with ongoing research projects within the school. Strong emphasis is placed on engineering design processes; most projects incorporating some aspect of mechanical build into their project, with fabrication overseen by our in-house workshop staff. All projects are required to follow industry standard project management and risk assessment procedures, assessed continuously over the course of the project. Workshops are presented to introduce students to issues surrounding intellectual property and other legal aspects of engineering, business and human resource matters, ethics, and accounting. Students are assessed on the quality of their engineering work and engineering communication, via deliverables including written reports and oral presentations. The honours project runs as two consecutive courses, MECH ENG 4143A in semester 1 then 4143B in semester 2, and can only be undertaken in this order; mid-year entry students cannot be accommodated.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code MECH ENG 4143A
    Course Honours Project Part A
    Coordinating Unit School of Mechanical Engineering
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Contact Up to 48 hours lectures/tutorials, 20 hours individual supervision, 180 hours project
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Course Description The Mechanical Engineering Honours Project is the capstone course for all programmes in the school. Students will undertake a year-long project in groups of one to five, with each group directly supervised by at least one Mechanical Engineering academic staff member. Projects are often run in collaboration with industry sponsors or in conjunction with ongoing research projects within the school. Strong emphasis is placed on engineering design processes; most projects incorporating some aspect of mechanical build into their project, with fabrication overseen by our in-house workshop staff. All projects are required to follow industry standard project management and risk assessment procedures, assessed continuously over the course of the project. Workshops are presented to introduce students to issues surrounding intellectual property and other legal aspects of engineering, business and human resource matters, ethics, and accounting. Students are assessed on the quality of their engineering work and engineering communication, via deliverables including written reports and oral presentations. The honours project runs as two consecutive courses, MECH ENG 4143A in semester 1 then 4143B in semester 2, and can only be undertaken in this order; mid-year entry students cannot be accommodated.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr William Robertson

    EMPP coordinator: Assoc. Prof. Reza Ghomashchi
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Workshops will be given in the allocated lecture timeslots relating to content required to complete the course requirements. Please refer to the complete schedule on MyUni for further details.



  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

     
    1 Conduct a research/development project with graduate-level engineering skills.
    2 Manage a small group undertaking a project, including professional documentation activities and processes.
    3 Perform market analysis and/or literature review to demonstrate gaps requiring project/research work.
    4 Develop a project plan using best practise project management techniques, including project risk and personnel/equipment safety analyses.
    5 Orally present work in a seminar style to a large group with widely varying degrees of technical knowledge.
    6 Present work at a large exposition, including poster and booth preparation and design.
    7 Prepare a well-written technical report detailing the project.
    8 Develop an appreciation of and demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics, and relationship to the profession of engineering, of professional procedures and practices; these include law, ethics, human resources, accounting, and business.

     
    The above course learning outcomes are aligned with the Engineers Australia Stage 1 Competency Standard for the Professional Engineer.
    The course is designed to develop the following Elements of Competency: 1.1   1.2   1.3   1.4   1.5   1.6   2.1   2.2   2.3   2.4   3.1   3.2   3.3   3.4   3.5   3.6   

    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1-8
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1-8
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    1-8
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    1-8
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    1-8
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    1-8
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Students will be expected to conduct thorough literature reviews in their chosen areas of application to gain the knowledge they need to satisfactorily complete their project. Specific additional resources (software/hardware/guidance) will be supplied as necessary by each project supervisor.
    Recommended Resources
    • Document preparation and bibliography management software, such as LaTeX and BibTeX, or Microsoft Word and Endnote.
    • Gantt Chart software such as Microsoft Project or an open source equivalent.
    • Engineering drawing software such as Inventor, and the engineering drawing standards to produce professional-quality drawings for fabrication.
    Online Learning
    A large repetoire of information relating to technical drawing, document preparation, seminar presentations, and so on, will be made available through MyUni.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The primary interaction each student will have for their project is through their principle supervisor. Some projects will also have co-supervisors and/or external supervisors/sponsors/partners. In addition, workshops will be given throughout the year to assist in the management of the project and its deliverables.

    The supervisor's role is to provide advice and guidance, and to ensure that the project proceeds in a fruitful direction. You should not expect your supervisor to do your thinking for you, or to tell you exactly what to do. You are expected to generate your own ideas, to seek out information for yourself, and to make your own decisions about what to do and how to do it. You should make arrangements with your supervisor for WEEKLY CONSULTATIONS at which progress may be reported, discussed and assessed.

    Your supervisor is responsible for signing off on all engineering drawings, workshop (fabrication) requests, purchase requests, re-imbursements, and so on.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Honours projects are only successful with consistent application of time and effort over the entire year.

    According to University policy 669, for a nine-unit course the minimum structured workload is 108 hours with a total expected student workload of 468 hours. This equates to twelve hours per week for thirty weeks (twelve weeks per semester, plus six weeks during breaks) for individual or group project work, not counting workshops and supervision meetings.

    Students must manage this time as convenient for their own schedules; this might be three blocks of four hours spread throughout each week, for example. This time must be logged weekly and included in the final report.

    The structured workload of 108 hours is broken down into: 1hr supervision meeting per week (30 hours); workshops (54 hours, one/two per week); seminar attendance (8 hours); expo attendance (16 hours).
    Learning Activities Summary
    Workshops will include:
    1. Project Expectations & Organisation
    2. Project Management and Risk Management
    3. OH&S and laboratories
    4. Protecting IP and Importance of a workbook
    5. Journal Writing
    6. Reference Search & Literature Review
    7. Design and technical drawing for fabrication and machining
    8. Report Writing 1
    9. Report Writing 2
    10. Report Writing 3
    11. Report Writing 4
    12. Creating graphs for reports and presentations
    13. Documents using LaTeX
    14. Risk Management Safety System-RMSS
    15. Postgraduate Information Session
    16. Seminar Instructions
    17. Poster workshop
    18. Seminar presentation
    19. Organisation of exhibition
    20. Financial Accounting
    21. Business for Engineers
    22. Marketing for Engineers
    23. Human Resource Management
    24. Ethics
    25. Law for Engineers
    More information will be made available on each of these topics through MyUni.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Each project group is expected to meet with their supervisor(s) for approximately one hour per week.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment for the honours project is broken down over the entire year as follows:

    What When Marks (%)
    Project charter Sem 1, Week 4 7
    Preliminary report Sem 1, Week 12 10
    Seminar Sem 2, mid-sem break 10
    Expo Sem 2, Week 12 10
    Final report Sem 2, Week 11 50
    Student performance N/A 7
    Meeting minutes Weekly 2
    Online quizes Various 4
    TOTAL 100


    Assessment Related Requirements
    Strict deadlines must be enforced for equity purposes. A penalty of 5% per 12 hours or part thereof applies for late submission of written assessment.

    Written assessment is subject to strict word limits; please see the Course Handbook for further information.
    Assessment Detail
    Please see the Course Handbook for more detailed information.
    Submission
    All written assessment is to be submitted through MyUni.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    NOG (No Grade Associated)
    Grade Description
    CN Continuing

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    Custom supervisor SELTs are provided at the Expo event for students to complete. 

    For supervision concerns during the year, students should approach the course coordinator and/or the head of school as soon as possible to resolve any possible conflicts or disputes.
  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.