HIST 2084 - Europe in War and Revolution 1913-1933

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2022

Between 1913 and 1933, the peoples of Europe experienced a world war, revolutions and civil wars, and the rise of dictatorships in Russia, Germany and elsewhere. But this was also a period of spectacular achievements in the fields of the arts, intellectual life, and science. This course explores the epic history of this period from the perspective of some of the prominent individuals who lived through it. Each student will choose an individual historical figure whose life and career s/he will trace through the great events of the period, with a particular focus on the years 1913 and 1933. We shall explore the links between the chosen characters and build a social network map to explore these connections. By pooling their knowledge of specific individuals, students will build up a broader picture of what it meant to live through this amazing period of history.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code HIST 2084
    Course Europe in War and Revolution 1913-1933
    Coordinating Unit History
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 12 units of Level I undergraduate study
    Course Description Between 1913 and 1933, the peoples of Europe experienced a world war, revolutions and civil wars, and the rise of dictatorships in Russia, Germany and elsewhere. But this was also a period of spectacular achievements in the fields of the arts, intellectual life, and science. This course explores the epic history of this period from the perspective of some of the prominent individuals who lived through it. Each student will choose an individual historical figure whose life and career s/he will trace through the great events of the period, with a particular focus on the years 1913 and 1933. We shall explore the links between the chosen characters and build a social network map to explore these connections. By pooling their knowledge of specific individuals, students will build up a broader picture of what it meant to live through this amazing period of history.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Gareth Pritchard

    Email: gareth.pritchard@adelaide.edu.au
    Phone: 8313 4529
    Office: Napier 306
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    The formal contact hours for this course consist of: 1 x two-hour lecture per week (in-person attendance is optional as all lectures are recorded); 1 x two-hour workshop per week.

    Full details are available on the Course Planner.






  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    By the end of the course, students will be able to:
    1 Demonstrate a broad knowledge of the history of the Europe between 1913 and 1933.
    2 Apply their contextual knowledge (a) to understanding the lives and careers of one category of individuals in the Europe (e.g. ballet dancers, scientists etc.) and (b) to studying the life and career of one individual in that field.
    3 Use relevant technologies both to identify relevant primary and secondary sources and to evaluate data.
    4 Critically evaluate the strengths and shortcomings of relevant primary and secondary sources.
    5 Arrive at independent conclusions regarding the lives and careers of people who lived through the period 1913 to 1933.
    6 Co-operate effectively in research teams with other students.
    7 Communicate their findings, both orally and in writing, by constructing evidence-based arguments that comply with the scholarly and ethical conventions of the discipline of history.
    8 Demonstrate the ability to construct and interpret an historical database and a social network map.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)

    Attribute 1: Deep discipline knowledge and intellectual breadth

    Graduates have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of their subject area, the ability to engage with different traditions of thought, and the ability to apply their knowledge in practice including in multi-disciplinary or multi-professional contexts.

    1, 2, 4

    Attribute 2: Creative and critical thinking, and problem solving

    Graduates are effective problems-solvers, able to apply critical, creative and evidence-based thinking to conceive innovative responses to future challenges.

    2, 3, 4, 5

    Attribute 3: Teamwork and communication skills

    Graduates convey ideas and information effectively to a range of audiences for a variety of purposes and contribute in a positive and collaborative manner to achieving common goals.

    3, 4, 5, 7

    Attribute 4: Professionalism and leadership readiness

    Graduates engage in professional behaviour and have the potential to be entrepreneurial and take leadership roles in their chosen occupations or careers and communities.

    6, 7

    Attribute 5: Intercultural and ethical competency

    Graduates are responsible and effective global citizens whose personal values and practices are consistent with their roles as responsible members of society.

    6, 7

    Attribute 7: Digital capabilities

    Graduates are well prepared for living, learning and working in a digital society.

    6, 7, 8

    Attribute 8: Self-awareness and emotional intelligence

    Graduates are self-aware and reflective; they are flexible and resilient and have the capacity to accept and give constructive feedback; they act with integrity and take responsibility for their actions.

    6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    There is no course textbook for this course. Instead, every student will be assigned a biography or memoir that focuses on the life of the individual that the student has chosen to study. Each student will be expected to read this biography/memoir.
    Recommended Resources
    The literature on the period 1913 to 1933 is vast. The following are some useful introductions to the period:

    + Beckett, I.F.W. 2007. The Great War, 1914-1918.
    + De Groot, Gerard J. 2000. The First World War.
    + Facos, Michelle and Sharon L. Hirsch. 2003. Art, Culture, and National Identity in Fin-de-Siècle Europe.
    + Fischer, Conan. 2010. Europe Between Democracy and Dictatorship, 1900-1945.
    + Jackson, Julian. 2002. Europe, 1900-1945.
    + Keegan, John. 1999. The First World War.
    + Kershaw, Angela. 2007. Women in Europe Between the Wars: Politics, Culture and Society.
    + Kitchen, Martin. 1988. Europe Between the Wars: A Political History.
    + Martel, Gordon (ed.). 2011. A Companion to EuropeL 1900-1945.
    + Saler, Michael (ed.). The Fin-de-Siècle World.
    + Strachan, Hew. 2008. World War I: A History.












    Online Learning
    Myuni forms a very important part of this course. Students construct a course wiki in Myuni, and we also use Myuni to create a course database on the individuals whom we study. In addition to recordings of lectures, Myuni will also contain a wide range of quizzes, bibliographies, databases, and other materials,
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The course is structured around the chronology of the great events that took place between 1913 and 1933. However, what aspects of the period we focus on will depend on students. The course is highly interactive.

    The lectures will give basic historical context but they will also cover issues that the students request. As they research their chosen characters, students may want more information about specific aspects of the political, social, cultural, and economic life of the period in question.

    In the workshops, we will look in depth at specific themes, for example the role of women, revolutionary ideas, new cultural movements, influential philosophical theories. Students themselves will have a say on which themes we cover.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    This course is designed to involve a total of 156 hours of study, including formal contact hours (3 hours per week), private study, the research and writing of assessments, and preparation for the examination.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Workshops:

    Preparation for tutorials will usually involve reading a short text (which will be supplied in advance) or looking at some documents from the the booklet of primary sources (which is available on Myuni). Every workshop is different but they are usually structured around specific learning activities that involve small-group discussion and class discussion. The workshops will also be used to revise the information that we covered in lectures and to address any questions that students might have.

    Lectures:

    At the beginning of the course students will be given a long list of historical individuals divided into four categories: politics, arts & sciences, armed forces, royalty & nobility. These are further subdivided into specific fields, e.g. literature, music, radical politics etc.

    Students will be asked to track the career of their chosen character as we move through the course chronologically. In the lectures we will collate information on in order to build up a group biography of the categories and fields in question.

    Private study:

    Most of the time available to students for private study will be taken up with (i) general reading in preparation for lectures and tutorials, (ii) researching the biography of their assigned historical character; (iii) researching and writing their assessments.

    Specific Course Requirements
    N/A
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    The assessment regime for this course consists of four components:

    Assessment Task Task Type Due Learning Outcome
    Short research exercise. Formative and summative. Second half of first term. 3
    Character profile Formative and summative. First half of second term. 3, 4, 5, 7
    Research essay Summative. End of second term. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

    Specific deadlines for the submission of coursework will be given to students at the outset of the course.
    Assessment Related Requirements
    N/A
    Assessment Detail
    The research exercise will require students to compile information on their chosen character, and to submit this to a database. The database will in turn become an important learning tool for the whole class.

    The character profile will be compiled by students as we move through the course chronologically. It will be Myuni as part of a wiki, and it will be visible to other students. The character profile will chart the biography of the student's chosen historical individual and discuss how the individual's personal history relates to the big themes that we cover in the course. The character profile will also identify connections with the characters of other students, e.g. familial connections, friendships, rivalries, shared experiences etc.

    Towards the end of the course, students will submit their main assessment, which is a research essay. Essay titles will be distributed to students at the commencement of the course.





    Submission
    All assessed work will be submitted on-line via Myuni. The deadline for the submission of assessments is 23:59 on the day of submission. Due dates are given in the course handbook (available on Myuni).
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    In addition to SELTs, students will have the opportunity to provide feedback during the course itself. Each category of students (actors, artists, film-makers, revolutionaries, writers etc.) will elect a "deputy". On a regular basis there will be brief "council of deputies" in which the elected representatives meet with the course convenor (either at the end of lectures or electronically). The deputies will be encouraged to use this opportunity to give feedback on how the course is progressing, and to deal with any issues that have arisen.

    Once SELTs have been submitted and the results analysed, the course convenor will write a response which is circulated to all students.
  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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