GEOG 2138 - Population and Health

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2022

This course aims to introduce students to demographic and geographical perspectives in the study of population health. It provides students with the theoretical foundation, empirical knowledge, and analytical skills to unravel the linkages between the distribution and determinants of health-related states and the environment in populations. It examines health variations between diverse groups of the population differentiated by demographic and socio-economic characteristics and between different spatial scales with differing environmental characteristics and problems. There will be a particular focus on population mobility (migration, displacement) and health. As environmental pressures, especially climate change, intensify in many regions of the world, the interactions between migration and health will become significant. An increased understanding of the intersections between climate (environmental) change, migration, and human health is a pressing need to inform policy response. While this course focuses on the Australian population and health situations, students will learn about the significant population and health issues globally, especially in the Asia-Pacific region. The course will examine health and disease patterns, causal mechanisms, and different outcomes in populations and discuss what policy and interventions will be needed to address health challenges, including the consequential COVID-19 pandemics.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code GEOG 2138
    Course Population and Health
    Coordinating Unit Geography, Environment and Population
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 12 units of Level I undergraduate study
    Incompatible GEST 2038, GEST 2016 or GEST 3016
    Course Description This course aims to introduce students to demographic and geographical perspectives in the study of population health. It provides students with the theoretical foundation, empirical knowledge, and analytical skills to unravel the linkages between the distribution and determinants of health-related states and the environment in populations. It examines health variations between diverse groups of the population differentiated by demographic and socio-economic characteristics and between different spatial scales with differing environmental characteristics and problems. There will be a particular focus on population mobility (migration, displacement) and health. As environmental pressures, especially climate change, intensify in many regions of the world, the interactions between migration and health will become significant. An increased understanding of the intersections between climate (environmental) change, migration, and human health is a pressing need to inform policy response. While this course focuses on the Australian population and health situations, students will learn about the significant population and health issues globally, especially in the Asia-Pacific region. The course will examine health and disease patterns, causal mechanisms, and different outcomes in populations and discuss what policy and interventions will be needed to address health challenges, including the consequential COVID-19 pandemics.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Associate Professor Yan Tan

    Associate Professor Yan Tan (Course Coordinator)
    Room G32, Ground Level, Napier Building
    Phone: 8313 3976
    Email: yan.tan@adelaide.edu.au
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Two-hour Lecture each week
    One-hour Tutorial each week

     
    Lectures

    Tuesdays 12noon – 2pm, Napier 208 Lecture Theatre

    NOTE: Tutorials start in Week 2.

     
    Consultation Time: Tuesdays 9:00am–11:00am. I will be available in my office during
    this time.

    Any other times are by appointment only. Please feel free to arrange a meeting after class or by phone or email.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:
    1. Have an in-depth understanding of the spatial organisation of human health’s demographic, economic, socio-cultural, environmental, and political determinants.
    2. Understand the theoretical foundation and empirical knowledge to examine the linkages between the distribution and determinants of health, fertility and mortality in the world populations.
    3. Understand health and healthcare variations between different sub-groups of the population in Australia and other parts of the world.
    4. Develop a solid ability to analyse issues relating to population and health research and develop problem-solving, analytical, and high-level written and presentation skills.
    5. Have the ability to assess health policies in Australia at national, state, and regional levels, which can impinge upon the health and well-being of sub-groups of the population.
    6. Understand cutting-edge issues in the research field of migration, climate (environmental) change, and health.
    7. Synthesise evidence, interpret health and disease patterns, causal mechanisms and outcomes, and suggest effective policies and interventions addressing health challenges.


    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)

    Attribute 1: Deep discipline knowledge and intellectual breadth

    Graduates have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of their subject area, the ability to engage with different traditions of thought, and the ability to apply their knowledge in practice including in multi-disciplinary or multi-professional contexts.

    1,2,3,4,5,6,7

    Attribute 2: Creative and critical thinking, and problem solving

    Graduates are effective problems-solvers, able to apply critical, creative and evidence-based thinking to conceive innovative responses to future challenges.

    4,5,6,7

    Attribute 3: Teamwork and communication skills

    Graduates convey ideas and information effectively to a range of audiences for a variety of purposes and contribute in a positive and collaborative manner to achieving common goals.

    4,5,6,7

    Attribute 4: Professionalism and leadership readiness

    Graduates engage in professional behaviour and have the potential to be entrepreneurial and take leadership roles in their chosen occupations or careers and communities.

    1,4,5,6,7

    Attribute 5: Intercultural and ethical competency

    Graduates are responsible and effective global citizens whose personal values and practices are consistent with their roles as responsible members of society.

    3,4,5,6,7

    Attribute 6: Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural competency

    Graduates have an understanding of, and respect for, Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander values, culture and knowledge.

    This is not covered in this course.

    Attribute 7: Digital capabilities

    Graduates are well prepared for living, learning and working in a digital society.

    4,5,7

    Attribute 8: Self-awareness and emotional intelligence

    Graduates are self-aware and reflective; they are flexible and resilient and have the capacity to accept and give constructive feedback; they act with integrity and take responsibility for their actions.

    1,2,3,5,6,7
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    • There is no prescribed text for this course as there is no textbook that deals with both the demographic and geographical aspects in the study of population health.
    • There are bodies of research on population health and numerous data sources widely available. Students will need to have access to a computer and the ability to obtain data and publications through the websites of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW), the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), the Population Reference Bureau (PRB), the World Health Organisation (WHO), and other websites suggested for relevant publications.
    • Students will be provided with a comprehensive list of readings, including a suite of refereed journal articles, books, book chapters, and online materials on the subject relevant to the lecture and tutorials each week. Suggested readings are made available through MyUni\Course Readings for students’ easy access.
    • All other required materials (e.g. Lecture recordings, Lecture slides, Assessment information, and web links) are also provided on MyUni.
    Recommended Resources
    Access to a computer and ability to obtain data and publications through a range of useful websites including the following useful websites.

    Useful websites
    • World Health Organisation (WHO): WHO is a specialised agency of the United Nations concerned with international public health. It collates enormous data on communicable diseases, particularly COVID-19, HIV/AIDS, Ebola, malaria and tuberculosis, and non-communicable diseases, including sexual and reproductive health, development, and ageing. Its publications also include nutrition, food security and healthy eating, occupational health, and substance abuse. https://www.who.int/en
    • The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW): being Australia's leading health and welfare statistics agency; holding valuable data on many health and welfare issues and topics, widely used by government, researchers, policymakers and the community for the betterment of all Australians; producing high-quality reports and other information products, on crucial health and welfare issues in Australia. https://www.aihw.gov.au/
    • The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS): providing data and publications relating to the content of the Australian population census and other information relating to surveys and data sources. https://www.abs.gov.au/
    • eatforhealth.gov.au: publishing Australian Dietary Guidelines, providing advice about the amount and kinds of foods we need to eat for health and wellbeing. https://www.eatforhealth.gov.au/
    • The Population Reference Bureau (PRB): gathering and supplying statistics necessary for studies that address the environment and populations' health and structure. It covers a range of health domains, including Environment, Coronavirus, HIV/AIDS, Ageing, Population Trends, Fertility, Mortality, Inequality, and Reproductive Health. https://www.prb.org/


    Online Learning
    MyUni/Canvas

    MyUni/Canvas is a critical learning tool and means of communication and knowledge exchange in this course. Learning materials are available each week in preparation for our workshop. Other course material (e.g. Readings, Assessment information) and many features of MyUni/Canvas (e.g. Announcements and the Discussion Board) will help students organise and manage their studies.
    Online learning is facilitated through ECO 360 recording of lectures and getting students to access websites of the World Health Organisation (WHO), the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW), the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), the Population Reference Bureau (PRB) etc.

    Students need to regularly check the MyUni/Canvas website and use MyUni/Canvas for the different assignments (for information and submission).

    To reach the MyUni website for the course, please follow the links from the University of Adelaide's Homepage http://www.adelaide.edu.au or go straight to https://myuni.adelaide.edu.au/. You will need to enter your username and password to enter the MyUni website. If you have difficulty accessing MyUni, please contact the Help Desk at 8313 3335 or send an e-mail to myuni.help@adelaide.edu.au (See http://www.adelaide.edu.au/myuni; http://www.adelaide.edu.au/its/help/contact_details/).
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The teaching in this course is based on student-centred learning principles and strategies. Students are seen as partners in the learning trajectory. The course employs a blended approach to teaching and learning: face-to-face interactions in class are supplemented by effective use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) and the online teaching and learning environment of MyUni/Canvas.

    This course will use a mixed-method approach consisting of lectures and tutorials. The course lectures will provide fundamental factual information and concepts about population and health issues, introducing demographic analysis, measurement and health resources and access to them. Lectures will be recorded and uploaded to MyUni for students to access online.

    Tutorials will encompass discussion, debate, critical thinking and problem solving of complex population health issues in Australia and globally. Students will have tutorial questions or topics and suggested readings on MyUni/Canvas, which need to be read before the tutorials to be very active and participatory. The tutorials will allow students to lead the tutorial discussion for a selected topic, present a written list of key points on that set topic, and raise further questions or points of interest for discussions.

    Interactive and collaborative teaching and learning thus take place inside and outside the classroom. Students learn critical thinking and problem-solving skills and work collaboratively in lectures and tutorials.

    The Discussion board at MyUni will be used to facilitate online learning. It is a helpful platform where: 1) students raise questions for clarification and comment on other students’ posts; 2) I will provide answers to or comments on students’ queries. Would you please post the questions that you might have there? I will answer your questions promptly.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is suggested as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements to complete the course. You will need to allocate appropriate time for your study (structured and self-directed time). University policies suggest for a 3-unit course that there should be a minimum workload of 156 hours of learning activities in the semester.

    ·      Lectures:  2-hour lectures per week

    ·      Tutorials:  1-hour tutorial per week

    ·      Reading and preparation:  6 hours per week

    ·      Research and access to MyUni:  2.5 hours per week

    ·      Preparation for assignments:  2 hours per week

    Learning Activities Summary
    Key topics:
    • Defining health, health-related indicators, and data sources
    • Global demographic and epidemiological transitions: Concepts and causes
    • COVID-19 pandemic, mobility, and global health challenges
    • Australian health system and issues
    • Global fertility and reproductive health
    • Fertility in Australia and South Australia
    • Children's mortality and health globally
    • Active children in Australia
    • Health and wellbeing of older people
    • Population ageing and ageing healthily in Australia
    • Housing, stress and health
    • Obesity, public health interventions and diet
    • Migration and AIDS
    • Humanitarian migrants' wellbeing
    • Urbanisation, migration, pollution and health challenges in developing countries
    • Social Inequality and Health
    • Climate change and health
    • Climate extremes: Adaptation in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) communities
    • Addressing the three-way nexus between migration, climate change and human health
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Weighting   Learning Objectives
    1. Tutorial attendance & participation      
     
    Formative, summative  10% 1-7
    2. Poster presentation

    Summative  20% 2,3,4
    3. Research essay (1,800–2,000 words)     
           
    Summative 35% 1-7
    4. Take home final task (1,800–2,000 words)

    Summative 35% 1-7
    Assessment Related Requirements
    To be able to pass the course you need to attend tutorials, complete and submit all assessment requirements described in the course profile for assessment, and sit the exam.

    The Harvard (author-date) referencing system must be used for the written assignments. Your work needs to include references.

    Assessment Detail
    1.    Tutorial Attendance and Participation (10%)

    Tutorials are the forum where we discuss the subject matter and have small group work exercises to consolidate the knowledge. Tutorial attendance is a compulsory component of the course and is monitored during the course. Students will be reviewed as to their attendance and participation throughout the course. Students need to notify the Course Coordinator via email (yan.tan@adelaide.edu.au) as soon as possible if they have to miss a tutorial. They need written evidence (e.g. medical certificate; a note from the employer; counsellor's letter) if they have to miss one. They are strongly encouraged to attend all cheduled tutorials. All students are expected to be well prepared for each tutorial and actively discuss the questions raised by the teaching staff and emerged from each week's readings.

    2.  Poster Presentation (20%)

    This assessment seeks to critically examine individual understandings of real-world population and health issues: causes, distributions, consequences, and policy challenges. The poster presentation is the chance to showcase the critical thinking and analytical capability of key population and health issues and demonstrate the highest standard of ‘public’ communication in an oral presentation.

    3. Research Essay (35%)

    The Research Essay provides an opportunity for students to develop and demonstrate research, analytical, and critical thinking skills. The essay's topics (or questions) are centred around Population and Health issues and policy interventions. Students are required to choose one topic from the three topics (or questions) set for this assignment and write a paper that critically analyses the chosen topic using case studies and peer-reviewed literature.
     
    4.  Take Home Final Task (35%)

    Submission
    Submission:

    All assignments must be submitted electronically via MyUni/Canvas. To check for plagiarism, we use TURNITIN. The last possible time for submission is always midnight on the due date.


    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.