GEOG 2135 - Urban Futures

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2022

More than half the world's population live in cities, making humanity a predominantly urban species. Drawing on Australian and international examples, this course explores the processes, potentialities and problems of urbanisation. It introduces students to different ways of explaining growth and change within cities; the diversity which exists across cities; different ways of experiencing the city; and how urban inequalities - such as in housing - are exacerbated and addressed. Students will examine the environmental consequences of urbanisation, prospects for creating sustainable cities and the role of urban governance in securing social and environmental justice.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code GEOG 2135
    Course Urban Futures
    Coordinating Unit Geography, Environment and Population
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 4 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 12 units of Level I undergraduate study
    Incompatible GEST 2035, GEST 2020 or GEST 3020
    Course Description More than half the world's population live in cities, making humanity a predominantly urban species. Drawing on Australian and international examples, this course explores the processes, potentialities and problems of urbanisation. It introduces students to different ways of explaining growth and change within cities; the diversity which exists across cities; different ways of experiencing the city; and how urban inequalities - such as in housing - are exacerbated and addressed. Students will examine the environmental consequences of urbanisation, prospects for creating sustainable cities and the role of urban governance in securing social and environmental justice.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Associate Professor John Tibby

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Knowledge
    1. Demonstrated understanding of key theories of urbanisation and urban change.
    2. Demonstrated understanding of concepts and debates in urban studies.
    3. Key issues facing Australian and selected overseas cities.
    4. Critical understanding of current urban policies and programs.

    Skills
    1. Locate, synthesise and critically engage with urban research.
    2. Ability to identify, locate and analyse primary data sources.
    3. High level written and verbal communication skills.
    4. Ability to work constructively in large and small groups.
    5. Construct and communicate logical and appropriately supported arguments.



    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)

    Attribute 1: Deep discipline knowledge and intellectual breadth

    Graduates have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of their subject area, the ability to engage with different traditions of thought, and the ability to apply their knowledge in practice including in multi-disciplinary or multi-professional contexts.

    1,2,3,4

    Attribute 2: Creative and critical thinking, and problem solving

    Graduates are effective problems-solvers, able to apply critical, creative and evidence-based thinking to conceive innovative responses to future challenges.

    1,2,3,4

    Attribute 3: Teamwork and communication skills

    Graduates convey ideas and information effectively to a range of audiences for a variety of purposes and contribute in a positive and collaborative manner to achieving common goals.

    7,8,9

    Attribute 4: Professionalism and leadership readiness

    Graduates engage in professional behaviour and have the potential to be entrepreneurial and take leadership roles in their chosen occupations or careers and communities.

    6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources

    There are no required text books for this course. The course makes considerable use of recently published journal articles.
    All required reading will be available in MyUni.
    Recommended Resources
    Recommended Resources
    Students are encouraged to make use of the following books – all are available in the Barr

    Gottdiener, M., Budd, L., and Lehtovuori, P. (2016). Key Concepts in Urban Studies. Los Angeles: SAGE

    Harding, A., Blokland, T. (2014). Urban Theory: A critical introduction to power, cities and urbanism in the 21st century.  London: SAGE Publications Ltd.

    Seto, K., Solecki, W., and Griffith, C. (2016). The Routledge Handbook of Urbanization and Global Environmental Change. London: Routldege.

    Short., JR. (2014). Urban theory: A critical assessment. London: Palgrave Macmillan Education.



    Key Journals
    Australian Geographer                      Cities                                                                     
    City                                                    Environment & Urbanization            
    Health and Place                               Housing Policy Debate                    
    Housing Studies                                International Journal of Urban and Regional Research
    Journal of Urban Affairs                     Local Environment
    Professional Geographer                  Progress in Human Geography      
    Social and Cultural Geography          Sustainable Cities and Society        
    Urban Ecosystems                             Urban Geography                                              
    Urban Policy and Research                 Urban Studies

    Online Learning
    This course makes extensive use of MyUni for communication and delivery of course materials.
    All online lectures, and required SGD reading and resources will be made available on MyUni.

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Primary modes of learning in this course will be online lectures, case-study reading (tutorials), facilitated tutorial discussion, assignment preparation, peer engagement. Students will be allocated reading and will be required to read and report back to the class on their article/chapter.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    While the relative proportion of contact and non-contact time may vary from course to course, a full-time student should expect to spend, on average, about 44 hours per week on her/his studies during teaching periods. Urban Futures, being a 3-unit course, will require 12 hours of work per week including class-time. Assignments and readings have been calculated on this basis.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Theme 1: Inter-urban relations
    Settlement patterns & national urban systems
    World cities & spatial divisions of labour
    Global Cities and Global City Networks
    Ordinary Cities: Critique of the global cities thesis

    Theme 2: Intra-urban relations
    From industrial cities to creative cities
    Governing the city
    What role should planning play in shaping our cities?
    Engaging communities in urban planning
    Right to the City
    Governing the city and governmentality
        
    Theme 3: Urban fabric
    Urban travel - transport and mobility
    Public space and experiencing the city
    Environmental consequences of urban life
    Sustainable Urban Practices
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary

    No information currently available.

    Assessment Related Requirements


    Students must complete and submit all components of assessment. Students who do not complete and submit all components of assessment will be given a fail grade for the course.

    Attendance at tutorials and the field trip is compulsory. Students may be excused from attending one tutorial on medical or
    compassionate grounds (E.g. family illness, urgent carer responsibilities). Students unable to attend a tutorial must notify the course coordinator by email prior to the session and provide a medical certificate/statement for compassionate grounds when they return to class. Students who do not attend all tutorials and do not provide reasonable grounds (medical/ compassionate) for
    non-attendance will automatically fail the participation component of the course.

    Assessment Detail

    No information currently available.

    Submission

    No information currently available.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    This course was previously run in 2018 and students enjoyed the range of topics covered, the lively discussions and the variety and the choice of assessment.  2018 SELTs are not available but feedback from previous years has led to a shift from all online lectures to a combination of online and face-to-face lectures. Moving from tutorial to small group discovery sessions.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.