TECHCOMM 3050 - ECIC Study Tour ? The Entrepreneurial Experience

North Terrace Campus - Trimester 3 - 2015

This course is an intensive overseas study tour, with up to 80 contact hours expected. The Study Tour will involve visiting an overseas location for approximately two weeks, and will involve academic seminars, group work, industry and government visits and cultural activities. This course is focussed on Entrepreneurship (the Entrepreneurship Experience). Students will learn to understand what entrepreneurship is all about, particularly in a foreign environment. The course will be relevant to students no matter whether they wish to start up their own business, work for a small entrepreneurial firm or for a larger corporation where there is always a need to find new markets and commercialise new products. The entrepreneurial process is important to not-for-profit organisations, government, and, of course, commercial ventures.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code TECHCOMM 3050
    Course ECIC Study Tour ? The Entrepreneurial Experience
    Coordinating Unit Entrepreneurship, Commercialisation & Innov Centre
    Term Trimester 3
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact 32
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange N
    Assumed Knowledge 1 Semester of successful undergraduate study
    Course Description This course is an intensive overseas study tour, with up to 80 contact hours expected. The Study Tour will involve visiting an overseas location for approximately two weeks, and will involve academic seminars, group work, industry and government visits and cultural activities. This course is focussed on Entrepreneurship (the Entrepreneurship Experience). Students will learn to understand what entrepreneurship is all about, particularly in a foreign environment. The course will be relevant to students no matter whether they wish to start up their own business, work for a small entrepreneurial firm or for a larger corporation where there is always a need to find new markets and commercialise new products. The entrepreneurial process is important to not-for-profit organisations, government, and, of course, commercial ventures.
    Course Staff
    Name: Dr Allan O'Connor

    Short Bio:
    Dr Allan O’Connor is the postgraduate Academic Director for Innovation and Entrepreneurship at the Entrepreneurship, Commercialisation and Innovation. Allan combines his extensive experience in confronting the growth issues of small and medium enterprises and business start-up to inform and guide his teaching and research. Entrepreneurship and innovation have many  components and Allan's main teaching interests are in the assessment of business opportunities, entrepreneurial strategy and developing research skills. Since 2012 he has co-authored the leading Asia Pacific text, 'Entrepreneurship: Theory, Process and Practice', with Professors Howard Frederick and Donald Kuratko.

    His research examines the intersection between entrepreneurship, innovation and socioeconomic development which has led to the development of the Australian Cluster Observatory and an in-depth study of entrepreneurial ecosystems. His growing portfolio of research publications in international peer reviewed journals is  testament to the significance of Allan’s research agenda to his research field. In application, his research is designed to inform policy-makers, regional development agencies and the practicing entrepreneur with respect to creating and managing the resources  necessary to foster and develop innovation and entrepreneurship in response to the strategic challenges of economic change.

    Email: allan.oconnor@adelaide.edu.au
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    Tour departure:
    Thursday 17th September 2015

    Tour return:
    Friday 2nd October 2015
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    Additional Information for JAPAN:

    This is a 15 day intensive study tour to Tokyo, Hiroshima and Kyoto to provide students insight into the Japanese and  entrepreneurial culture and characteristics. With a focus on the entrepreneurial ecosystem, students will be exposed to the complexities and challenges of entrepreneurship and innovation in the Japanese context. The tour will include a series of lectures
    featuring prominent Japanese guest speakers providing a local context. Tours will be scheduled to both start-up and large corporations to gain a perspective on how innovation and entrepreneurship varies by the nature of its context. Students will have the opportunity to explore entrepreneurship with a diverse range of entrepreneurial stakeholders from student peers, university
    professors, progressive entrepreneurs, industry innovation managers and government sponsors of entrepreneurship and innovation. The key learning is to identify how each actor in an entrepreneurial ecosystem play's an important role in building social and economic dynamism that is characteristic of entrepreneurial communities.

    Examples of Field Trip and Industry Visit

    •      Entrepreneurial firms, Universities and Government Agencies
    •      Industry eg Mazda Innovation and Technology Development
    •      Cultural and Tourist Experiences e.g. Sumo wrestling, Kinkakuji Temple, Peace Museum and many more.

    This course is designed as a tour of discovery. We leave Australia with no particular agreed expectations about Japan as an entrepreneurial ecosystem but aware of its significance as a world economy. During the tour we will discuss what an  entrepreneurial ecosystem is and explore the various aspects of it through a series of lectures, discussions, meetings and site visits. As the tour progresses we will build a view of an entrepreneurial ecosystem and how it is characterised in Japan.

    Learning Outcomes
    By the end of this course students will:
    1.    Experience a culture, rich in tradition and convention to identify the driving forces for an the entrepreneurial ecosystem.

    2.    Gain an understanding of the entrepreneurial process and the importance of place for new venture start-up and growth.

    3.    Identify how an entrepreneurial ecosystem specifically supports the establishment and growth of new ventures.

    4.    Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of the main components of an entrepreneurial ecosystem and how Japan differs to western styled entrepreneurial ecosystems.

    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1, 3, 4 & 5
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 3, 4 & 5
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 4
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 2 & 3
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 2
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 3 & 4
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 4 & 5
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    The University’s preferred textbook supplier is Unibooks: http://www.unibooks.com.au/

    Required Readings:
    Audretsch, D., 2015. Everything in its Place: Entrepreneurship and the Strategic Management of Cities, Regions and States, Oxford University Press, New York, USA. Available at Amazon.com.au (Kindle Version as at 1/09/2015 $18.40)

    Hwang, VW & Horowitt, G 2012, The Rainforest – The Secret to Building the Next Silicon Valley, Regenwald, California. Available at Amazon.com.au (Kindle version as at 01/09/2015 $8.41)

    O’Connor, A. & Reed, G. 2015 South Australia’s Entrepreneurial Ecosystem: Voice of the Customer Research Report. Preparation and delivery for Department of State Development, South Australian Government. University of Adelaide, Australia. Available at:
    http://ecic.adelaide.edu.au/docs/ecosystem-research-project-13-08-2015.pdf (Free)


    Library Resource Readings
    Bryson, J.M., 2004, ‘What to do When Stakeholders Matter: Stakeholder Identification and Analysis Techniques’, Public Management Review, 6(1), 21–53

    Fuerlinger, G., Fandl, U., & Funke, T. 2015, The role of the state in the entrepreneurship ecosystem: insights from Germany, Triple Helix, 2(3), 2-26.

    Gilbert, C., 2003, ‘Disruptive Innovation’, Sloan Management Review, Summer edition, p. 27.

    Singer, S., Amorós, J.E., & Moska, D., 2015. Global Entrepreneurship Monitor: 2014 Global Report, Global Entrepreneurship Monitor, Available at:  http://www.gemconsortium.org/report/49079.

    Isenberg, D 2010, ‘How to Start an Entrepreneurial Revolution’, Harvard Business Review, June 2010, p. 41.

    MIT Technology Review (Eds) (2014), 10 Breakthrough Technologies 2014. Available at: http://www.technologyreview.com/lists/technologies/2014/.

    O’Connor, A. 2013, ‘A Conceptual Framework for Entrepreneurship Education Policy: Meeting Government and Economic Purposes, Journal of Business Venturing, Vol. 28, pp. 546-563.

    OECD, 2015 OECD Economic Survey of Japan available at:
    www.oecd.org/eco/surveys/economic-survey-japan.htm.

    Zahra, S.A. & Nambisan, S., 2012, ‘Entrepreneurship and strategic thinking in business ecosystems’, Business Horizons, 55, 219-229.


    Additional Reading for Insights in Adelaide’s Innovation System

    Roos, G. & O’Connor, A. (2015) Integrating Innovation through Entrepreneurship and Intellectual Capital Strategies and Systems: South Australian Perspectives, University of Adelaide Press, Adelaide, Australia. Available at:
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/press/titles/integrating-innovation/ (eBook Free)
    Recommended Resources
    Library Resources
    The University of Adelaide’s Barr Smith Library provides a range of learning resources including texts, journals, periodicals, magazines, and access to online databases and information services. It also offers a virtual library which is accessible via the University’s website. The University Library web page is: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/library/
    From this link, you are able to access the Library's electronic resources.
    Online Learning
    MyUni is the University of Adelaide's online learning environment. It is used to support traditional face-to-face lectures, tutorials and workshops at the University. MyUni provides access to various features including announcements, course materials, discussion boards and assessments for each online course of study (see: https://myuni.adelaide.edu.au)
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course is offered in blended learning mode with the face-to-face component offered as intensives.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    As a guide, a 3 unit course comprises a total of 156 hours work (this includes face-to-face contact, any online components, and self-directed study).
    Learning Activities Summary
    This is a draft schedule and session dates are a guide only. The timetable may be changed during the course delivery if necessary.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Session Date  Topic Readings/Activities
    PD see MyUni Pre-Departure
    Background
    OECD Economic Survey of Japan
    GEM 2014 Global Report
    Isenberg (2010)
    1 see MyUni Entrepreneurial Ecosystems: An Overview Hwang & Horowitt, (2012) Ch 1.
    Audretsch (2015) Chs 1 & 2
    O’Connor & Reed (2015)
    2 see MyUni The Factors and Resources of Entrepreneurial Ecosystems Audretsch (2015) Ch 3
    3 see MyUni Opportunity Spotting: A Practical Exercise in Ecosystem Alertness Hwang & Horowitt, (2012) Ch 2.
    Zahra & Nambisan (2012)
    4 see MyUni Industry Dynamics Audretsch (2015) Ch 4
    Gilbert (2003)
    5 see MyUni Stakeholder Perspectives and Objectives Bryson (2004)
    Hwang & Horowitt, (2012) Ch 3
    Audretsch (2015) Ch 5
    6 see MyUni Government’s Role in an Entrepreneurial Ecosystem Audretsch (2015) Ch 6
    O’Connor (2013)
    Fuerlinger, Fandl, & Funke, (2015)
    7 see MyUni Management of Technology MIT Technology Review (2014)
    8 see MyUni Availability of Finance Hwang & Horowitt, (2012) Ch 7
    9 see MyUni Developing Entrepreneurship Audretsch (2015) Ch 7
    Hwang & Horowitt, (2012) Chs 4 (Pts 1&2), 5 & 

    WD see MyUni Wrap-up and de-brief Discussion Over Dinner
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    An overview of the course assessment appears in the following Table. Details appear in the following section:
     Assessment No. Form of Assessment/ Collaborative Task Length (in word count) Weighting Due Date Learning Outcome
    1 Facebook Contribution
    (Individual Assignment)
    Min 150 words per post and three posts (no maximum applies)
    10% Duration of tour 1 & 2
    2 Opportunity Context Analysis
    (Team Assignment)
    2000 words 30% see MyUni 2 & 3
    3 Contrasting Ecosystems 3500 words 60% see MyUni 2 & 5
    Total 100%
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Students must complete all course assessment requirements.

    Course results are subject to moderation by the ECIC Board of Examiners
    Assessment Detail
    Assessment 1: Facebook Contribution 
    Weighting: 10%
    Due Date: Duration of Tour
    Submission Details: Blogs are to be posted to: https://www.facebook.com/ecicstudytour


    Task:
    Across the study tour you are required to contribute posts to the ECIC Facebook Study Tour site (link above). These posts are to share, not only your experiences of the Study Tour but also the positive attributes of Japan that you can identify as possibly contributing to the development of Japan’s entrepreneurial ecosystem. No negative comments please, we do not wish to offend our host country, but suggestions on how the particular attribute you identify can or could be beneficial is the objective. The site will be moderated and any inappropriate posts will be promptly removed.

    The more posts you make and the more insight you offer on positive aspects the better your grade for this assignment. The best posts will be adopted for the Formal ECIC Blog on the study tour.

    Scope:
    This assignment will assess your understanding of the course topics 1 through 9 (as you select).

    Length and Presentation:
    Presentation will be in the form of a minimum of three posts of 150 words each.

    Criteria by which your assignment will be marked:
    The posts should reflect academic standards worthy of a University of Adelaide student. The assignment will be assessed on the basis of:
    • Presentation and clear language;
    • Identification of a positive attribute for Japan’s entrepreneurial ecosystem,
    • Clear reasoning for why the attribute is or could be beneficial to Japan’s entrepreneurial ecosystem;

    Learning objectives with this assessment (refer to section 2.1): 1 and 2

    Assessment 2: Opportunity Context Analysis 
    Weighting: 30%
    Due Date: see MyUni
    Submission Details: Online through MyUni.

    Task:
    Session 3 will involve Opportunity Spotting, like a treasure hunt if you like. In the morning we will meet and discuss opportunity spotting and creativity techniques before we spend the day in teams looking for idea stimuli. By late afternoon of that day your team, of no more than 4, will meet and select an opportunity to use for this team assignment. The objective is to identify a potential business (either social or commercial) that has been inspired by your Japanese experience. Your perceived business opportunity will be presented and discussed over dinner that night.

    The task for this assignment is to assume you will start this business venture in a country of your choice. Over the period of the study tour we will be considering different aspects of the entrepreneurial ecosystem. Using this knowledge, your team is to prepare a report that considers how your chosen business opportunity will be influenced by the various aspects of the entrepreneurial ecosystem in your chosen country of start-up. This is not about assessing whether the business opportunity is a good idea or not but rather it is about assessing whether and how the ecosystem may support or de-stabilise the business opportunity. A better report will also address the how obstacles in the entrepreneurial ecosystem could be overcome.

    During the de-brief dinner on the 30th September a synopsis of your Team’s Opportunity Context Analysis will be presented and discussed for informal feedback.

    Scope: This assignment will assess your understanding of the session topics 2 through 8.

    Length and Presentation:
    Presentation will be in report format. The minimum length will be 2,000 words plus references and appendices as deemed necessary. Maximum word count will be 125% of the minimum.

    Criteria by which your assignment will be marked:
    • The extent of coverage of the aspects that characterise an entrepreneurial ecosystem
    • The level of detail provided that demonstrates understanding of how an entrepreneurial ecosystem may influence a new business venture start-up.
    • Evidence of critical thinking about the issues and concepts.
    • Logical flow, structure and sequence of presenting your findings.
    • Overall presentation including clarity of expression, good use of language, correct grammar, spelling, punctuation and referencing.

    Learning objectives with this assessment (refer to section 2.1): 2 and 3


    Assessment 3: Contrasting Ecosystems 
    Weighting: 60%
    Due Date: see MyUni
    Submission Details: Online through MyUni

    Task:
    This assessment item is an individual assignment that focuses explicitly and holistically on the entrepreneurial ecosystem topic. Using the material provided in this course and other references that you may source on your own, you are required to:
     Briefly describe the various aspects of an entrepreneurial ecosystem.
     Describe how your own experience throughout the study tour has provided insight into these various aspects of the Japanese entrepreneurial ecosystem
     Provide your own research to describe Adelaide’s entrepreneurial ecosystem as a western example
     Compare your findings of the two ecosystems to contrast the strengths, weaknesses of each ecosystem.
     Choose one primary aspect for development of each ecosystem and justify why development of this aspect would be beneficial to improving the overall entrepreneurial ecosystem in each respective place

    Scope:
    This assignment will assess your understanding of the session topics 2 to 9.

    Length and Presentation:
    Presentation will be in a report format. The minimum length will be 3,500 words plus references and appendices as deemed necessary. Maximum word count will be 125% of the minimum.

    The assignment will need to demonstrate appropriate use of references using preferably the APA Referencing System. Guidelines can be found under the heading ‘Referencing Style Guides and Academic Writing’ at http://libguides.adelaide.edu.au/.

    Criteria by which your assignment will be marked:
    The report will be judged on its structure, presentation, content, integration and synthesis of course materials.

    The standards by which the assignment will be assessed include:
    • The extent of coverage of the aspects that characterise an entrepreneurial ecosystem
    • The depth of reflection on your study tour experience with respect to the Japanese entrepreneurial ecosystem.
    • The range of research conducted to support your observations and arguments
    • Evidence of critical analysis of the issues and concepts.
    • Overall presentation including, clarity of expression and good use of language, correct grammar, spelling, punctuation and referencing, logical structure and sequence of presenting your findings.

    Learning objectives with this assessment (refer to section 2.1): 2 and 5

    Submission
    All text based assignments must be submitted via MyUni.
    Please refer to step by step instructions: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/myuni/tutorials/files/AssignmentStudentSubmission.pdf

    There are a few points to note about the submission of assignments:

    Assignment Submission: Assignments should not be emailed to the instructor but should be lodged via the MyUni Course site. Note that assignments may be processed via TURNITIN which is an online plagiarism prevention tool.

    Cover Sheet: Please submit, separate to your assignment, the completed University of Adelaide Assessment Cover Sheet providing details of yourself and your team members (if applicable), your assignment, the course, date submitted, etc. as well as the declaration signed by you that this is your (your team’s) work. Note that the declaration on any electronically submitted assignment will be deemed to have the same authority as a signed declaration.

    Backup Copy of Assignments: You are advised to keep a copy of your assignments in case the submitted copy goes missing. Please ensure that all assignment pages are numbered. If your assignment contains confidential information, you should discuss any concerns with the Course Lecturer prior to submission.

    Extensions of Time: Any request for an extension of time for the submission of an assignment should be made well before the due date of the assignment to the Course Lecturer. Normally, extensions will only be granted for a maximum of two weeks from the original assignment submission date. Extensions will only be granted in cases of genuine extenuating circumstances and proof, such as a doctor’s certificate, may be required.

    Failure to submit: Failure to submit an assignment on time or by the agreed extension deadline may result in penalties and may incur a fail grade. Note that a late penalty of 5% of the total available marks for that assessment item will be incurred each day an assignment is handed in late. Assignments handed in after 14 days from the due submission date will fail even if a 100% mark is granted for the work.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

    Resubmission & Remarking
    Resubmission of an assignment for remarking after reworking it to obtain a better mark will not normally be accepted. Approval for resubmission will only be granted on medical or compassionate grounds.

    Gifts and Tokens of Appreciation
    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the University has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment.

    Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their Supervisor/Manager, who will refer them for action under the University's student disciplinary procedures.
  • Student Feedback

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    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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