GEOG 7015 - Introduction to Urbanisation

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2020

Urban population accounts for 55% of total world population in 2018. This figure is projected to reach 68% by 2050. Migration has been a significant driver of urbanisation. Urbanisation is one of the most profound demographic and social processes facing the world today. In addition social, demographic and environmental challenges posed by climate change (or environmental change as defined broadly) are expected to have significant ramifications in the urbanisation process through impacting on urban sustainability, human security, institutional and infrastructural integrity, urban economic activities, livelihoods and liveability. These are important issues that need conceptual rethinking and policy interventions. As places where demographic, economic, social and environmental concerns are closely intertwined within the urban systems, cities are hotspots for an integrated approach to development.. This course provides an overview of the key concepts of urbanisation and methods for unravelling the urbanisation processes. It analyses major causal factors influencing urban growth and change in cities in both developed and developing countries. It examines the policy interventions used by governments to better manage population flows and increase adaptive capacities of diverse urban populations to socio-economic and environmental stresses of urban development, including housing, healthcare, social exclusion, utilities and land-use change. It investigates how urban planning influences the development pathways of cities and living outcomes of different groups of the urban inhabitants. It addresses important concepts and notions in urban studies, including demographic transition, population mobility, social inequality, social justice, urban citizenship, green urbanisation, and sustainability, and draws on case studies from Australia and other countries, including developing countries

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code GEOG 7015
    Course Introduction to Urbanisation
    Coordinating Unit Geography, Environment and Population
    Term Semester 1
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week.
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange
    Prerequisites Completed degree (72 units)
    Incompatible GEOG 5093
    Course Description Urban population accounts for 55% of total world population in 2018. This figure is projected to reach 68% by 2050. Migration has been a significant driver of urbanisation. Urbanisation is one of the most profound demographic and social processes facing the world today. In addition social, demographic and environmental challenges posed by climate change (or environmental change as defined broadly) are expected to have significant ramifications in the urbanisation process through impacting on urban sustainability, human security, institutional and infrastructural integrity, urban economic activities, livelihoods and liveability. These are important issues that need conceptual rethinking and policy interventions. As places where demographic, economic, social and environmental concerns are closely intertwined within the urban systems, cities are hotspots for an integrated approach to development.. This course provides an overview of the key concepts of urbanisation and methods for unravelling the urbanisation processes. It analyses major causal factors influencing urban growth and change in cities in both developed and developing countries. It examines the policy interventions used by governments to better manage population flows and increase adaptive capacities of diverse urban populations to socio-economic and environmental stresses of urban development, including housing, healthcare, social exclusion, utilities and land-use change. It investigates how urban planning influences the development pathways of cities and living outcomes of different groups of the urban inhabitants. It addresses important concepts and notions in urban studies, including demographic transition, population mobility, social inequality, social justice, urban citizenship, green urbanisation, and sustainability, and draws on case studies from Australia and other countries, including developing countries
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Associate Professor Yan Tan


    Course Coordinator

    A/Prof. Yan Tan

    Office:  G32, Napier (Napier ground floor)

    Ph: 08 8313 3976

    Email: yan.tan@adelaide.edu.au



    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.


    The course consists of a three hour seminar each week.


    Seminars

     
    Tuesdays 12noon – 3pm, Ingkarni Wardli B17

    NOTE: Seminars start in Week 1

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    1.    Critically analyse urbanisation processes and their contribution to economic growth and human wellbeing;

    2.    Develop an understanding of cities and the role of urban processes in shaping population distribution, economic restructuring, and society;

    3.    Understand how and why different forms of urbanisation in developed and developing countries have developed, and their implications for population distribution, economy, society and environment;

    4.    Develop conceptual thinking on the complex interactions between climate (environmental) risks, urbanisation and human mobility;

    5.    Critically analyse the relationship between urban planning, property development and urban growth;

    6.    Communicate both orally and in written form the key aspects of urbanisation processes.

    7.    Familiarise major sources of literature and data/information on urbanisation studies.




    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1-7
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1,3,4,5
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    2, 6
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    1-7
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    1-6
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    1-6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources

    ·    There is no required textbook for this course.

    ·    All the required readings (plus additional readings), which include a suite of articles on the subject, will be made available through
    MyUni/Canvas.

    ·    All other required material (e.g. lecture slides, assessment information, web links) is also provided on MyUni/Canvas.

    Recommended Resources
    The following lists of journals and books are far from being comprehensive but provide some helpful reference points. The list of journals and books is inalphabetical order, not in any order of importance or relevance:

    Journals


    Climate Change and Sustainability
    Environment and Planning journals (A, B, C, D)
    Habitat International
    Planning Theory and Practice
    Regional Studies
    Regional Studies, Regional Science
    Urban Studies

     
    ONLINE books in the library

    Beall J, Fox S. 2009. Cities and Development (Routledge Perspectives on Development). Routledge, London.
    Birch EL, Wachter SM (eds.). 2011. Global Urbanization. University of Pennsylvania Press.
    Henderson JV,  Thisse JF (eds.). 2004. Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics (Vol. 4, Cities and Geography). Elsevier, North-Holland.
    Horn P, d'Alencon PA, Cardoso ACD (eds.). 2018. Emerging Urban Spaces: A Planetary Perspective. Springer.
    Jonas AEG, Mccann E, Thomas M. 2013. Urban Geography: A Critical Introduction. Chicester: John Wiley & Sons.
    Paul K, McCarthy LM. 2012. Urbanization: An Introduction to Urban Geography (Third Edition). Prentice Hall.

    Online Learning
    MyUni/Canvas is a critical learning tool and means of communication and knowledge exchange in this course. Learning materials are
    available for each week in preparation for our workshop. Other course material (e.g. readings, assessment information) and many features of MyUni/Canvas (e.g. announcements and the discussion board) will help students to organise and manage their study.

    Students need to regularly check the MyUni/Canvas website, and use MyUni/Canvas for the different assignments (for information and submission).

    To reach the MyUni website for the course follow the links fromthe University of Adelaide's Homepage http://www.adelaide.edu.au or go
    straight to https://myuni.adelaide.edu.au/. You will need to enter your username and password to enter the MyUni website. If you
    have difficulty accessing MyUni contact the Help Desk at 830 33335 or send an e-mail to myuni.help@adelaide.edu.au (See http://www.adelaide.edu.au/myuni; http://www.adelaide.edu.au/its/help/contact_details/).

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The teaching in this course is based on student-centred learning principles and strategies. Students are seen as partners in the learning journey. The course employs a blended approach to teaching and learning: face-to-face interactions in class are supplemented by effective use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) and the online teaching and learning environment of MyUni/Canvas. Students have material and learning activities on MyUni/Canvas which need to be done before the workshops so that the workshops can be very active and participatory. The interactive and collaborative teaching and learning thus takes place inside and outside the classroom. Students learn problem-solving skills and work collaboratively in workshops.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The times suggested here are guidelines for students to achieve the course requirements and to successfully complete the course. You will need to allocate appropriate time for your study (contact and non-contact time). University policies suggest for a 3-unit course that there
    should be a minimum workload of 156 hours of learning activities in the semester:

    ·      Structured learning/contact time (lectures/workshops): 3 hours per week
    ·      Reading and preparation: 4 hours per week
    ·      Preparation for assignments: 3 hours per week
    ·      MyUni/Canvas: 3 hours per week

    Learning Activities Summary
    Week 1 Urbanisation and global demographic transition: Key concepts and trends
    Week 2 lobal megacities: patterns, causes, and challenges
    Week 3 Migration and urbanisation in China
    Week 4 Key theories of urbanisation
    Week 5 Inequality and urban citizenship
    Week 6 The nexus of urbanisation and ageing populations
    Week 7 Urban green spaces for health and wellbeing
    Week 8 Planning for climate risk: Green urbanisation
    Week 9 Housing: Issues and policy interventions 
    Week 10 Australia’s housing affordability crisis;
    The theory behind housing policy interventions
    Week 11 Urban future
    Week 12 Student presentations
    Specific Course Requirements
    None

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    1. Seminar Participation: 10%

    2. Reflective Seminar Journal :  30%

    3. Research Essay: How to understand the nexus between urbanisation and migration? 30%

    4. Research/Case Study Report: 40%







    Assessment Related Requirements
    To be able to pass the course you must complete and submit for assessment all assessment requirements described in the course profile.

    The Harvard (author-date) referencing system must be used for the written assignments. Your work needs to include references.

    Assessment Detail
    1. Seminar participation (10%)

    Seminars are the forum in which we discuss the subject matter and have group work exercises to consolidate the knowledge. Seminar attendance is a compulsory component of the course, and is monitored during the course. You are requested to notify the course convenor as soon as possible if you have to miss a seminar. You need written evidence (e.g. medical certificate; note from employer; counsellor’s letter) if you have to miss more than one.  You are required to attend at least 90% of the seminars. You are assessed on your participation in the class discussions and the small group exercises. Students are expected to be well prepared for each seminar and to actively participate.

     
    2. Research / Case Study Report: Climate (environmental) risk and urban adaptation in a city of your choice

    Highlights:

    ·         Students are required to complete a Research/Case Study Report and presentation on a topic cantered around climate (environmental) risk and urban adaptation in a city of your choice.
    ·          Report is 30% of your grade and due: Sunday, 16 June 2019.
    ·          The notional word limit of your Report is set at 3000 words.
    ·          Presentations are 10% and will be given on Tuesday, 4 June 2019.
     
    The ability to communicate ideas in writing is an essential part of working life for most university graduates. The steps involved in writing a report require students to find and analyse data, present key findings, identify and critically engage with other people’s ideas, draw out implications from the findings of data analysis, generate an informed point of view or argument and convey that viewpoint in a clear, systematic and rigorous manner. The following guide provides advice on the process and technical requirements of writing a report and
    developing sound written communication skills.

    Overall considerations

    ·        Text double spacing
    ·        12 point font (choose font that is easy to read)
    ·        Page numbers
    ·        Referencefollowing appropriate referencing conventions

    Report Structure

    ·        Introduction
    o  Should clearly introduce what your research question is.
    o  Provide some background on the topic – what is the importance of it.
    o  Outline any relevant background information that will help the reader understand the basis for your case study.
    o   How does the issue look at fit into wider discussions in the literature, media, government, etc.
    o  Outline the structure of your report – what will you be discussing.
     
    ·        Presentation of Results of Research:
     
    o  Only include results that are key to the research question
    o  Consider how you will present your data/information – tables, graphs, maps. But make sure you reference to them if you have included them.
    o  Results need to be clear and concise – is what you have included important.
    o  Organise results in a logical manner
     
    ·        Discussion/ policy implications

    o  Relate your results to the concept or question you are discussing
    o  How do your results support or disprove what you have found in the literature, why might this be?
    o  Think about how your results can be used to inform policy-making or discuss other research that could be done based on what you have found.
    o  Think about what impact your results may have at a municipal, regional, state or national level.

    ·       Conclusion

    o  Sum up what you have discussed, ensure that your conclusion discusses what you have talked about in your report, should be able to reflect your introduction
    o  Keep it brief: maximum 2 paragraphs
    o  Don’t bring in any new information

     
    Presentation of research findings 

    Students are required to give a presentation of their preliminary findings of their Case Study Report to students in the usual seminar
    setting. 

    The presentation is for about 5 minutes, followed by 1-minute question time.

    All students must attend the presentations.

    Presentation should:

    o  Provide an understanding of the background and significance of the research being presented
    o  What are the key and/or interesting results you have found?
    o  What do the results you have found tell us about climate (environmental) impacts and adaption challenges and practices in the chosen city?
    o  Be presented in a clear and logical sequence

     
    3.    Reflective Seminar Journal (2,500 words) (30%)

    Students are required to do the required readings for the seminar and write a short critical review of ONE required reading (300-350
    words for each entry) for weeks 1-8 (8 seminars).The critical review of the reading should include:

    ·   A brief summary of the article and the main points of argument;
    ·   Critical reflection and comment on the reading and its argument.

    You need to write timely entry into your electronic journal on MyUni/Canvas each week. This means that you submit your journal entry
    through Turnitin and complete your entry by the end of the relevant week (Sunday midnight).

    Each weekly entry should include:

    1)    Critical review of ONE (1) of the required reading (300-350 words) (25%)
    2)    Critical reflection of seminar and what you have learned (100-150 words): what did we do; what did you learn; what worked for you in the seminar or not? (5%)

     
    4. Essay: How to understand the nexus between urbanisation and migration?
     
    Highlights:

    ·      Due date: Friday midnight, 29 March 2019
    ·      The Essay is worth 20% of the Final Assessment for the course.
    ·      The notional word limit is set at 2000 words.

    Students are required to complete a Research Essay on the topic of reviewing the nexus between urbanisation and migration. In order to do a sound literature review you are expected to reference at least 10 literature sources (journal articles, books). The suggested readings for each week can be used as a starting point but you need to go beyond these. Marking will place an emphasis on quality of argument more than quantity. The preferred referencing system is Harvard (the author-date in text matched with bibliography).

    In assessing the essay credit will be given to students who have read widely, are able to critically assess the reading in terms of the set topic and who are able to support arguments with case studies and, where appropriate as evidence, such as graphs and frameworks. 
     



    Submission

    All assignments should be submitted electronically via MyUni/Canvas. To check for plagiarism we use TURNITIN. Last possible time for submission is always midnight on the due date.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

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