CLAS 1106 - Introduction to Ancient Greek and Roman Literature

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2022

This course provides an introduction to many of the great texts and significant literary genres that arose from the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome. It will explore the origins and development of genres and writing styles that are key to understanding the values and complexities of these two influential civilizations; these may include epic love poetry, dramatic tragedy and comedy, satire, historical, biographical and philosophical writing. Important works by the major authors of antiquity - such as Homer, Sophocles and Virgil - will be studied, either in part or whole and students will learn the skills necessary for the technique called 'close reading'. The course will teach students how to place texts within their historical and cultural contexts and will enable them to appreciate the influence that such texts had upon the subsequent literature of the Western world. No knowledge of Latin or ancient Greek is required; all texts will be studied in English translations.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code CLAS 1106
    Course Introduction to Ancient Greek and Roman Literature
    Coordinating Unit Classics
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Course Description This course provides an introduction to many of the great texts and significant literary genres that arose from the cultures of ancient Greece and Rome. It will explore the origins and development of genres and writing styles that are key to understanding the values and complexities of these two influential civilizations; these may include epic love poetry, dramatic tragedy and comedy, satire, historical, biographical and philosophical writing. Important works by the major authors of antiquity - such as Homer, Sophocles and Virgil - will be studied, either in part or whole and students will learn the skills necessary for the technique called 'close reading'. The course will teach students how to place texts within their historical and cultural contexts and will enable them to appreciate the influence that such texts had upon the subsequent literature of the Western world. No knowledge of Latin or ancient Greek is required; all texts will be studied in English translations.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Jacqueline Clarke

    For other Classics staff who contribute to the teaching of this course, please see the relevant section of MyUni for this course.
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    1. Confidently engage in close reading of ancient texts across a variety of genres and writing styles.




    2. Display knowledge and understanding of the historical and cultural contexts in which such texts arose and the circumstances which gave rise to them.




    3. Demonstrate appreciation of the influence that genres and writing styles which arose from the civilizations of Ancient Greece and Rome exercised upon the subsequent literature of the Western world.




    4. Demonstrate knowledge of methods of citation of ancient texts and scholarly issues in dealing with them.




    5. Deliver coherently and logically argued written material with a scholarly approach.

     






    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)

    Attribute 1: Deep discipline knowledge and intellectual breadth

    Graduates have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of their subject area, the ability to engage with different traditions of thought, and the ability to apply their knowledge in practice including in multi-disciplinary or multi-professional contexts.

    1, 2, 3, 4

    Attribute 2: Creative and critical thinking, and problem solving

    Graduates are effective problems-solvers, able to apply critical, creative and evidence-based thinking to conceive innovative responses to future challenges.

    1, 4, 5

    Attribute 3: Teamwork and communication skills

    Graduates convey ideas and information effectively to a range of audiences for a variety of purposes and contribute in a positive and collaborative manner to achieving common goals.

    1, 5

    Attribute 5: Intercultural and ethical competency

    Graduates are responsible and effective global citizens whose personal values and practices are consistent with their roles as responsible members of society.

    1, 2, 3
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    All resources, including translations of texts and text excerpts will be available via MyUni.
    Recommended Resources


    Rutherford, R., 2007. Classical Literature A Concise History, Chichester: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


    Storey, I.C. & Allan, Arlene, 2005. A Guide to Ancient Greek Drama., Malden, MA: Blackwell.


    Both these texts are available as ebooks through the Barr Smith library.

    Online Learning
    Powerpoints and recordings from the lectures will be placed up on MyUni after each lecture has been delivered. 

    Students are expected to consult the announcements board at least twice a week and must closely read all emails sent via MyUni.

    The readings for each tutorial topic will be placed upon MyUni or directions will be supplied about how to access them.

    Guidelines to formatting footnotes and bibliography are placed upon MyUni. Students are expected to read and consult these.

    Students will submit assignments to MyUni and they will be marked online.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    No information currently available.

    Workload

    No information currently available.

    Learning Activities Summary

    No information currently available.

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary

    No information currently available.

    Assessment Detail

    No information currently available.

    Submission

    No information currently available.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.