SOCI 3018 - Sociology of Ethnic Conflict

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2020

Ethnic conflict is a major social force of our times. Ethnic conflict has led to the creation of inclusive, multicultural democracies and to the liberation of colonized peoples, but it has also been associated with prejudice, discrimination against minorities, massive human rights abuses, ethnic cleansing, and genocide. The course will introduce you to this powerful social force that is shaping our lives, society, and world history. The success of the course will depend on your preparedness to enter the critical debates and to share your experiences and creative insights with your colleagues and the instructor. We will use sociological theories and research to tackle some of the major current debates and controversies related to ethnic and racial tensions, such as the legacy of tragic treatment of Australia's Indigenous peoples, the opposition to Australian multiculturalism, the resurgence of the Far Right, prevention of Islamic terrorism, and genocide.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code SOCI 3018
    Course Sociology of Ethnic Conflict
    Coordinating Unit Gender Studies and Social Analysis
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 6 units of Level II undergraduate study
    Course Description Ethnic conflict is a major social force of our times. Ethnic conflict has led to the creation of inclusive, multicultural democracies and to the liberation of colonized peoples, but it has also been associated with prejudice, discrimination against minorities, massive human rights abuses, ethnic cleansing, and genocide. The course will introduce you to this powerful social force that is shaping our lives, society, and world history. The success of the course will depend on your preparedness to enter the critical debates and to share your experiences and creative insights with your colleagues and the instructor. We will use sociological theories and research to tackle some of the major current debates and controversies related to ethnic and racial tensions, such as the legacy of tragic treatment of Australia's Indigenous peoples, the opposition to Australian multiculturalism, the resurgence of the Far Right, prevention of Islamic terrorism, and genocide.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Djordje Stefanovic

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:
    1. Understand and apply major sociological theories of ethnic conflict
    2. Understand and apply major sociological methods for the study of ethnic conflicts
    3. Productively engage in team presentations and team discussions
    4. Use library research skills, integrated literature review, and writing skills to produce a quality academic paper
    5. Analyse constructive feedback on early versions of their work to improve the quality of their writing and to produce a paper they can use as an example of their work. 




    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1,2
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1,2,3,4,5
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    3,5
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    3,4,5,
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    1,2
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    3,5
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    A set of required readings and presentation readings will be accessible via myuni.

    Online Learning
    Lecture power point slides, Echo 360 lecture recordings, on-line quizzes, assignment instructions, and model assignments will be posted  to the MyUNi course site available via MyUni link.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    No information currently available.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    WORKLOAD                                                                        TOTAL HOURS

    1 X 2 hour lectures per week                                                20 hours
    1 X 1 hour team presentations per week                             10 hours
    2 hours reading per week                                                    20 hours
    1.5 hours on-line quiz answering per week                         15 hours
    6 hours assignment preparation per week                          60 hours
    1.1 hours team presentation preparation per week            11 hours
    2 hours Midterm Exam / Final Exam review per week          20 hours

    TOTAL                                                                               156 hours per semester





    Learning Activities Summary
    1. An Invitation to the Study of Ethnic Conflict
    2. Theory and Method in the Study of Ethnic Conflicts 
    3. Historical Roots of Ethnic Conflicts
    4. Constructing Ethnic / Racial Identities and Boundaries 
    5. Immigration
    6. Far Right and Islamophobia
    7. Contact vs. Competition Hypotheses
    8. A Global Clash of Civilizations?
    9. Decolonization
    10. Ethnic Cleansing and Genocide




  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    ASSESSMENT TASK                                                   TASK TYPE                WEIGHTING              COURSE LEARNING OUTCOME(S)

    Class Activities                                                Formative & summative          10%                                   1,2,3
    Team Presentation                                          Formative & summative           5%                                    1,2,3
    Mid Term Exam                                                Formative & summative         10%                                    1,2
    Outline (500-600 words)                                Formative & summative           5%                                     1,2,4
    Draft (2,000-2,300 words)                             Formative & summative          15%                                    1,2,4,5
    Final Term Paper (2,800-3,200 words)           Formative & summative         30%                                     1,2,4,5
    Final Exam                                                     Summative                              25%                                     1,2




    Assessment Detail
    Class Activities (10%): The students are expected to take part in in-class team exercises and to participate in
    tutorial discussions.

    Mid Term Exam (10%): The mid-term will be multiple choice and will include the kinds of questions asked in the
    quizzes.

    Team Presentation (5%): Presentations on the case studies aim to sharpen students' presentation skills, as well as the
    ability to critically assess the implications of theories studied on issues of public concern. Each student is responsible for participating in one presentation team. Length of presentation will be not more than 20 minutes per team. Each team is expected to use the specified reading and other related course materials (plus any other sources you find relevant), and to
    argue for the given side in the debate. You can think of it as one side being the “Prosecution” and the other side being the “Defence,” but with both sides making sociological instead of legal arguments. Two presentations will be followed by an informed and mutually respectful class discussion on the topic. Only the students who are presenting are required to read the presentation
    readings (and only their own presentation reading), but everyone is expected to take notes during the presentations, as the presentation material might appear on the mid term and the final exam. Unless otherwise specified, presentations will take place during the tutorial class of the week they are scheduled. A student can write the term paper on the same topic on which they
    did the presentation. The papers need to be individual and that they will need to be considerably more comprehensive than the presentations.

    Outline (500-600 words) (5%): A one-page outline of the term paper will specify the topic, research question, and pattern of
    development of the term paper. The term paper should involve application of theoretical materials discussed in the course to a case study (of student's choice) of ethnic conflict. The outline will contain a page with 8 references  proposed to use for the term paper. The outline will not need be comprehensive, but it will need to show that the student has done some thinking and preliminary library research on a topic of interest

    Draft (2,000-2,300 words) (15%): An eight page (double-spaced, Times New Roman font 12, 2.54 cm margins on all sides, end of text references not included) draft of the term paper is required. The draft must be spell-checked and as cohesive as possible. The draft should provide a theoretically informed and empirically grounded solution to a puzzle relevant to the case study chosen. The feedback that the student receives on this work should enable them to do a good job on the final paper

    Final Term Paper (2,800-3,200 words) (30%): The final term paper, based on the Draft paper and the feedback received, will be no more than 12 pages (double-spaced, Times New Roman font 12, 2.54 cm margins on all sides, and end of text references not included). The ability to make a strong argument in a limited space is critically important

    Final Exam (25%): The students will be expected to display understanding, integration, and critical reflection on the required readings and lectures. The examination will have a multiple choice format and it will be held at the end of semester.





    Submission

    No information currently available.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
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