ORT&TRAU 2106 - Fundamentals of Biomechanics and Human Movement

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2023

The course will consist of study in applied biomechanical aspects related to sport and human movement. In summary, this course provides an opportunity to define the biomechanical mechanisms involved in human movement. The course will provide knowledge of: planes and axes of motion, linear and angular kinematics and kinetics of motion, Newton's laws of motion, conservation of momentum and impulse-momentum relationships, centre of gravity, balance and stability, mechanical work, power and energy, fluid dynamics, friction, leverage and materials; sports injuries; measurement techniques, qualitative and quantitative analysis.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code ORT&TRAU 2106
    Course Fundamentals of Biomechanics and Human Movement
    Coordinating Unit Medical Sciences
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 9 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites MEDIC ST 1000B or ANAT SC 1102 (and at least 15 units of other Level I courses)
    Restrictions Not available to students who have completed HLTH SC 2101
    Course Description The course will consist of study in applied biomechanical aspects related to sport and human movement. In summary, this course provides an opportunity to define the biomechanical mechanisms involved in human movement. The course will provide knowledge of: planes and axes of motion, linear and angular kinematics and kinetics of motion, Newton's laws of motion, conservation of momentum and impulse-momentum relationships, centre of gravity, balance and stability, mechanical work, power and energy, fluid dynamics, friction, leverage and materials; sports injuries; measurement techniques, qualitative and quantitative analysis.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Associate Professor Dominic Thewlis

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 Define and use concepts and terminology within the area of biomechanics
    2 Explain how biomechanical factors influence motion in sport and exercise
    3 Show knowledge of statics, kinematics and kinetics
    4 Analyse and evaluate movements and techniques for training and sports from a biomechanical perspective
    5 Identify changes of movement patterns and techniques for increasing or decreasing the load on human tissues
    6 Determine the effect of force on human structures while performing basic movements, such as gait, running and jumping
    University Graduate Attributes

    No information currently available.

  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    There are no required textbooks for this course. The material covered has been collated from a number of resources including peer-reviewed scientific literature.
    Recommended Resources
    E books (available via university library website)
    Jim Richards (ed) The comprehensive textbook of clinical biomechanics, 2018
    Roger Bartlett (ed) Introduction to Sports Biomechanics, 2007
    Journals (available online for University students)
    Journal of Biomechanics
    Gait & Posture
    Medicine & Science in Sport & Exercise
    American Journal of Sports Medicine
    British Journal of Sports Medicine
    Journal of Applied Biomechanics
    Clinical Biomechanics



    Online Learning
    The majority of material (excluding E-Books) will be available through MyUni. The course delivers its material though a series of weekly videos covering key theory content. This is reinforced through face-to-face classes. MyUni is used as the primary mode of communication, so it's imperative that students check-in regularly.

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The course is delivered through a combination of online lectures (broken down into short sections), workshops and practical classes. The workshop classes are designed to reinforce the theory content covered in the online lectures, however, it is critical that students come prepared having reviewed the theory content prior to the workshop. Knowledge of theory content will be assessed at the end of each workshop through a short quiz. We will have up to six practical classes throughout the semester. These are designed to provide students with first-hand experience of working with key biomechanical tools and data management.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The standard undergraduate and postgraduate coursework workload for a full-time student is 48 hours per week which equates to 12 hours
    per 3-unit course. Fundamentals of Biomechanics and Human Movement is a 3-unit course, so there is an expectation that students will, on average, spend 12 hours per week working on course related activities. A typical week could be broken down as follows: (1) 2 hours of online theory content; (2) 2 hour workshop; (3) 2 hour practical; (4) 4 hours of assessment-related activities; and (5) 2 hours of reading and  additional study to reinforce learning.



    Learning Activities Summary
    Students will cover the following. Assessments are scheduled to align with the theory and practical content of the course.


    Week

    Module

    Topic

    1

    Introduction
    Intro to terminology used in biomechanics

    2

    Neuromuscular control of Human Movement
    Muscle contraction, muscle force,
    and muscle actions

    3

    Measuring muscle activity

    4

    Kinematics of Human Movement
    Movement of the human body in space

    5

    Movement of joints of the human body

    6

    Motion of a body in space and through fluids

    7

    Forces acting outside of the body
    Gravity and its effect on the human body

    8

    Ground reaction forces

    9

    Forces acting inside the body
    Generating forces to move objects

    10

    Muscle forces to move limbs

    11

    Applications of measurements and principles
    Stress, strain and elasticity

    12

    Applied examples of biomechanics in action
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary

    Assessment Task Type of Assessment % of Total Assessment Weighting Hurdle Course Learning Outcome(s) being assessed
    Mid-semester test  Summative 10% 1,2,3
    Laboratory Report Summative 30% 2,3,4,6
    Group video presentation Summative 25% 1,2,4
    11 weekly quizzes Summative 10% 1,2,3,4,5,6
    Written exam Summative 25% 1,2,3,5,6
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Weekly quizzes
    These will open at the end of the weekly workshop class, therefore, attendance is a requirement. Students will have 15 minutes set aside
    in class time to take each quiz.

    Laboratory report
    Activities in the practical classes are directly linked tothis assessment item.

    Assessment Detail
    Written Test (10%)
    The test will be scheduled online for week five of the semester. This will be an open book online quiz which can be taken any time in the pre-allocated window. The test will be a mixture of multiple choice and short answer questions. The content assessed will be taken from weeks 1-4.


    Laboratory Report (30%)
    This report (1500 words total) will be based on an experiment run in a practical class. The assessed laboratory practical classes will take place in Week 6 with support for processing and interpretation of the data in week 7. The report will need to be submitted by Week 9.


    Group Video Presentations (25%)
    In groups of between two and four people, students are required to prepare a 10-minute video summarising a recent paper from a conference in the field of biomechanics. Students will be provided with a wide range of papers to select. The aim of this presentation is to articulate complex scientific terms in ways the general public can understand. The video will be due in week 12.


    11 weekly quizzes (10%)
    Weekly quizzes will provide an ongoing assessment of students’ knowledge and understanding. These short (~5 questions) quizzes will
    take place at the end of each workshop class (week 1-11). The sum of all quizzes is equal to 10% for the course. The quizzes will be taken online.


    Written Examination (25%)
    This will be a closed book written examination that is conducted in the University examination week. The examination will contain a range of written questions (mixture of short answer and long answer questions). The examination will be based upon the concepts and theory learned in the course (this includes lectures, workshops, and practical classes). The examination mark will contribute 25% to the final mark for this course.X
    Submission

    Assessment

    Week due

    Submission mode

    Feedback timeframe

    Group submission

    Written Test

    5
    MyUni
    1 week
    N

    Laboratory Report

    9
    MyUni
    2 weeks
    N

    Group Video Presentations

    12
    MyUni
    2 weeks
    Y

    11 weekly quizzes

    Weekly
    MyUni
    1 day
    N

    Written Examination

    Exam period
    In-person
    on request
    N

    Extensions for Assessment Tasks
    Submission dates may be extended under exceptional circumstances. Please see the course coordinator at the earliest opportunity if you feel that you require an extension. Upon receipt of an application for extension, staff may:- Refuse permission for extension, specifying the appropriate reason(s); or- Grant permission for extension without penalty; or- Grant permission for extension with a penalty as guided by this polic
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
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