Skip to content

2018 Program

2018 Program
Download PDF

Welcome From

PhilProfessor Philippa Levy
Pro Vice-Chancellor (Student Learning)

Welcome to the 2018 Festival of Learning and Teaching!

The theme for the eighth Festival of Learning and Teaching is What Works? Perspectives on Feedback and Assessment.
Globally, the landscape of higher education teaching and learning is changing rapidly with wider participation, a focus on student outcomes and major digital disruptions, yet to be fully realised.

It has been argued that assessment and feedback might be the ‘final frontier’ in transforming higher education learning and teaching – that our assessment and feedback practices have been surprisingly resistant to changing with the changed environment. This year’s Festival will focus on new and innovative ways to do assessment and feedback and share experiences of what works in practice and what the evidence nationally and internationally tells us.

We will explore a wide range of perspectives, including:

  • Assessment and feedback for large classes and MOOCs
  • Peer and self-assessment
  • Adaptive assessment
  • Authentic assessment
  • Feedback and assessment for work integrated learning
  • Technology enhanced feedback and assessment
  • Student-led approaches to feedback and assessment

The Festival is an opportunity to celebrate our experiences as both teachers and learners at the University of Adelaide, to showcase innovations, to share evidence, ideas and practical tips, and to debate issues and challenges. I wish all participants an inspiring, motivating and enjoyable day.

Program of Events

  • Thursday 19 July: Pre-Festival Workshops

    This year there will be 2 workshops, held on Thursday 19 July. Both workshops have limited capacity. Please note that registrations have now closed.

    Workshop 1: Half-day Hackathon: Reimagining online assessment (9.00 – 12.00pm)

    Join our very first assessment hackathon session and co-design solutions to some of the niggling challenges of assessment design, and impactful feedback. Dee Halil and Ali Ogilvie of AdelaideX will be your hackathon guides.

    • What is a hackathon? A hackathon brings together diverse skills to co-design creative solutions to defined problems.
    • Who is a hackathon for? It's for academics, students and professional staff - all of us in the University ecosystem - each of us stakeholders in student success and academic integrity. You don't need to be techy, or have a specific idea, you just need to be open and ready to collaborate in short, sharp, design cycles.
    • What will you be doing? You'll work in a team to design an online assessment aligned to a specific assessment type (defined on the day). You'll brainstorm ideas, prototype solutions by sketching out the student experience, test your assumptions, and present why your design is better than what is currently being implemented. By applying a futures lens to your design process, you won’t be limited by what is possible right now, only by your imagination and the underlying purpose of the assessment.
    • Will there be snacks? Yes. An essential component of a successful hackathon is healthy snacks to keep your energy high, and your ideas flowing.

    Kick off the 2018 FoLT with this high-energy creative workshop!

    Workshop 2: Feedback in Action - sharing practice from across disciplines (2.00 – 4.30pm)

    Effective feedback is more than telling a student what they can (or can't) do. In  order to fully benefit from feedback, students must recognise their level of performance, but also be given the guidance and information to make improvement and progress. In this workshop, three members of the Adelaide Education Academy, Beth Loveys, Joy McEntee and Cathy Snelling, will share their approaches to feedback within their own disciplines. They will present the key principles that underpin all forms of feedback, and demonstrate how they apply them in their diverse educational settings of laboratory practicals, written work and clinical placements.

    • What will this session do? This session  you with will present a range of evidence-based approaches to assessment and feedback, and then provide a number of exemplars of practice from across disciplines at the University of Adelaide
    • Who is this session for? Anyone involved in designing and implementing assessment and providing feedback in a range of formats, will benefit from attending this session. Early career teachers will benefit from ideas and strategies to incorporate into their practice, whilst more experienced educators will have the chance to reflect on and evaluate their current approaches to assessment and feedback.
    • What will you be doing? You will hear about evidence-based best practice approaches to assessment and feedback from across the University of Adelaide - in different contexts ranging from written assignments in the Humanities to laboratory practicals in Science and clinical placements in Health Science. You will then be given the opportunity to consider how you would apply what you have learnt in a range of authentic case studies, where you will also give and receive peer feedback.
    • Theoretical framework: Authentic Assessment Toolbox http://jfmueller.faculty.noctrl.edu/toolbox
      Boud, D., & Molloy, E. (2013). Rethinking models of feedback for learning: the challenge of design. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 38(6), 698-712. https://doi.org/10.1080/02602938.2012.691462
    • Will there be snacks? Yes. An essential component of a successful session is healthy snacks to keep your energy high, and your ideas flowing.
  • Friday 20 July: Festival of Learning and Teaching
    Program of Events - Festival of Learning and Teaching 2018
    Time Mins Session
    8.30am 30 Registration opens
    Ingkarni Wardli Atrium
    9.00am 5 Welcome and opening remarks
    Professor Philippa Levy, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Student Learning)
    Horace Lamb Lecture Theatre
    9.05am 5 Welcome to Country
    Uncle Rodney O’Brien, Elder
    Horace Lamb Lecture Theatre
    9.10am 55 Keynote: Making the most of feedback design in the classroom and the workplace
    Professor Elizabeth Molloy, Melbourne Medical School, The University of Melbourne
    Horace Lamb Lecture Theatre
    10.05am 30 Morning Tea
    Ingkarni Wardli Atrium
    Oral Presentations
    Room 1
    Room 2051, level 2 Barr Smith South
    Room 2
    Room 2060, level 2 Barr Smith South
    Room 3
    G06, Engineering and Mathematical Sciences
    Room 4
    G07, Engineering and Mathematical Sciences
    Technology Student Perspectives Work Integrated Learning Practice Based Learning
    10.35am 30 Echo360: assessment, feedback and metacognition in large classes
    Joy McEntee
    From a student to a team, from a teacher to a mentor: blurring the boundaries
    Graham Heinson
    Student and Teacher Perspectives on Assessment and Feedback in Work-Integrated Learning: the Practice - Research Nexus
    Cornelia Koch
    Encouraging students’ reflective practice in Economics writing using Online Rubrics and Peer-Review
    Mark Dodd
    11.05am 30 Let’s Chat! Guided Assessment, Feedback and Support Using Chatbots
    Mario Ricci
    Flexible and personalised assessment: lessons from students’ views and experiences
    Thomas Wanner
    10 Lessons for feedback and assessment: Industry and Student Partnership
    Melissa Connor
    Cultural dimensions of feedback at an Australian university: A study of international students with English as an additional language
    Julia Miller
    11.35am 30 Technology-Enabled Assessment and Feedback in a Large First-Year Law Class: Student and Staff Perspectives
    Matthew Stubbs
    Student perception of assessment choice in plant science
    Amanda Able
    Assessing Career Readiness Skills – The Case File approach in Criminal Law
    Kellie Toole
    Circles through Square Holes: Assessment and Feedback in a Diverse University Community (A DITCOP Comic)
    Laura Grenfell
    12.05pm   30 A Students as Partners approach to formative Assessment and Instant feedback using Digital Learning Communities
    Amy Rees
    Students’ perception of the effectiveness of feedback is not correlated with their learning outcomes
    David Saint
    Professional Practice
    Peter Hochs
    Retention not overload: lessons learned on the journey to implement open-book exams in level II biochemistry
    Beth Loveys
    12.35pm 45 Lunch and Booths – Ingkarni Wardli Atrium
    Mini Workshops
        Room 1
    Room 2051, level 2, Barr Smith South
    Room 2
    Room 2060, level 2, Barr Smith South
    1.20pm  45 Equipping students to give and receive feedback
    Janice Loftus
    10 things you are (almost certainly) already doing to develop student’s digital capabilities
    Rebecca Tooher
    Pecha Kuchas
        Room 1
    Horace Lamb Lecture Theatre
    Room 2
    Room 2060, level 2, Barr Smith South
    2.10pm  50

    • Pushing PowerPoint for Interactive Formative Assessment and Feedback, Kym Schutz
    • The National Exploration Undercover School: Learning from feedback not learning for assessment,
    Graham Heinson
    • Say this... Because... And?
    Hiromi Teramoto
    • Don’t be Boring’: A simple task for assessing teamwork, creativity and communication in law, Anna Olijnyk
    • Education for Inclusion: Student-led conference,
    Linda Westphalen

    Questions (time permitting)

    • Data (Management) by Design, Fiona Mariner
    • MapleTA for Large Classes, Carl Howard
    • Canvas ePortfolio,
    Andrew Cook
    • Rear view vision: 15 years of large class assessment and feedback strategies,
    Karin Barrovich

    Questions (time permitting)

    3.00pm 30 Afternoon Tea
    Pecha Kuchas
    3.30pm  50

    • Debates in Statistics, Andrew Viggo Metcalf
    • Reflection: Turning experience into learning in the Adelaide Graduate Award,
    Sharon Scott
    • Rapid fire peer generated feedback,
    Bernadette Foley
    • Simple and effective approaches to improving exam-based assessments, and how to teach students to adopt empirically validated exam revision strategies,
    Matthew Dry

    Questions (time permitting)

    • Feedback for Adaptive Leadership in the Adelaide MBA, Chad Habel
    • Can you meet me half-way: Assessment as a tool for concept development for international students,
    Catherine Nguyen-Hoang
    • From the virtual to the real: Assessment in VR,
    Isabella Flachsenberger Gower

    Questions (time permitting)

    4.20pm 5 Move to Plenary Session
    4.25pm 30 Plenary Session
    Professor Philippa Levy, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Student Learning)
    Professor Elizabeth Molloy, Melbourne Medical School, The University of Melbourne
    Horace Lamb Lecture Theatre
    4.55pm 5 Closing Remarks
    Professor Philippa Levy, Pro Vice-Chancellor (Student Learning)
    Horace Lamb Lecture Theatre
    5.00pm 60 Networking and Refreshments
    Barr Smith South, level 2, 2051
    6.00pm - Festival Concludes

Keynotes

Professor Elizabeth Molloy, Melbourne Medical School, The University of Melbourne

Elizabeth MolloyElizabeth Molloy is Professor of Work Integrated Learning in the Department of Medical Education, Melbourne Medical School. She was previously Director of the Health Professions Education and Educational Research Unit at Monash University (2011-2014). Elizabeth’s PhD (2006) at the University of Melbourne examined the role of the clinical educator in providing performance feedback to students. Elizabeth has published over 100 peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters and books, with an interest in workplace learning, feedback, assessment and professional development of clinical supervisors. Elizabeth is currently working on 2 Nationally funded grants (Office of Learning and Teaching) examining how feedback can be designed in the university and work-based setting.

Making the most of feedback design in the classroom and the workplace
Feedback is a challenging but important business in both classroom and workplace settings. Despite compelling evidence that it is important for learning, feedback is seen as one of the most problematic aspects of the learner’s experience. Learners report that they do not receive enough feedback, and when they do, it is difficult to use. Educators struggle with the pressure to provide personalised and individualised comments on learners’ work. Educators also anticipate the emotional impact of their feedback on learners, and can approach these encounters with a tentative stance that can reinforce the notion that feedback is a practice to be feared. Recent frameworks proposed by Boud and Molloy (2013) called Feedback Mark 1 and Mark 2 will be explored, as well as the empirically-derived Feedback for Learning Framework (feedbackforlearning.org).

Here, feedback is re-conceptualised as an activity driven by learners, rather than an act of ‘telling’ imposed on learners. Learners are encouraged to self-evaluate, and to help devise plans that will help them achieve the set learning goals. This approach challenges learning cultures with established feedback rituals resembling experts telling learners what is going wrong, with little planning for what comes next.

Lunch Time Booths

From 12:35pm - 1:20pm

Over the Festival lunch time there will be a number of booths present in the Ingkarni Wardli Atrium, including:

  • Digital Capabilities Framework
  • Student Success Services: Writing Centre, Maths Learning Centre, PASS
  • Employability
  • Learning Design and Analytics
  • Program Enhancement Partnership (PEP)
  • Student Life
  • University Library
  • Communities of Practice groups including:
    • Career Readinesss
    • Diversity and Inclusion in Teaching
    • Discovery Learning
    • eLearning
    • Flipped Classroom
    • Learning Analytics
    • Student Engagement
    • Virtual Reality

Abstracts

  • Presentations
    Principle Author Title
    Able, Amanda Student perception of assessment choice in plant science
    Connor, Melissa 10 Lessons for feedback and assessment: Industry and Student Partnership
    Dodd, Mark Encouraging students’ reflective practice in Economics writing using Online Rubrics and Peer-Review
    Grenfell, Laura ‘Circles through Square Holes: Assessment and Feedback in a Diverse University Community (A DITCOP Comic)’
    Heinson, Graham From a student to a team, from a teacher to a mentor: blurring the boundaries
    Hochs, Peter Professional practice
    Koch, Cornelia Student and Teacher Perspectives on Assessment and Feedback in Work-Integrated Learning: the Practice - Research Nexus
    Loveys, Beth Retention not overload: lessons learned on the journey to implement open-book exams in level ii biochemistry
    McEntee, Joy Echo360: assessment, feedback and metacognition in large classes
    Miller, Julia Cultural dimensions of feedback at an Australian university: A study of international students with English as an additional language
    Rees, Amy A Students as Partners approach to formative Assessment and Instant feedback using Digital Learning Communities
    Ricci, Mario Let’s Chat! Guided Assessment, Feedback and Support Using Chatbots
    Saint, David Students’ perception of the effectiveness of feedback is not correlated with their learning outcomes
    Stubbs, Matthew Technology-Enabled Assessment and Feedback in a Large First-Year Law Class: Student and Staff Perspectives
    Toole, Kellie Assessing Career Readiness Skills – The Case File approach in Criminal Law
    Wanner, Thomas Flexible and personalised assessment: lessons from students’ views and experiences

    Student perception of assessment choice in plant science

    Principle Presenter: Able, Amanda, Faculty of Sciences
    Co-Presenter: Dr Beth Loveys, Agriculture Food & Wine, Faculty of Sciences
    Abstract: Academics aim for authentic assessment tasks that allow students to demonstrate achievement of particular learning outcomes while students view assessment as the pathway to successfully completion. Students increasingly see themselves as “customers” and therefore expect to have greater input into how they are taught and assessed. Choice of assessment method can increase student engagement and develop greater self-awareness (O’Neill 2017, Irish Educational Studies 36: 221-236). However, students may also consider this to be an extra burden of responsibility unless they are provided with a “low risk” environment as well as clearly-explained assessment options and equitable, authentic assessment that enables them to perform to their strengths (O’Neill 2017). Interestingly, perception of ability to perform well using a particular assessment type is not always correlated with the actual learning outcome (Van de Watering et al. 2008, Higher Education 56: 645). However, there is limited literature about the impact of student choice in the sciences. This study therefore aimed to determine how choice of assessment type is viewed by students and if this empowerment provides motivation for increased engagement and performance. Students were given the choice of a consultancy report, poster or seminar to report on a small group research project in the core level II course Foundations in Plant Science.  Students (n=88) were surveyed using 5 point Likert scales and open-ended questions at week 4 and after assessment. The majority were very comfortable with the opportunity to choose assessment because it allowed them to play to their strengths. However, there were concerns about achieving an equitable workload. Interestingly, some groups chose an assessment option that would challenge them to learn a skill that they felt needed improvement (e.g. oral communication). After completion of the assessment, the majority of students would still choose the same task because ‘it best represented what we did’.

    10 Lessons for feedback and assessment: Industry and Student Partnership

    Principle Presenter: Connor, Melissa, Faculty of the Professions
    Co-Presenters: Christopher Davis, Faculty of the Professions; Nikolas Baric, Student; Rhiannon Harmer, Student; Oscar Richardson, Student
    Abstract: Teaching Work Integrated Learning courses means often being confronted with the issue of not only how to assess tasks largely conducted in the workplace but also how to provide feedback that is meaningful to students. Using principles of authentic assessment, the Industry Project was designed to replicate workplace tasks, and just as importantly, include replication of workplace standards by featuring communication, teamwork and problem-solving skills (Villarroel et al, 2017).
    In February 2018 three students travelled to Nauiyu, an Indigenous community approximately four hours from Darwin to work on projects in collaboration with the Miriam Rose Foundation. The students self-selected into the course, all were in their final year in the disciplines of Commerce and Economics in the Faculty of the Professions. Internships are well-established in the faculty; however this course differed by partnering with a not-for-profit organisation on project work to assist the Foundation to meet their goal of diversifying their revenue stream. While supported by academic staff members, the students were largely responsible for practising authentic workplace tasks such as; defining the project in negotiation with stakeholders, communicating with stakeholders and each other, refining the project brief and presenting their ideas. Assessment was delivered in a ‘student as partners’ model in dialogue between the course coordinator and students. While there were often times of ambiguity, this approach was largely appreciated by the students and the focus on experiential learning had the positive outcome in preparing students for the world of work (Bridgstock, 2017). In this presentation students and staff will provide 10 lessons gained through this process to inform the design and delivery of authentic assessment and feedback in Work Integrated Learning courses.
    References
    Ashford-Rowe, K., Herrington, J., Brown, C. (2013) Establishing the Critical Elements That Determine Authentic Assessment. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education 39:2, 205-222
    Bridgstock, R. (2017) The University and the Knowledge Network: A New Educational Model for Twenty-first Century Learning and Employability. Tomlinson, M, Holmes, L (Eds), Graduate Employability in Context. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Jackson, D. (2015) Employability skill development in work-integrated learning: barriers and best practice. Studies in Higher Education 40(2) 350
    Villarroel, V. Bloxham, S., Bruna, D., Bruna, C., Herrera-Seda, C. (2017) Authentic Assessment: Creating a Blueprint for Course Design. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education 43:5, 840-854

    Encouraging students’ reflective practice in Economics writing using Online Rubrics and Peer-Review

    Principle Presenter: Dodd, Mark, Faculty of the Professions
    Abstract: The ability to communicate economic concepts is an important professional skill for students of Economics. The postgraduate course ECON7200 Economic Principles (M) has for several years incorporated weekly written assignments. Many students were having difficulty with improving their writing, and understanding the expectations, so an effort was made to improve the communicated expectations, and to encourage students to reflect more deeply on how they could improve their own assignments. To this end, in Semester 1, 2018, online grading rubrics were implemented within the Canvas LMS, and students were given the option to peer review one other student’s work on the same rubric that they are graded on by a tutor. In addition to the valuable additional feedback received from peers, one important benefit of this process was intended to be the reflection that would be encouraged in students when they reviewed another student’s paper which was on the same task that they had attempted themselves.

    This initiative was evaluated using several different methodologies, both qualitative and quantitative in nature. SELT data was analysed for trends and compared to prior offerings of the course that lacked this initiative. A separate informal online survey that asked for more specific student feedback and commentary on this initiative was undertaken to elicit students own views on how they benefited from this process. The official grades from the assignments were also compared to the peer review grades, and to the grades of the assignments in previous semesters. This presentation will not only provide evidence with regard to the students’ learning and reflective practice, but also consider evidence of some secondary benefits such as the time and effort required of graders, and the consistency of graders’ assessments.

    ‘Circles through Square Holes: Assessment and Feedback in a Diverse University Community (A DITCOP Comic)’

    Principle Presenter: Grenfell, Laura, Faculty of the Professions
    Co-Presenters: Claudia Szabo, Faculty of Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences; Aaron Humphrey Faculty of Arts; Kim Barbour, Faculty of Arts
    Abstract: How do we address student diversity in the classroom when setting assessment? How can students be involved in setting assessment? How can we give feedback that recognises and responds to student diversity?
    The University’s Diversity and Inclusion in Teaching Community of Practice (DITCOP) has a membership of about 20 staff from all five Faculties as well as Student Support and Learning Design. Together we have developed an Inclusive Teaching Framework featuring five pillars: course structure, delivery, assessment, feedback and review. We presented the first iteration of this Framework at the 2017 Festival of Learning and we have since been designing innovative ways to engage the wider University with our proposed framework.
    At the July 2018 Festival of Learning and Teaching we will launch “‘Circles through Square Holes’: Assessment and Feedback in a Diverse University Community” an innovative comics-style “graphic guide” that uses humour, metaphor and visual communication to address two of the five pillars of our Framework - Assessment and Feedback. We will discuss how grappling with the challenges of addressing student diversity in the classroom led to the creation of this comic, and present some of our ideas, informed by our draft Inclusive Teaching Framework, for diversity and inclusion when it comes to setting assessment and giving feedback.

    From a student to a team, from a teacher to a mentor: blurring the boundaries

    Principle Presenter: Heinson, Graham, Faculty of Sciences
    Co-Presenters: Jianan Chen, Larissa Collins, Ben Kay, Kiryeong Lee, Racheal Mahlknecht , Sarah McDonald, Angus Nixon, Mike Reiger, Teagan Romyn, Melissa Stinear
    Abstract: The Frank Arnott Award was a global geophysical challenge to develop new visualization techniques to large and complex data sets from multiple sources. In 2016-17, I invited a group of students to participate. Ten students from all year levels, diverse ages, and different academic backgrounds and life experiences formed a team.  In October 2017, at a major international conference in Toronto, the University of Adelaide students won the award in the category of best international student team.

    As a group, we have reflected on why the Frank Arnott Award worked so well, and how these learnings can be transferred to future teaching. The key conclusion is that many of the core skills developed in this project are not routinely part of undergraduate courses, but which are in high demand from employers.

    1. The team learnt to appreciate the value of creativity, with no penalty for failure. No formal assessment was a great benefit and mirrors real-world problem solving. In conventional teaching, students will trade creativity and risk for certainty to achieve the best possible mark, but when decoupled from an assessment framework there was much more scope to try out ideas.
    2. Rather than content-based geoscience skills, the team had to learn transformative scientific skills outside their normal experience.
    3. In terms of real-world project management skills, the team had to come to terms with problems that have no clear-cut outcomes.
    4. Communications skills were key to the team dynamic.
    5. The sense of the unknown and excitement of discovery was a major incentive.
    6. Finally, students saw this was a genuine industry problem.  They networked with a wide range of professionals and saw the context of their project.

    Professional practice

    Principle Presenter: Hochs, Peter, Faculty of Engineering, Computer, and Mathematical Sciences
    Abstract: Many of our undergraduate programs include courses that help students get ready for the job market. A challenge in setting up and delivering such a course is that the expertise needed is not necessarily part of every academic's toolkit. Another challenge is how to assess if students gained the concrete practical skills we aim to teach them, rather than a theoretical awareness of them. In mathematics and computer science, we have recently set up a course of this type from scratch, called Professional Practice. In developing this course, our guiding principle was that all components had to be based on real world experience, and demonstrably relevant to our students' careers. This course was delivered for the first time in the first semester of this year. In this presentation, I will discuss how we developed this course, how we teach students relevant skills, and what assessment methods we use. The presentation will include feedback from students and how it will help us improve the course in future years. While this is a case study presentation about a single course, it is about skills we aim to teach all students across the University. So our learning points from this course are hopefully relevant to similar courses in all our programs.

    Student and Teacher Perspectives on Assessment and Feedback in Work-Integrated Learning: the Practice - Research Nexus

    Principle Presenter: Koch, Cornelia, Faculty of the Professions
    Co-Presenters:Sarah Kapadia, Faculty of the Professions, Student; Jake Kriticos, Faculty of the Professions, Student; Laura Grenfell, Faculty of the Professions
    Abstract: The University of Adelaide’s Strategic Plan boasts that our graduates will be ‘ready for graduate employment’, as the University will embed ‘strategies that … produce in our graduates the core skills and attributes employers want’. Such strategies include opportunities for students to develop employability skills through work-integrated learning (WIL) (ACEN et al, 2015).

    The Strategic Plan also emphasizes the need to ‘return research to undergraduate teaching, so that [students] … come to experience the scholarship of discovery as the highlight of their learning experience’. One aspect of this return is inquiry-based learning, where students engage in the discovery of new knowledge under expert supervision (Levy et al, 2010; Healey, 2005).

    At first glance, one would expect that WIL courses may increase students’ employability skills, but not involve them in high-quality research. However, our experience running legal internship courses for 15 years shows that interns can develop employability skills while also engaging in high-quality research. The assessment scheme in our internship electives requires students to critically reflect on matters which their host institution is grappling with. This includes reflective diary entries as well as a longer research essay under academic supervision on topics of practical import to the internship host. The students investigate practical and novel issues of their choosing and are empowered to engage in higher-level thinking. The essays produced are usually of high-quality, which is externally validated. Students have: won the Law Foundation of South Australia Essay Competition in 2012, 2016 and 2018; been selected to present at the annual BeaCUR and ACUR conferences; and had their essays published in law journals.

    Former internship students and course coordinators/designers will offer student and teacher perspectives on why a practical internship course is surprisingly well-suited to involve students in serious scholarly and analytical research.

    References
    Australian Collaborative Education Network, Universities Australia, Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Australian Industry Group and the Business Council of Australia, National Strategy on Work Integrated Learning in University Education (2015).
    Healey, M., Linking Research and Teaching: Exploring Disciplinary Spaces and the Role of Inquiry-based Learning, In Barnett, R. (Ed.) (2005). Reshaping the University: New Relationships between Research, Scholarship and Teaching. McGraw Hill. Open University Press, pp.67-78.
    Levy, P., et al. (2010). The Sheffield Companion to Inquiry-based Learning. The University of Sheffield.

    Retention not overload: lessons learned on the journey to implement open-book exams in level ii biochemistry

    Principle Presenter: Loveys, Beth, Faculty of Sciences
    Co-Presenter: Hayley McGrice, Faculty of Sciences; Chris Ford, Faculty of Sciences
    Abstract: Open book exams are not a new concept in terms of assessment methods in university courses. It has been argued that a conventional closed book examination merely tests the students’ ability to memorise and recall information while an open book exam encourages broader reading, creative approaches to study and a deeper understanding of content. As educators we hope that students undertaking our courses retain the core concepts to then build on them in future years of study or employment. This is often a challenge with complex and content-heavy courses such as biochemistry. Animal and Plant Biochemistry II is a core course for students enrolled in four diverse degree programs at the University of Adelaide (Bachelor of Agricultural Science, Animal Science, Applied Biology, Viticulture and Oenology and Vet Bio Science). Traditionally this course has been challenging to a large proportion of the cohort, resulting in an unacceptable percentage of students requiring additional summative assessments at the end of the semester. In an attempt to reduce student stress at exam time while increasing knowledge retention of the course content, and to decrease the number of students requiring an additional summative assessment, an open book examination format was introduced in 2017. Students were permitted to bring any notes created by them during the course, along with printed lecture slides and a maximum of 10 photocopied pages from text book or online sources. Emphasis was placed on understanding and applying knowledge rather than simply remembering. This presentation will include comparative quantitative analysis on exam performance data from previous closed book exams and the new open book format, and qualitative data gained from student surveys gauging their thoughts on the open book format. The lessons learned through the transition process from the closed book to the open book summative examination format will also be discussed.

    Echo360: assessment, feedback and metacognition in large classes

    Principle Presenter: McEntee, Joy, Faculty of Arts
    Abstract: Most teaching staff in the University know Echo360 as a lecture capture system, but there is more to it than that. It also contains a suite of tools for engaging students in classes – the Active Learning Platform (ALP). This includes integrated in-class polling, which can be used for real-time assessment and feedback in large classes. It has obvious applications in Sciences, but what is unusual about my situation is that I use it in the Humanities. I use Echo360 activities during class to stimulate conversation, to unearth and discuss multiple perspectives, and to identify and discuss preconceptions that may be barriers to learning. Echo360 activities are invaluable in helping me gauge student comprehension, and in helping students check their knowledge through self- and peer-assessment. And students have expressed their satisfaction, as this survey of a 2017 pilot demonstrates:
    • 89% have said it was useful to their learning
    • 72% said it increased their engagement in class
    In 2018, I have won an Echo360 Academic Champion’s Grant which involves me in a series of national workshops that are designed to enable me to bring insights from around the country and internationally back to the University of Adelaide to enrich the ways we teach with Echo360. During this presentation, I will be actively recruiting people to join me in the next stage of exploring the uses of Echo360, so if you are curious, please come along.

    Cultural dimensions of feedback at an Australian university: A study of international students with English as an additional language

    Principle Presenter: Miller, Julia, Faculty of Arts
    Co-Presenter: Richard Warner, Faculty of Arts
    Abstract: International students with English as an additional language (EAL) face transitional challenges when entering a new academic culture. One such challenge involves optimising feedback to help foster their academic development, bearing in mind that feedback is not a culturally neutral entity (Nazif, Biswas, & Hilbig, 2004-5). The current study of 134 postgraduate international students examines pre-course and in-course perceptions, experiences and expectations of feedback at university in Australia. Responses to questionnaires and in focus groups revealed that students’ previous feedback experiences had largely been summative, with an emphasis on error correction, but they expected to receive more feedback, particularly formative, throughout their courses. They also had concerns about understanding feedback, and about potentially negative remarks. These concerns were partially borne out by a follow-up survey (n=43) in which only 29% said they understood everything their lecturers said. Teachers giving feedback to international students may therefore need to consider the nature of their comments, their method of delivery and how their feedback feeds forward into student development. 
    Reference: Nazif, A., Biswas, D., & Hilbig, R. (2004-5). Towards an understanding of student perceptions of feedback. Carleton Papers in Applied Language Studies, 21/22, 166-192.

    A Students as Partners approach to formative Assessment and Instant feedback using Digital Learning Communities

    Principle Presenter: Rees, Amy, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
    Co-Presenter: Joshua Bilske, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, Student
    Abstract: Author List: Rees, Amy; Bilske, Joshua; Karanicolas, Sophie; Lottering, Nicolene.

    2018 ANATSC 2009 peer leaders aimed to transform the course digital strategy to create an inclusive student experience, accommodating learning preferences and social media integration to promote pedagogical innovation by changing interaction between students and teachers. This presentation demonstrates the success of Students as Partners in the post-class element of the Flipped Classroom Framework (Karanicolas and Snelling, 2017) and facets three to five of the Teaching with Technology Framework (Lottering, 2018), by reinventing revision approaches and digital assessment to achieve instant gratification and promote online learning.
    Deployment of a Pre-class survey students enrolled in second year Anatomy, designed using Pintrich’s (2002) self-regulation framework demonstrated that 83.2% of respondents (n=113) saw benefits from integrating social media technologies into their learning. Digital strategies employed by peer leaders included the use of Instagram for revision content and polling, and Canvas for co-created weekly practice quizzes. Interactivity and analytical reports provided by Instagram, Facebook and Canvas were accessed to inform study habits and engagement. Interestingly, 69% of the ANATSC2009 student cohort followed the Instagram private channel. Impression data demonstrates that more views were observed with stories involving student interaction (polls). Facebook page insights demonstrate 134 active members engaging in peer-collaboration. Activity was most prevalent on the day weekly peer-leader generated practice quizzes were released. LMS analytics demonstrates that each quiz featured 373 views and 117 participants, with those completing the practice quizzes each week scoring significantly higher on practical exams compared to those who omitted participation. These findings demonstrate increased student engagement and interaction witnessed in the digital learning environment, when post-class content is designed and facilitated by 3rd year peer leaders. The correlation in performance is evident through “the peer leader resources played a role in helping me get high marks because I was always revising the MSK content” (Post-Class Survey, 2018).

    Let’s Chat! Guided Assessment, Feedback and Support Using Chatbots

    Principle Presenter: Ricci, Mario, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
    Co-Presenter:Andrew Beatton, AdelaideX; John Murphy, Learning Enhancement and Innovation
    Abstract: The advent of AI-powered technology, including online chatbots, is reshaping many industries. In education, chatbots are being used in many ways including to streamline processes, engage more students, and provide feedback and support. It has even been suggested that educational chatbots as tutors could one day teach the most complex and subjective disciplines. At the University of Adelaide, two separate groups have been piloting the use of chatbot technology to mimic conversational interactions (student-expert, student-instructor) and provide automated feedback and support. This presentation will showcase both approaches and discuss potential opportunities for chatbot technology in education.

    Approach 1: Chatbot technology developed at Harvard University was integrated into the recently released ‘Sex and Human Reproduction’ MOOC. Specifically, for some students traditional MCQ tasks were replaced with conversational chatbot assessment, and A-B testing was utilised to test student outcomes and satisfaction. Preliminary qualitative and quantitative results of this pilot project will be discussed.

    Approach 2: An initial investigation was done by Learning Enhancement and Innovation into the potential of ‘Hubert’, a chatbot being developed in Sweden. Hubert engages with students in live text conversation to elicit qualitative feedback. The ‘Bot’ then uses machine learning to analyse and interpret conversations and provide a quantitative report back to the instructor. The results of this initial investigation will be discussed.

    Students’ perception of the effectiveness of feedback is not correlated with their learning outcomes

    Principle Presenter: Saint, David, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
    Co-Presenters: Dane Horton; Andrea Yool; Elizabeth Beckett
    Abstract: In course surveys, students often express dissatisfaction with the level of feedback.  One might envisage that students who felt dissatisfied with the level of feedback would perform more poorly in examinations. We conducted a study to evaluate the relationship between students' perceptions of adequate feedback and their final exam performance.  We hypothesised that students who were well satisfied with the level of feedback would perform better in their final course examinations. 

    Methods: Ethics approval for this project was obtained from the University of Adelaide.  All second year Physiology IIA students had the purpose of the project explained to them and were then asked to complete a customised SELT for the course, using a Likert Scale of 1 to 7.  Participation was voluntary. Student identities were anonymised and coded by an independent third party.  After the course, their final coded exam scores were analysed in relation to their individual SELT answers. 

    Results: 169 students participated in the survey (70 male, 99 female). For the question “I had sufficient opportunities to receive feedback during this course” Likert scores ranged from 1 to 7 (median = 5.0, mean 4.805, mode 5.0) with a normal distribution. There was no difference in scores between sexes. Final exam scores ranged from 23% to 95% (mean 63.5 ± 1.3%; no difference between sexes).  There was no correlation between the feedback question Likert score and the final exam score (linear regression: r=0.11, P=0.16) 

    Conclusion: The results indicate that student dissatisfaction with feedback does not affect their learning outcomes. We speculate that the information being provided to students throughout the course (in the form of progressive assessments, formative tests, in-class exams and annotated practical assignments) does  provide critical feedback on how they are tracking with their learning, but the students do not recognise this information as feedback.

    Technology-Enabled Assessment and Feedback in a Large First-Year Law Class: Student and Staff Perspectives

    Principle Presenter: Stubbs, Matthew, Faculty of the Professions
    Co-Presenters: Azaara Perakath, Faculty of the Professions, Student; Cornelia Koch, Faculty of the Professions
    Abstract: Assessment should engage students in a course and foster their learning through effective and timely feedback. In large cohorts, however, developing such assessment and providing meaningful feedback within resource constraints is a significant challenge (Boud and Molloy, 2013).

    In 2014, we redesigned Principles of Public Law (PPL), a first-year undergraduate course, compulsory for all 350-400 law students, to facilitate student engagement throughout the semester.

    We changed our lectures to fully flipped classroom. All information delivery was moved to high quality videos that students can watch at any time in preparation for the class. Assessment plays a vital role in facilitating our new pedagogy, because students can only benefit from these classes (which engage with higher-level analytical skills such as problem solving and critical thinking) if they come prepared with the foundational learning from the videos. Therefore, we designed assessment that motivates students to prepare, and provides them with timely feedback on their learning.

    Every week, students complete a compulsory online quiz before the class. This serves four purposes. First, it encourages student preparation: although each quiz is only worth 2.5% of a student’s overall grade, this has been enough to ensure near-universal preparation. Second, students receive timely feedback on their learning. Third, staff can use quiz results to tailor classroom activities to student needs. Fourth, because students arrive well prepared at class, and staff know the areas of weaker student understanding, class time is more productive.

    In this presentation, a former student and PASS leader and two academics will provide their perspectives on the technology-enhanced assessment and feedback used. Our data cover 2014-2017 and address student engagement with our online content and assessment, student satisfaction reported in SELTs and student success in our course. Using this data, we evaluate the impact of our approach, and explore avenues for further improvement.

    Assessing Career Readiness Skills – The Case File approach in Criminal Law

    Principle Presenter: Toole, Kellie, Faculty of the Professions
    Co-Presenter: David Plater, Faculty of the Professions
    Abstract: In 2018, Criminal Law was restructured to include and enhance career readiness skills to enable law graduates to compete more effectively in a competitive employment market.
    Career readiness skills have been integrated by:
    - Prosecution and defence lawyers attending seminars and lectures to advise students on options for employment in criminal law, securing employment and managing professionally and psychologically in the difficult environment of criminal and legal practice;
    - Seminars being structured around two simulated case files that progressively raise issues as they would unfold in a real-world criminal case. Students assessed the liability of their ‘clients’ each week, using replicas of witness statements, autopsy reports, records of interview, statements, bail agreements, and medical and psychological reports, which raise legal questions and social issues such as domestic violence and mental health issues that underpin many crimes. Students made strategic decisions on the progress of the case, such as whether to plead guilty, proceed to trial, negotiate with police or claim mental impairment.
    - The interim assessment was based on one of the case files, and required students to take the role of a junior lawyer and research the defence of involuntariness, advise a managing partner on the nature of the relevant law and the viability of the defence for the client given the available evidence, and provide written advice to the client explaining, in concise terms, the relevant law and her practical options.

    The combination of the career readiness strategies means graduates seeking legal employment can provide evidence to employers that can identify legal issues from case files; understand and apply the criminal law in a realistic practical context; formulate case strategies from a prosecution or defence perspective; discuss issues and options with clients; advise supervising lawyers; write in clear terms and negotiate and advocate on behalf of clients.

    Flexible and personalised assessment: lessons from students’ views and experiences

    Principle Presenter: Wanner, Thomas, Faculty of Arts
    Co-Presenter: Edward Palmer, Faculty of Arts
    Abstract: Flexible delivery and learning for students in higher education has been a strong trend in recent years at the University of Adelaide and globally. True flexibility in student learning means that there needs to be a move away from the traditional model of assessment where the lecturer/teacher decides when and how students are to be assessed. This leads to more personalised learning through flexible content, delivery and assessment (Gordon 2014, p. 10). Personalising education and learning means that the “learner is central” in that the needs, interests, backgrounds and l earning styles of individuals are placed at the centre, and students are more empowered through more “choice and voice” in their learning (Keamy et al., 2007 , p. 2)

    In this presentation, we will first discuss how we have implemented flexible and personalised assessment in three different courses using Canvas. We will also report on the preliminary findings of a two year study about flexible and personalised learning where students had the chance to set their own submission date and weightings (within limits) of their assignments; and had input on how they would like to receive feedback (e.g. personal consult; audio/video; written feedback). Students overall made intelligent decisions about their assessment weightings and due dates for submissions; they did not automatically choose the last possible date but made decisions based on their desire to achieve early feedback and assessment requirements in other courses. Overall students saw the benefits of flexible assessment and valued the opportunity to influence their assessment and learning outcomes.
    The presentation will include key lessons for other teachers to make their assessment practices more flexible and include students as partners in the assessment process.

    References
    Gordon, N. (2014).  Flexible Pedagogies: technology - enhanced learning. UK: The Higher Education Academy. 
    Keamy, K., Nicholas, H., Mahar, S., & Herrick, C. (2007).  Personalising education: From research to policy and practice. Melbourne: Office for Education Policy and Innovation, Department of Education.

  • Workshops
    Presenter Title
    Loftus, Janice Equipping students to give and receive feedback
    Tooher, Rebecca 10 things you are (almost certainly) already doing to develop student’s digital capabilities

    Equipping students to give and receive feedback

    Principle Presenter: Loftus, Janice, Faculty of the Professions
    Abstract: The objective of the mini-workshop is to demonstrate an initiative employed in a third-year accounting course to help students to provide and use feedback. Participants will have the opportunity to obtain first-hand experience of the learning activity. The workshop activity is modified so that no knowledge of accounting is required.
    The workshop will be interactive with participants working in groups of two or three. In the first stage of the activity, participants will be given a question and asked to draft a short response. In the second stage, the workshop leader will provide guidance and each participant should use this feedback to review and revise his or her response as applicable. In the third stage, participants exchange drafts. The workshop leader provides guidance and advice on how to provide constructive feedback. Participants then provide written feedback to each other, followed by the opportunity to discuss the feedback with each other.
    The workshop will conclude with a discussion in which participants will be encouraged to reflect on the experience and provide feedback to the workshop leader. It is hoped that this session will stimulate discussion on how the initiative might be extended or improved. Further, the discussion might consider how the initiative might be adapted to other learning contexts and modes of delivery.

    10 things you are (almost certainly) already doing to develop student’s digital capabilities

    Principle Presenter: Tooher, Rebecca, Division of Academic and Student Engagement
    Co-Presenter: Hari Nikas, Division of Academic and Student Engagement
    Abstract: This workshop will explore digital capabilities with support of digital innovation in the classroom. The Digital Capabilities Framework provides a comprehensive guide to the skills, knowledge and behaviour that we and our students need to develop for “success in the fast moving digital environment for learning, research and professional activity”.
    However, this can seem a bit overwhelming when we consider all of the capabilities and associated behavioural elements/indicators. In this workshop we will discuss ways in which we are already providing opportunities for student to develop their digital credentials. We will argue that relatively minor changes in design, delivery, and assessment of learning can enable students to recognise and enhance their digital capabilities. Also at the same time, educators develop their own digital capabilities and learn through co-creation with their students and colleagues.
    In small groups participants will:

    • evaluate existing assessment tasks to determine how well digital capabilities are embedded
    • modify existing assessment and feedback tasks to build in new ways for students to develop or practice their digital skills.

    At the end of the workshop we will have created a list of 10 easy things that educators can do to enhance student’s digital literacies without having to overhaul their whole course or lesson plan.

  • Pecha Kuchas
    Presenter Title
    Barovich, Karin Rear view vision: 15 years of large class assessment and feedback strategies
    Cook, Andrew Canvas eportfolio
    Dry, Matthew Simple and effective approaches to improving exam-based assessments, and how to teach students to adopt empirically validated exam revision strategies.
    Flachsenberger Gower, Isabella From the virtual to the real: Assessment in VR
    Foley, Bernadette Rapid fire peer generated feedback
    Habel, Chad Feedback for Adaptive Leadership in the Adelaide MBA
    Heinson, Graham The National Exploration Undercover School: Learning from feedback not learning for assessment
    Howard, Carl MapleTA for Large Classes
    Jerram, Cate Immediate Feedback Assessment (& easy marking)
    Mariner, Fiona Data (Management) by Design
    Metcalfe, Andrew Debates in Statistics
    Nguyen-Hoang, Catherine Can you meet me half-way: Assessment as a tool for concept development for international students
    Schutz, Kym Pushing PowerPoint for Interactive Formative Assessment and Feedback
    Scott, Sharon Reflection: Turning experience into learning in the Adelaide Graduate Award
    Teramoto, Hiromi Say this... Because... And?
    Westphalen, Linda Education for Inclusion: Student-led conference

    Rear view vision: 15 years of large class assessment and feedback strategies

    Principle Presenter: Barovich, Karin, Faculty of Sciences
    Abstract: The same large first year course, the same course coordinator and lecturer, and 15 years of data and perspectives on assessment, feedback and the student response. There are things I know that have worked, probably things I don’t know that have worked, and still much I don’t understand.

    Canvas eportfolio

    Principle Presenter: Cook, Andrew, The University of Adelaide College, Faculty of Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences
    Abstract: Language for Study (LFS) has been utilising the ePortfolio function since the move to Canvas. This Pecha Kucha will outline the development of the ePortfolio in LFS and provide the reasons for using it. It will also describe how feedback is provided and how the ePortfolio is assessed.

    Simple and effective approaches to improving exam-based assessments, and how to teach students to adopt empirically validated exam revision strategies.

    Principle Presenter: Dry, Matthew, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
    Abstract: Examinations are an important assessment feature of many undergraduate courses and often constitute a large proportion of the final grade for the course. For example, in the first-year courses Psychology 1A and 1B the end-of-semester exam is worth 50% of the overall course grade. Two obvious challenges for any coordinator of courses that include high-stakes exams are 1. To ensure that these examinations are fair and equitable, and 2. To ensure that students are adequately prepared to sit the exam.
    In the following presentation I will outline a number of strategies that we have implemented in Psychology 1A/B to meet these challenges.
    In regards to the first of these challenges, I will describe a collaborative process that we have employed in the School of Psychology to develop exam items that map transparently onto defined learning objectives, and some simple statistical analyses that can be used to assess the quality of exam items and to identify items that need revision or replacement.
    In regards to the second of these challenges I will present evidence that indicates that many students are employing sub-optimal revision strategies when studying for exams, and outline a number of novel approaches that we have employed to guide students towards the adoption of revision strategies that have been empirically demonstrated to improve the retention and recall of examinable course concepts.

    From the virtual to the real: Assessment in VR

    Principle Presenter: Flachsenberger Gower, Isabella, Faculty of Arts
    Abstract: Classroom practice and teaching methods are rapidly developing and are becoming modernised to align with the principles of our current digital age. Classrooms are beginning to see an increase in technological advancements, with the introduction of new and cutting-edge technology appearing across curricula. Assessment methods are required to accommodate these technological changes. This adaption process is not always straightforward, with many new technologies demanding instantaneous feedback and/or involving a “digital space” where teachers are not necessarily present to oversee assessment. One contemporary development relating to education is the emerging utilisation of immersive virtual reality technology within the classroom. Immersive virtual reality is defined as a computer-generated environment in which a user feels immersed physically, perceptually and psychologically. Immersion is defined on a spectrum with desktop based virtual environments on the lower (less immersive) end and head mounted devices combined with haptic technology on the higher (more immersive) end. The single-user nature of immersive virtual reality makes traditional assessment methods not only logistically difficult, but potentially holistically unsatisfactory. In this session we present a framework for the practical use of immersive virtual reality technology in educational contexts, which addresses issues pertaining to the implementation of immersive virtual reality ranging from assessment considerations to practical safety consideration. This framework is based on the findings of a 2018 systematic review on the use of immersive virtual reality in education.  The framework aims to guide the use of immersive virtual reality in educational contexts and be a practical framework for individual practitioners and institutional leaders to refer to when incorporating immersive virtual reality into their curricula.

    Rapid fire peer generated feedback

    Principle Presenter: Foley, Bernadette, Faculty of Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences
    Co-Presenter: Lucy Preiss
    Abstract: A rapid fire feedback activity used in a first year project-based engineering course is outlined in this Pecha Kucha. The activity is structured to enable students to give and receive timely feedback in a safe environment. The activity results in a lively and collaborative learning environment, which complements more formal feedback.

    Feedback for Adaptive Leadership in the Adelaide MBA

    Principle Presenter: Habel, Chad, Faculty of the Professions
    Abstract: The 'cornerstone' course of the Adelaide MBA, Foundations of Leadership, facilitates student learning in a very different way to many of the program's more technical subjects. The approach to feedback is conversational and provocative, aiming to encourage students to take risks and face discomfort in their groups in order to learn more about the systems they work in (including their own group as a system) as well as themselves. It therefore avoids giving recipes or direct instructions for improvement, and a solutions-orientation that is becoming increasing limited in a business world full of volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity.

    The National Exploration Undercover School: Learning from feedback not learning for assessment

    Principle Presenter: Heinson, Graham, Faculty of Sciences
    Co-Presenter: Richard Lilly, Faculty of Sciences
    Abstract: The National Exploration Undercover School (NExUS; www.nexus.org.au) is a new initiative to provide world-class training in mineral exploration. The three-week summer school is funded by the Minerals Council of Australia (MCA) and run by the University of Adelaide for thirty geoscience students from around Australia, mostly at Honours level.   The program is a highly interactive teaching environment, but with no formal assessment we found that the students were more engaged and willing to learn without penalty.

    MapleTA for Large Classes

    Principle Presenter: Howard, Carl, Faculty of Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences
    Abstract: MapleTA software enables electronic assessment of students with randomised numbers in complicated mathematical questions, and personalised answers. As example, one assignment involving grading of 3000 responses, returning personalised solutions, and updating the gradebook, can be achieved within 30 minutes -- something not possible with hand-written assignments.

    Immediate Feedback Assessment (& easy marking)

    Principle Presenter: Jerram, Cate, Faculty of the Professions
    Abstract: Quality marking and adequate feedback for
    student learning and growth is one of the big challenges for teachers who are stretched for time. Early assessment with feedback that students can apply before Census Date; knowing if students have the foundation knowledge necessary to move on; teacher and students knowing what knowledge gaps need to be filled for students to succeed… and all this NOT taking nights and weekends to accomplish. The IF-AT has enormous advantages for teacher and student to address these needs with high quality results from less time-consuming investment. There are some specific challenges to overcome, but they are of the “once over the hill it’s smooth running” variety – yes, a degree of time investment up-front, but great time-dividends afterwards. This presentation will look at: [1] what is an IF-AT; [2] what are its advantages; [3] what are the challenges – and how do you overcome them; [4] where do you invest the time for major payoffs later; and [5] how can using IF-ATs improve the quality of your teaching and assessment simultaneously with the quality of your students’
    preparation and learning.

    Data (Management) by Design

    Principle Presenter: Mariner, Fiona, Division of Academic and Student Engagement
    Abstract: How do you design an online course for researchers that works for students and staff alike? And how do you assess your course outcomes in a way that is authentic and useful? This presentation describes the process that we went through in creating the online course Managing Your Research Data.

    Debates in Statistics

    Principle Presenter: Metcalfe, Andrew, Faculty of Engineering, Computer and Mathematical Sciences
    Co-Presenter: Samuel Rogers, Faculty of Sciences
    Abstract: We have used a formal debate as part of the assessment for an honours statistics course on several occasions. We explain the structure of this exercise, best suited to classes of between six and ten students, and give a few past examples. We review this year's debate and show that the
    students gain further experience of teamwork, public speaking, and presentation skills. We suggest that a debate helps them improve these
    skills in a memorable and enjoyable manner, and also encourages critical thinking about statistical issues.

    Can you meet me half-way: Assessment as a tool for concept development for international students

    Principle Presenter: Nguyen-Hoang, Catherine, Faculty of Arts
    Co-Presenter:Sarah McLeod, The University of Adelaide College
    ** Please note that we are not from any faculty at the University. We are from an external organisation.
    Abstract: One of the purposes of a Foundation Studies Programs (FSP) is to prepare international students for the academic rigors of university. A short story will be presented on the how assessment was changed in 2018 for General Mathematics in FSP at The University of Adelaide College to meet the diverse needs of international students. Assessments were adapted to be more inclusive of the journey they make in their transition to university, such that students are prepared for the demands of university that will be reflexive in their learning and future pursuits.

    Pushing PowerPoint for Interactive Formative Assessment and Feedback

    Principle Presenter: Schutz, Kym, Division of Academic and Student Engagement
    Co-Presenter: Michael Brockhouse, Division of Academic and Student Engagement; Georgia Gwyneth Forrest, Division of Academic and Student Engagement
    Abstract: This presentation will include interactive PowerPoint slides. It will show off the use of animations and timing to simulate auto-feedback quizzes, interactions and a simple timed game or two using just PowerPoint. It will show how clever use of technology can enhance well designed formative assessment activities.

    Reflection: Turning experience into learning in the Adelaide Graduate Award

    Principle Presenter: Scott, Sharon, Division of Academic and Student Engagement
    Co-Presenter: Melissa Connor, Work Integrated Learning, Faculty of the Professions
    Abstract: In 2017 the University of Adelaide launched the Adelaide Graduate Award ("the Award"), a scheme to recognize the employability skills that students develop through their co- and extra-curricular experiences. The Award focuses on experiential learning beyond the formal classroom. 

    Many university students are taking part in activities while studying for their degree, but they often do not recognize how the experiences contribute to their employability and their future careers. Moreover, they are not able to articulate the skills and capabilities they gain through their experience to others, including employers. They lack awareness of how their experiences contribute to the development of their personal and professional identity. Through reflection, the Award aims to turn their experiences into a learning opportunity.

    The Award is built around an inclusive, broad and flexible framework of volunteering, part-time work and personal and professional development and participants are encouraged to learn from diverse experiences. Generally, participants can include any experience where they are actively involved, and they can demonstrate the development of employability skills.

    The Adelaide Graduate Award is not a reward for participation and is underpinned by the principle that to learn from an experience, students must reflect upon their experience. Participants are encouraged to focus on the process of taking part in the Award rather than on the product of having the Award noted on their transcript. What elevates the Award from a participation scheme to a learning experience is the incorporation of reflection throughout the program. 

    This presentation reports on the implementation of the Adelaide Graduate Award and presents initial results from the first cohort highlighting the value of the self-reflective process to student learning.

    Say this... Because... And?

    Principle Presenter: Teramoto, Hiromi, Faculty of ECMS
    Co-Presenter: Catherine Irving, ECMS, academic staff
    Abstract: Feedback - hours of work: training for it, meeting about it, doing it, moderating it. We wanted to know whether the energy we expend on providing feedback on interim assignments achieves anything for our students (all international undergraduates), so we decided to study it as well. Apparently we give corrective, explanatory as well as challenging feedback. How do you think the students respond to our words of wisdom? What we found has led us to revise our approach.

    Education for Inclusion: Student-led conference

    Principle Presenter: Westphalen, Linda, Faculty of Arts
    Abstract: Student engagement in planning for learning is not new: Paulo Freire made it the basis for his philosophical stance on education, Critical Pedagogy, in the 1970s, and students have participated in peer-focussed collaborative work for many years.  Teachers in schools and universities have embraced group-focussed learning experiences, such that this pedagogic strategy is usual and sometimes written into university wide ‘best practice’.

    More recently, the idea of ‘student engagement’ has moved beyond simply participating in group learning: students now can collaborate with course conveners in the planning of learning experiences.  Since our students are to be teachers, this is a logical approach which provides opportunities for authentic modelling of teacher-experiences, as well as increasing student participation in planning, delivering and assessing.  Students are more invested in learning, contribute according to their talent and expertise, and show a genuine appreciation of the complexity of the teaching role.

    This presentation is designed to showcase the creation, assessment and reflection of a student- led conference.

    Uncertain times can also be thought of as ‘Interesting’ times. Diversity within the student cohort, financial and time pressures and the constraints of standardisation mean that student choices and voices in their learning are limited.  One way to address this issue is to devolve power and step back from planning, providing students and practicing teachers with a forum to practice more authentic teacher-experiences.  Student-led conferences are an audacious step toward professional autonomy, organisation, teamwork and presenting.

Map

We are currently finalising our program, check back soon for more information.

Address

Office of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor
& Vice-President (Academic)
The University of Adelaide
SA 5005 AUSTRALIA

Contact

Office of the DVC&VP(A)
T: +61 8313 5901
F: +61 8313 8333
Email: pvcsl@adelaide.edu.au

Festival of Learning & Teaching