Adjuncts and Affiliates

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  • Professor Paul Carter

    Professor Paul Carter

    Professor Paul Carter

    Biography

    Paul Carter is a historian, writer, philosopher and artist. He is Creative Director of Material Thinking at RMIT University, Melbourne. He also holds honorary professorships at the University of Melbourne and the University of Queensland. In 2006 he was George Simpson Visiting Professor at the University of Edinburgh.

    Paul collaborates with graphic artists, performers, architects and landscape designers and has received many national and state awards.

    He has authored a number of books mainly concerned with Australian history, Australian places and their identity. He has been involved with the design of some notable contemporary public spaces in Australia. In collaboration with Lab Architecture Studio he conceived and developed the design for the 'Nearamnew', the elaborate surface treatment of the public plaza at Federation Square in Melbourne. In addition to Nearamnew, his most notable public artworks include Named In The Margin (Hyde Park Barracks, Sydney, 1990) and Relay (Sydney 2000 Olympics, with Ruark Lewis). Paul's research focuses on the poetics of place-making, public space design and the application of creative research to community renewal, strategic planning and policy formation.

  • Professor Andrew Gibson

    Andrew Gibson

    Andrew Gibson

    Biography

    Andrew Gibson was born in London and educated at Truro Cathedral School, Lord Williams’s Grammar School, Thame and St. John’s College, Oxford, where he took a first class degree with honours in English Language and Literature and subsequently pursued his research. His first appointment was as Lecturer in Comparative Literature at the University of Hong Kong. In 1977 he returned to the UK as Lecturer in English at Royal Holloway College, University of London and has remained there since, his final and most distinguished appointment being as Research Professor in Modern Literature and Theory. He has lectured and taught in dozens of universities around the world, notably Northwestern University in Chicago, where in 2005 he was Carole and Gordon Segal Professor of Irish Literature, and the University of Tokyo, Japan’s premier university, where in 2002 he was Visiting Professor in English. His many books include Joyce’s Revenge: History, Politics and Aesthetics in `Ulysses’ (Oxford, 2002), Badiou and Beckett: The Pathos of Intermittency (Oxford, 2006), Intermittency: The Concept of Historical Reason in Contemporary French Philosophy (Edinburgh, 2012), Misanthropy: The Critique of Humanity (Bloomsbury, 2017) and the forthcoming Modernity and the Political Fix (Bloomsbury, 2019).

  • Professor Kurt Heinzelman

    Professor Kurt Heinzelman

    Professor Kurt Heinzelman

    Biography

    Kurt Heinzelman is Founding Co-Editor of The Poetry Miscellany and is currently the Advisory Editor of Bat City Review. He has been publishing poetry for thirty years in such journals as Poetry, Poetry Northwest, Georgia Review, Massachusetts Review, Marlboro Review, and Southwest Review.

    His scholarship, which has won various awards, is in the fields of British Romanticism and economic and cultural history. He is Editor-in-Chief of Texas Studies in Literature and Language. He teaches in the Department of English and the Michener Centre for Writers at the University of Texas at Austin. Kurt's research interests are: British Romanticism 1750-1850; poetry and poetics; creative writing; archives and collecting; modernism and cultural economics.

  • Professor Susan Sage Heinzelman

    Professor Susan Sage Heinzelman

    Professor Susan Sage Heinzelman

    Biography

    Susan Sage Heinzelman is Director, Center for Women's and Gender Studies, University of Texas at Austin. Her most recent book is Riding the Black Ram: Law, Literature, and Gender. The Cultural Lives of the Law, Series editor: Austin Sarat. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2010.

    Recent work includes ‘Teaching Eighteenth-Century Law and Literature: The Adventures of Rivella (1714) by Delarivier Manley (1672-1724)' and ‘Imagining the Law: The Novel.' Law and the Humanities: An Introduction. Eds. Austin Sarat, Matthew Anderson, and Catherine O. Frank. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2009.

  • Associate Professor Claire Roberts

    Dr Claire Roberts

    Associate Professor Claire Roberts

    Biography

    Claire Roberts is an historian of Chinese art and a curator. She was a Coordinate Research Scholar at the Harvard-Yenching Institute, Harvard University (2011); Research Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute For Advanced Study and Visiting Scholar, Fairbank Institute for Chinese Studies, Harvard University (2009-2010); Research Fellow with Geremie R. Barme’s Federation Fellowship project at the ANU College of Asia and the Pacific, The Australian National University (2006-2009); Senior Curator of Asian Arts at the Powerhouse Museum, Sydney (1988-2010; and Curator at the Museum of Chinese-Australian History, Melbourne (1986-1988).

    Claire studied at the Beijing Foreign Languages Institute (1978-1979) and the Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing (1979-1981). She has a Bachelor of Arts (1983) and a Master of Arts (1987) from the University of Melbourne. Her PhD (2006), undertaken in the Research School of Pacific and Asian History at ANU, focussed on the work of scholar, art historian and modern brush-and-ink painter Huang Binhong (1865-1955). Claire has published widely on Chinese visual and material culture, and curated numerous exhibitions including Go Figure! Contemporary Chinese Portraiture (2012), The Great Wall of China (2006), a collaborative project with the National Museum of China, Beijing; Earth, Spirit, Fire: Korean Masterpieces of the Choson Dynasty, a collaborative project with the National Museum of Korea (2000); Evolution & Revolution: Chinese Dress 1700s to Now (1997); and Post Mao Product: New Art From China (1992) exhibited at the Art Gallery of New South Wales and the Queensland Art Gallery. She was curatorial adviser, Chinese art, for the Asia-Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane (1993, 1996, 1999).

    Research interests

    Modern and contemporary Chinese art and visual culture, Chinese photography and the photography of China, The photographs of Hedda Hammer Morrison, The letters of Ian Fairweather, Artistic contact and dialogue between Australia and China.

    Publications 

  • Adjunct Professor Terence Crawford

    Terence Crawford

    Terence Crawford

    Biography

    Terence Crawford is an actor, playwright, dramaturg, teacher, theatre director, author and songwriter. He graduated from the National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) as an actor in 1984, and has since achieved a Masters (Hons) from James Cook University in 2000 with a dissertation on Chekhov in an Australian cultural context, and his PhD (University of Sydney), an ethnography focused on the political, social and artistic concerns of actors in rehearsal.

    Terence has acted with many of Australia's major theatre companies, and, since returning to Australia in 2008, has been a leading player for the State Theatre Company of South Australia, appearing as Albany in King Lear (2009), Capulet in Romeo and Juliet (2010), Judge Brack in Hedda Gabler (2013), Dr Dorn in The Seagull, and in 2017 in the nationally touring production of Orwell’s 1984. Terence is a ministerially-appointed member of the Board of Governors of STCSA.

    As a playwright, Terence has had work produced by Griffin Theatre Company, New Theatre, Theatre of Image and Sydney Theatre Company, as well as many smaller companies, and has had work produced on radio and television. His plays include Shondelle the Tiger, Fuck 'em if they can't take a joke, and the verse comedy hit, Love's Triumph. Among his radio plays is Seminary Songs, with original songs by Terence and his song-writing partner of 37 years, Richard Davies. Their songs also appear in the 2017 award-winning Adelaide Fringe production, One Night with Bonnie Weaver.

    Terence is among Australia's most esteemed and experienced acting teachers. He has held Head of Acting positions at Theatre Nepean (University of Western Sydney), Theatre Training and Research Programme, Singapore, LASALLE College of the Arts, Singapore, and Adelaide College of the Arts, and has directed at Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts (WAAPA), and been a guest at L'ecole internationale de theatre Jacques Lecoq, Paris. He has published two books on acting, along with the publication of reviews and short fiction.

    As well as teaching acting, Terence has taught play-writing, dramaturgy, and directing at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. A director of more than 20 productions, Terence has a particularly strong interest and history in Shakespeare, having directed twelve of his works.

    Current research

    Terence recently published the referred articles:

    “Feudal Positions and the Pathology of Contentment”. In About Performance 13: The Lives of Actors.  2015.

    “The Castanet Club: History, Provenance and Influence”. In Australasian Drama Studies, April 2015.

    Along with publication potentials beyond the completion of his PhD, Terence is pursuing research toward articles on the changing historical profile of Australian playwrights.

    Research interests

    Ethnography of theatre-related work; adaptation and translation theories, practices and politics; Chekhov; Shakespeare; multi-lingual theatre; adaptation of extant literature into song; singing and acoustic music in theatrical space.

  • Dr Shannon Burns

    Dr Shannon Burns

    Dr Shannon Burns

    Biography

    Dr Shannon Burns is a writer, reviewer, sometimes-lecturer in English and Creative Writing and sometimes-tutor in European Studies at the University of Adelaide.

    Publications

  • Dr Michelle Cahill

    Dr Michelle Cahill

    Dr Michelle Cahill

    Biography

    Michelle Cahill is a Sydney writer. Her short story collection Letter to Pessoa won the NSW Premier's Literary Award for New Writing and was shortlisted in the Steele Rudd Queensland Literary Awards. Her honours include the Hilary Mantel International Short Story Prize, the ABR Elizabeth Jolley Prize shortlist and the Arts Queensland Val Vallis Award. Vishvarūpa was shortlisted in the Victorian Premier's Literary Awards. The Herring Lass, is published by Arc (UK). She was the CAL/UOW Poetry Fellow at Kingston Writing School and a Visiting Creative Writing Scholar at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte. She co-edited Contemporary Asian Australian Poets and is Series Editor for Vagabond Press, deciBels3. She will be editing the Margaret River Short Story Prize Anthology 2019. She is completing postgraduate studies in Creative Writing at the University of Wollongong.

    Publications

  • Dr Dylan Coleman

    Dr Dylan Coleman

    Dr Dylan Coleman

    Biography

    Dylan is a Kokatha (Gugatha) Aboriginal/Greek woman from the far west coast of South Australia. She is a Lecturer in Yaitya Purruna Indigenous Health Unit, School of Population Health, at the University of Adelaide. In 2011, Dylan completed her doctorate at the University of Adelaide's English Department. It explores Indigenous narrative process and its capacity to recreate stories of trauma and loss into ones of survival and liberation. In 2011, the creative component of Dylan's PhD, Mazin Grace, won the Arts Queensland David Unaipon Award for Unpublished Indigenous Manuscript, as part of the Queensland Premiers Literary Awards. In 2012 Mazin Grace was published and in 2013 was longlisted for the Stella Prize, and shortlisted for the Commonwealth Book Prize.

    Her experience is in community engagement within various Indigenous communities throughout Australia, and in South Australia in the area of public health, with a focus on substance misuse and building community capacity and resilience through community controlled approaches to health.

    Dylan's research interests are: Indigenous community engagement; social determinants of Indigenous health; equitable and accountable frameworks in health policy development and delivery; intersections between creative media and psychological trauma recovery; King William IV's 1836 Letters Patent: founding document of South Australia (with enshrined native title rights), Aboriginal sovereignty and approaches to Aboriginal self-government.

  • Dr Gillian Dooley

    Dr Gillian Dooley

    Dr Gillian Dooley

    Biography

    Dr Gillian Dooley is a librarian, a writer, a musician and an editor. She is Special Collections Librarian and an Honorary Senior Research Fellow in English at Flinders University. Her research interests are: life and writings of Matthew Flinders; music in Jane Austen's life and work; Doris Lessing; V.S. Naipaul; Iris Murdoch; J.M. Coetzee; contemporary Australian literature.

    Her publications include Matthew Flinders Private Journal 1803-1814, coedited with Anthony J. Brown; From a Tiny Corner in the House of Fiction: Interviews with Iris Murdoch; critical monographs on V.S. Naipaul and J.M. Coetzee; articles on writers from Jane Austen to Doris Lessing; and hundreds of book reviews. She is the founding editor of the electronic journal Transnational Literature.

    Gillian has an abiding interest in the blending of her two principal passions, words and music, and she has researched and presented several musical programs and talks on literary-musical topics, mainly related to Jane Austen's music collections. Current projects include establishing Writers in Conversation, a new international electronic journal devoted to interviews with writers, and editing the correspondence between Iris Murdoch and Brian Medlin for publication.

  • Dr Fran Bryson

    Dr Fran Bryson

    Dr Fran Bryson

    Biography

    Frances (Fran) Bryson (PhD: University of Adelaide) is a travel/memoir writer whose primary research interests revolve around the uniqueness of people and place. In Brazil, her first book, was published by Scribe Publications in Australia & UK in 2016, translated into Turkish (pub. Siyah Kitap, 2018) and long-listed for the 2017 Margaret Scott Prize for best book by a Tasmanian writer. Her current project is concerned with islands across the world examining difference, uniqueness and island-life. On Islands (working title) will explore the history and psychology of smallness, specialness and isolation. Fran continues to work part-time as a literary agent, having been Managing Director one of Australia’s best-known literary agencies for more than a decade before turning to writing. When not travelling, she lives on Flinders Island, largest of the Furneaux islands, in the treacherous waters of Bass Strait in South-eastern Australia. Fran Bryson was recently appointed a Visiting Research Fellow at the J.M. Coetzee Centre for Creative Practice (University of Adelaide). Some of her writing can be found on her website.

    Website

  • Dr Kerryn Goldsworthy

    Dr Kerryn Goldsworthy

    Dr Kerryn Goldsworthy

    Biography

    Dr. Kerryn Goldsworthy is an Australian freelance writer and former academic. She has a B.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Adelaide. She taught at the University of Melbourne from 1981 to 1997 as a tutor and lecturer and has also worked briefly at Deakin, Flinders and Adelaide Universities, and at the University of Klagenfurt, in Austria. She was the editor of the Australian Book Review (May 1986 to Dec 1987), decades later she claimed that the experience involved her "learning more about human nature in those two years than in either the preceding thirty-three or the following nineteen."

    Goldsworthy also served as a member of the Literature Board of the Australia Council and has also been the recipient of Australia Council grants allocated from its Literature Fund.

    In 1997, Kerryn Goldsworthy returned to Adelaide and turned to freelance writing. She was a judge of the prestigious Miles Franklin Award for a year, until she resigned, along with two other judges, over a charter that changed the decision-making powers of the judges. She has also served as a Visiting Research Fellow at the University of Adelaide where she is a guest teacher in the Graduate Certificate course in Food Writing. She also writes for a number of weblogs. Goldsworthy's political views are left-wing. She once described herself as "an old fashioned feminist." In 2013 Goldsworthy was awarded the Pascall Prize 'Australian Critic of the Year', Australia's major national award for criticism.

  • Dr Lisa Harms

    Dr Lisa Harms

    Dr Lisa Harms

    Biography

    Lisa Harms is an artist, curator and writer whose work explores the function of textual, archival, online and material fragments in triggering memories, thoughts and feelings; in other words, her projects examine the ‘after-life’ of images. Her writing is interwoven with artistic and curatorial activities, staging interplays—virtual ‘conversations’—between philosophy, poetry, and politics that circle around the aporetic tensions of a lingering, (un)settled, specifically Australian post-colonial imaginary. Her projects address the notion of the domestic in relation to wider ‘domestic’ concerns: the poetics and the politics of postcolonial social and cultural relations; environmental care and consequence. The folding of private and public ‘domesticities’ into one another in her work effects a series of ‘turns’—like movements in a restless sleep— that propose “… a different kind of political ecology, where the ‘cosmos’ becomes a landscape for thinking and feeling—outside of individual ways of seeing the world, and in the potential for connecting with others” (Isabelle Stengers, in Hope: New Philosophies for Change, edited by Mary Zournazi, Annandale: Pluto Press Australia, 2002, 261).

    Lisa has curated numerous exhibitions, including Crystal Palace (in partnership with Flinders University Art Museum), conversations in ellipses (SASA Gallery, FELTspace Gallery, Adelaide Botanic Garden), little weeds: small acts of tenderness & violence (Peel St, Seedling Art Space, Hawthorndene & Adelaide Botanic Garden) and after the goldrush (SASA Gallery). Her artwork has been exhibited in numerous solo and collective exhibitions in galleries around Adelaide and as site-specific installation projects.

    Publications

  • Dr Rita Horanyi

    Dr Rita Horanyi

    Dr Rita Horanyi

    Biography

    Rita Horanyi is an emerging literary critic with an interest in literary modernism and modernity, theories of affect and melancholia, translation studies and Central/Eastern European culture, literature and history. She holds a PhD on melancholia in Hungarian literature and film under state socialism and was a recipient of the Copyright Agency/Sydney Review of Books emerging critics fellowship.

  • Dr Eva Hornung

    Dr Eva Hornung

    Dr Eva Hornung

    Biography

    Eva Hornung is a writer of literary fiction and non-fiction. Her latest novel Dog Boy was published worldwide in 16 languages and won the Prime Ministers Literary Award, Australia, and the Stora Ljudbokspriset, Sweden. She published her earlier fiction under the name of Eva Sallis.

    Eva Hornung is currently researching for a novel set in an isolated farming community around 1900, a fiction exploring selfhood, belonging and divergent religious beliefs.

    Publications

  • Dr Carol Lefevre

    Dr Carol Lefevre

    Dr Carol Lefevre

    Biography

    Carol Lefevre holds both an MA and PhD in Creative Writing from the University of Adelaide. She has published two novels and one work of non-fiction. Nights in the Asylum, Picador (UK) and Vintage (Australia) was shortlisted for the Commonwealth Writers' Prize, won the 2008 Nita B. Kibble Award for Women Writers and the People's Choice Award. If You Were Mine was published by Vintage in 2008. Quiet City: Walking in West Terrace Cemetery was published by Wakefield Press in 2016.

    Lefevre has been an invited speaker at Sydney Writers' Festival and Adelaide Writers' Week. Other publications include short fiction, journalism, and non-fiction, including a personal essay in the anthology Family Wanted: adoption stories, edited by Sara Holloway, which was published in the UK by Granta and in the USA by Random House. She is currently a Visiting Research Fellow at the University of Adelaide the recipient of the 2016 Barbara Hanrahan Fellowship at the Festival Awards for Literature.

    Her research interests include travel writing and creative non-fiction.

    Publications Staff Directory Website

  • Dr Amy Matthews

    Dr Amy Matthews

    Dr Amy Matthews

    Biography

    Amy T. Matthews is a novelist and has published short stories in collections including Best Australian Stories, and been long-listed for the Australian/Vogel literary award. She has co-edited two anthologies of short stories and poetry and was the winner of the 2010 Adelaide Festival Unpublished Manuscript Award for her novel End of the Night Girl, which was published by Wakefield Press in 2011. End of the Night Girl was shortlisted for the 2012 Dobbie Literary Award and the 2012 Colin Roderick Award.

    Amy T. Matthews' research is currently focussed on representations of place, and how the familiar can be rendered mythic. She is particularly interested in the way Australian fiction tends towards Realism, and the lack of genre fiction set in Australian cities. Through her writing she explores generic conventions, genre mashing, and transforming familiar Australian places (particularly Adelaide and its surrounds) into imaginative spaces, capable of containing magic.

    Her latest work, Navigating the Kingdom of Night, a mix of memoir and critical essay, was published by the University of Adelaide Press in 2013.

  • Dr Rachael Mead

    Dr Rachael Mead

    Dr Rachael Mead

    Biography

    Dr Rachael Mead is a poet, exhibiting photographer and experienced multi-media collaborator. Her primary areas of interest involve the theory and practice of ecopoetics and literary provocation of empathy for non-human life. She is currently undertaking new work and research into both ecopoetic representations of space and place in Antarctica and the issues of writing place in Australian landscapes haunted by the dispossession of indigenous custodians. Her other ongoing creative work includes a collection of short stories exploring the compounding effects of trauma on paramedics in South Australia and a photographic series capturing the textures of local ecology at both landscape and macro-level.

    Publications

  • Dr Gabriella Smart

    Dr Gabriella Smart

    Dr Gabriella Smart

    Biography

    Pianist Dr Gabriella Smart is a leading advocate of new music in Australia - through performance, improvisation, education, collaborative composition, commissioning and curation. In 2018, she is a recipient of the prestigious Prelude Composer Residency in Australia and a UNESCO City of Music residency in Katowice, Poland. Gabriella received a Churchill Fellowship in 2010, and a Helpmann Award in 2009. As an improviser she has collaborated and performed with such luminaries as Lisa Gerrard, Brian Ritchie, Alvin Curran, Cat Hope, and Derek Pascoe and Johannes Sistermanns (Blue Touch Trio). With a background as a multi-award winning pianist specialising in classical and new music, Gabriella has performed extensively in Australia and internationally, premiering over forty new works for solo piano by Australian and international composers in Australia, Europe and China. Her performance of Alvin Curran’s For Cornelius on 9/8/17 was described as ‘meltingly beautiful’ and ‘mesmerising’ (Graham Strahle from The Australian). She has performed widely as a soloist throughout Australia, and internationally, promoting the works of Australian composers. Gabriella has performed in the Melbourne and Adelaide International Festivals, MONA MOFO, TURA (Perth) and in Europe and China. In 2010 she represented Australia at the World Expo in Shanghai. Gabriella regularly gives numerous live and recorded broadcasts for ABC Classic FM.

    Website Staff Directory

  • Dr Heather Taylor Johnson

    Dr Heather Taylor Johnson

    Dr Heather Taylor Johnson

    Biography

    Heather Taylor Johnson is the author of two novels and four books of poetry, Meanwhile, the Oak (Five Islands Press) being her latest. She conceived and edited the anthology Shaping the Fractured Self: Poetry of Chronic Illness and Pain (UWAP), which won the 2018 Avant-garde Award for an anthology. She was the 2018 winner of the Griffith Review Novella Prize, has been shortlisted for the Newcastle Poetry Prize, and was published in Best Australian Poems 2017. From 2013-2017 she was Poetry Editor of Transnational Literature and, before that, for Wet Ink magazine. She’s thrilled to be returning to the University of Adelaide, where she received her PhD in Creative Writing in 2007.

    Publications

  • Dr Carrie Tiffany

    Dr Carrie Tiffany

    Dr Carrie Tiffany

    Biography

    Carrie Tiffany was born in West Yorkshire and grew up in Western Australia. She spent her early twenties working as a park ranger in Central Australia and now lives in Melbourne where she works as an agricultural journalist.

    Her first novel, Everyman’s Rules for Scientific Living (2006) was shortlisted for the Miles Franklin Literary Award, the Victorian Premier’s Literary Award, the Orange Prize for Fiction (UK), the Commonwealth Writer’s Prize, the Guardian First Book Award (UK) and was the winner of the Western Australian Premier’s Fiction Prize and the Dobbie Award.

    Her second novel, Mateship with Birds (2012) was shortlisted for the Prime Minister's Fiction Prize, the Miles Franklin Literary Award and the Melbourne Prize for Fiction. In 2013 Mateship with Birds was the winner of the Christina Stead Prize for Fiction and the inaugural Stella Prize.

  • Dr Sean Williams

    Dr Sean Williams

    Dr Sean Williams

    Biography

    Sean Williams is the author of forty novels, eighty short stories and the occasional poem. He writes for adults, young adults and children. His work has won awards, debuted at #1 on the New York Times hardback bestseller list, and been translated into numerous languages.

    His latest series are Troubletwisters, co-written with Garth Nix, and Twinmaker. Crashland and Hollowgirl are currently in press. A member of the Adelaide Writers' Week Advisory Committee, Sean has also served as a peer assessor for the Literature Board of the Australia Council and on the boards of The Big Book Club Inc, the Australian Society of Authors and the premier international body representing speculative fiction writers, SFWA. He is one of three life members honoured in its history by the SA Writers' Centre, and the only one still living in South Australia.
    Sean's research focuses on the matter transmitter ("Beam me up, Scotty."), a key but overlooked trope of science fiction.

  • Dr Annette Willis

    Dr Annette Willis

    Dr Annette Willis

    Biography

    Prior to taking up photography in 2002 Annette was a teacher, academic, research analyst and journalist. She has had ten solo exhibitions at galleries around Australia and has had work shown in London and New York. Annette explores issues and themes through narrative photo essays featuring images that are deliberate lyrical abstractions.

    Her photographic style is defined by striking, closely cropped compositions. Her early work focused on industrial heritage and the ephemeral: street art and street artists, Cockatoo Island, cemeteries, the odd things that turned up in the streets and crevices of local neighbourhoods, as well as nature images. Her photography has gained finalist places and Honorable Mentions in international photography awards including the Black & White Spider Awards (2007, 2008), the Julia Margaret Cameron Award for Women in Photography (2011), Prix de la Photographie (PX3) 2012, International Loupe Awards (2013) and the US Color Masters Cup (2013).

    Since 2006 Annette has added portraiture to her visual storytelling. She has been a finalist in many national and international portraiture prizes including Head On, Olive Cotton, the Moran Contemporary Photographic Prize, Sydney Life: Art and About and the London Photographic Association Portraiture Prize, Let's Face It. In 2006 she won the Wollongong Portraiture Prize.

    Annette's research is focussed on the dichotomous relationship between the Australian landscape and human habitation. She spent two years photographing the derelict Quarantine Station at North Head in Sydney. This work was exhibited as Reimagined Topographies at the Ballarat International Foto Biennale in 2009. Her current project is a broader and deeper extrapolation of the relationship between human habitation and the landscape and has led her to explore the use of sound, music and text in collaboration with other artists. Lost Geographies sheds light on the lives and histories of the people, places and communities who live on or north of Goyder's Line in South Australia.

  • Mr Ken Bolton

    Mr Ken Bolton

    Mr Ken Bolton

    Biography

    Ken Bolton works at the Australian Experimental Art Foundation in Adelaide and edits Little Esther books. A selection of his art criticism is collected in Art Writing (CACSA). He edited the magazines Magic Sam and Otis Rush, the memorial volume Homage To John Forbes and wrote the monograph on artist Michelle Nikou. He has published numerous books of poetry. Wakefield Press published The Circus in 2010 and Vagabond Press A Whistled Bit Of Bop. Puncher & Wattmann published Sly Mongoose in 2011. Shearsman Press (UK) published a new Selected Poems in 2013. Earlier titles include At The Flash And At The Baci and Untimely Meditations. Much of his collaborative writing with John Jenkins has been published. His research interests are in art theory and art history; continental philosophy and cultural studies; the innovative side of literature.

  • Ms Nicolette Fraillon

    Ms Nicolette Fraillon

    Ms Nicolette Fraillon

    Biography

    Nicolette Fraillon is a Visiting Professor at the University of Adelaide. She is Music Director and Chief Conductor for The Australian Ballet, and Artistic Director of Orchestra Victoria. Nicolette was a Partner Investigator on the 5 year ARC Linkage project, The Ballets Russes in Australia: Our Cultural Revolution.

    Nicolette's research activities focus on the nexus between music and choreography, in terms of reimagining key works in the balletic canon, and in the commissioning and performance of new works that explore the impact of the dynamic between music, movement and décor on artistic narratives.

  • Mr Lloyd Jones

    Mr Lloyd Jones

    Mr Lloyd Jones

    Biography

    Lloyd Jones is an award-winning fiction writer. His first collection of short stories was published in 1991, and he has also written books for children and numerous novels.

    His bestselling novel Mister Pip [2006] won several illustrious prizes and awards including the 2007 Commonwealth Writers' Prize Best Book Award and the 2007 Montana Medal for fiction. It was also shortlisted for the 2007 Man Booker Prize. Hand me down world [2010], a novel, was shortlisted for the 2013 International Berlin Prize. His most recent title is A History of Silence: a memoir [2013].

    Lloyd Jones was awarded an honorary doctorate in literature from Victoria University of Wellington, and in 2008 Jones won the New Zealand Prime Minister's Award for Literary Achievement.

  • Ms Catherine Kenneally

    Catherine Kenneally

    Catherine Kenneally

    Biography

    Catherine Kenneally is a poet, novelist, arts writer and broadcaster. Her two novels are Room Temperature (2001) and Jetty Road (2009), and her sixth poetry collection was Eaten Cold (2013). She won the John Bray National Poetry Prize for Around Here (2002) and is a past winner of the Barbara Hanrahan Award. She has been Arts Producer at Radio Adelaide since 1990, producing a national books and writing program, Writers Radio, and a magazine arts program, Arts Breakfast. She has been a longtime reviewer of books in many newspapers and journals, and written widely on the visual arts. She regularly judges in several categories for the Adelaide Festival Literary Awards. She has been a guest at many national and international literary festivals. She is also the author of About Being Here (2009), a monograph on Adelaide ceramist Angela Valamanesh. She was the the inaugural CAL Writing Fellow at the Coetzee Centre for Creative Practice at Adelaide University (2016).

  • Mr Thomas Shapcott

    Mr Thomas Shapcott

    Mr Thomas Shapcott

    Biography

    Thomas Shapcott was born in Ipswich, Queensland, on 21 March 1935, into a family of Scottish and Cornish descent. He was one of four brothers and also a twin, something that has featured in his poetry. After attending Ipswich Grammar School, he spent six months at a business college, and then joined his father's accountancy firm in 1951. During three months of then-compulsory national service in 1954, Shapcott began to write poetry seriously for the first time. His first published poem appeared in the Sydney Bulletin in 1956. Shapcott subsequently enrolled at the University of Queensland, completing an Accounting degree in 1961, and his Bachelor of Arts in 1967. He established his own accountancy firm in 1972, specialising in taxation advice for writers, artists and academics, which he ran until receiving a Literature Board Fellowship in 1975 and becoming a full-time writer.

    Shapcott's first collection of poems, Time on Fire (1961), won the Grace Leven Poetry Prize for that year, while his fourth, A Taste of Salt Water: Poems (1967) received the Myer Award for Australian Poetry. In 1971 he was awarded a Churchill Fellowship to visit America, a trip which led to the autobiographical poems in Shabbytown Calendar (1975) as well as the important anthology Contemporary American and Australian Poetry (1976) . In 1973 Shapcott was appointed to the newly constituted Literature Board of the Australia Council by the Whitlam Government and served as its Director from 1983 to 1990. Later he served as the Executive Director of the National Book Council from 1991 to 1997, when he became the inaugural Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Adelaide, retiring from the position in 2005 and continuing as a research affiliate thereafter.

    As well as his many volumes of poetry, Shapcott has written many novels, short stories, libretti, plays and reviews. He has received numerous awards for his contribution to Australian literature, including the Canada-Australia Literary Award in 1978, the Yugoslavia Struga International Poetry Festival Golden Wreath Award, 1989, the FAW Christopher Brennan Award, 1995, the Wesley Michel Wright Prize for Poetry, 1996, the New South Wales Premier's Special Literary Award in 1996 and the Patrick White Award in 2000. In 1989 he made an Officer of the Order of Australia; he has also received honorary Doctrates from Macquarie University and the University of Queensland.

  • Mr Arvo Volmer

    Mr Arvo Volmer

    Mr Arvo Volmer

    Biography

    Arvo Volmer is a Visiting Professor at the University of Adelaide's Elder Conservatorium. An internationally acclaimed orchestral conductor with a particular expertise in classical and romantic repertoire, Arvo is also Music Director of the Estonian Opera. He has for a number of years been Chief Conductor of the Adelaide Symphony Orchestra.

    Arvo's artistic praxis centres on the dynamic between recreation and reinterpretation of key works in the canon of Western art music. He is also a noted proponent of new operatic works, and in understanding the artistic process from commissioning to rehearsal, and performance to reception.