MDIA 1002 - Introduction to Media

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2019

This course explores why digital media is being seen as creatively, socially, and politically transformative. What is 'collective intelligence' and how is it empowered by digital tools? How are 'amateur' media makers impacting on mainstream media practices? This course explores the important questions being asked about new digital technologies and encourages critical, reflexive thinking about social media sites. It addresses the links between earlier communication forms and media institutions, through to contemporary digital and mobile technologies. Functioning as an introduction to the Bachelor of Media degree and the Media Major in the Bachelor of Arts, this core course orientates students to the key ideas they will develop through their studies. For students outside the media programs, this course introduces students to forms of media interactivity and methods of media analysis, as well as selected theories and debates about media's historical role in shaping social, cultural, economic, and political relations.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code MDIA 1002
    Course Introduction to Media
    Coordinating Unit Media
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Course Description This course explores why digital media is being seen as creatively, socially, and politically transformative. What is 'collective intelligence' and how is it empowered by digital tools? How are 'amateur' media makers impacting on mainstream media practices? This course explores the important questions being asked about new digital technologies and encourages critical, reflexive thinking about social media sites. It addresses the links between earlier communication forms and media institutions, through to contemporary digital and mobile technologies. Functioning as an introduction to the Bachelor of Media degree and the Media Major in the Bachelor of Arts, this core course orientates students to the key ideas they will develop through their studies. For students outside the media programs, this course introduces students to forms of media interactivity and methods of media analysis, as well as selected theories and debates about media's historical role in shaping social, cultural, economic, and political relations.
    Course Staff
    Course coordinator: Dr Catherine Son
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Understand key issues affecting the contemporary media industry and how these are studied in the Bachelor of Media program
    2. Conduct critical media analyses to examine technical, institutional and cultural arrangements through which media are created, distributed and consumed in contemporary societies globally
    3. Produce insightful discursive and semiotic analysis of texts, visual and audiovisual media content
    4. Manage individual and collaborative work, especially through effective use of time and communication (both face-to-face and via different media)
    5. Put into practice essential principles for professional conduct of work at university and in the media industry
    6. Produce effective written and oral communication to the standard expected at university and in the media industry using different digital platforms
    7. Develop research skills required to solve complex problems and creative challenges
    8. Get to know what university life and study are like, including familiarity with the different study plans available to Bachelor of Media students
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1,2,3,7
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1,2,3,7
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    4, 5, 8
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    4,5,6,7,8
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    1,2,3,4,5,6.7.8
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    4,5,6,8
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    There is no textbook or course reader for this course. Weekly readings (weeks 1-12) are available on MyUni for download and/or printing, and should be completed each week prior to the lecture. Students are encouraged to take notes on the readings, as these will be useful during tutorial activities.
    Recommended Resources
    Students may wish to purchase a media studies textbook to support their learning across their degree, BUT this is NOT essential. The following textbooks are recommended, but there are many more available:

    NOTE: All these books are available through the Barr Smith Library collection.

    • Branston, Gill and Stafford, Roy 2010, The Media Student’s Book, 5th ed., London: Routledge. [UK text]
    • Chalkley, T 2011. Communication, new media and everyday life, South Melbourne, Vic, Oxford University Press. [Australian text]
    • Cunningham, Stuart and Turner, Graeme 2014, The Media and Communications in Australia, 4th ed., Crows Nest, NSW: Allen and Unwin [Australian text]
    • Hartley, J. & Burgess, Jean , eds. 2013. A companion to new media dynamics, Chichester, England : Wiley-Blackwell
    • Hodkinson, Paul 2011, Media, Culture and Society: An introduction, London, Sage.
    • Miller, T. & Kraidy, Marwan M 2016. Global media studies, Malden, Massachusetts, Polity
    • Pavlik, John P. and McIntosh, Shawn 2011, Converging Media: a New Introduction to Mass Communication, 2nd ed., New York: Oxford University Press [US text]
    • Turow, Joseph 2011, Media Today, 4th ed., New York: Routledge [US text; Barr Smith only has 3rd ed.]
    Online Learning
    This course makes extensive use of MyUni and some external websites. All assignments are submitted via MyUni using a combination of online writing, online tests, and TurnItIn. The course also uses the Google Collaborate tool, built into MyUni. All course readings are linked directly from the MyUni site.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Lectures for this course are delivered live and recorded using the university’s Echo 360 system. Lecture recordings are automatically loaded to MyUni following delivery. Tutorial classes are held in a Computer Lab in order to facilitate students’ access to online resources and completion of assignments. Readings and other sources are provided using the Barr Smith Library Digital Resources Management Service or through externally hosted websites. Assignments and course participation involve a mixture of individual and collaborative work in class and online.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    1 x 2-hour lecture (or equivalent) per week 24 hours per semester
    1 x 1-hour tutorial (or equivalent) per week 12 hours per semester
    4 hours assignment preparation per week 48 hours per semester
    3 hours tutorial preparation per week 36 hours per semester
    3 hours reading per week 36 hours per semester
    TOTAL WORKLOAD 156 hours per semester
    Learning Activities Summary
    Week-by-week course content is available on the MyUni site. As a survey course, Introduction to Media looks at a range of media concepts and technologies, including social media, journalism, trolling, celebrity, and identity.
    Specific Course Requirements
    There are no specific course requirements.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Tutorial classes held in the Media Labs form an integral part of learning in this course. Students will gain SGDE by working in a combination of whole class and smaller groups under the guidance and supervision of the Course Coordinator or senior academic staff member to debate key questions raised by each topic and complete assignments. Each assignment requires students to conduct independent research about the media industry and prepare reports on their findings using a variety of online platforms, including blogs and wikis, as well as more conventional essay-style writing. Tutorial classes provide an opportunity for students to receive advice and support in the completion of this work from the academic staff who coordinate the course.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary

    Name Type Overall Value Workload Submission Mode
    Assignment 1 Multiple-choice test Diagnostic 10% Approximately 6-18 hours Online, via MyUni
    Assignment 2 Digital media analysis Online Project 30% 1200 words total
    (approx’ 18-24 hours work)
    Online, via MyUni
    Assignment 3 Essay Research assignment 50% 2000 words total, plus additional preparatory reading and research
    (approx’ 72-80 hours work)
    Online, via TurnItIn on MyUni
    Assignment 4 Participation Engagement 10% Based on work completed throughout the semester Tutor Moderated
    Note - Students must attempt all written assessments, and attend 80% of tutorials, in order to be eligible to pass the course
    Assessment Detail
    Multiple Choice Test: 10% . This test will be based on course readings. It will be available online through the MyUni website.

    Digital media analysis: 30% 1200 words. This asessment will be submitted through MyUni and will be an analysis of an app or website. The assignment will allow students to demonstrate their understanding and application of key course concepts.

    Essay: 50% 2000 words. This essay will be due at the end of semester and will be submitted through MyUni and Turnitin. It will be in answer to one of 5 questions that will be available through the course guide and MyUni website. This assignment allows students to develop in depth understanding of an area of the course content that is of particular interest to them.

    Participation: Each student will be marked on their participation in tutorials. Participation will be graded on whether students have engaged with the readings and lecture materials for the week, as well as engagement with their peers during class discussions and activities. Attendance at tutorials is compulsory.
    Submission
    Assignments are submitted via the MyUni course site. Feedback is provided through test responses, rubrics, comments in assignment text and in class.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    NOTE: Students who achieve an overall course mark of between 45% and 49% overall (i.e. a Fail mark within 5% of a Pass mark of 50%) will be offered an opportunity to resubmit a revised version of Assignment 3 (see above). The deadline for resubmission will be one week from notification of the overall course mark. The maximum overall course mark possible following resubmission will be 50%.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    In response to student feedback, we have make the following changes:
    1. Revision of course topics, to ensure the course meets the objective of providing a broad introduction to media
    2. Revise the types and topics of written assessment,
    3. Provide detailed advice on assessment criteria and expectations,
    4. Develop additional strategies to improve lecture engagement
    5. Kept on doing what students have liked: practical activities in tutorials, enthusiastic staff, and diverse and engaging content.
    We hope these changes will make this course better every year, but please provide your honest evaluation at the end of the course. We always pay careful attention to your evaluation and look for way to act on your advice and comments.
  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.