GEOG 1103 - Economy, Environment and Place

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2019

This course examines the interface between human economic activities and contemporary environmental issues. The course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to explore a variety of alternative pathways to green economies. The course critically analyses the mainstream economic way of thinking from philosophical and ethical perspectives. The course considers community-based natural resource management, Buddhist economics and ecology, and sustainable agriculture. In addition to academic resources, the course uses newspapers, novels, lyrics and movies to communicate the subject matter.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code GEOG 1103
    Course Economy, Environment and Place
    Coordinating Unit Geography, Environment and Population
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Incompatible GEST 1003
    Course Description This course examines the interface between human economic activities and contemporary environmental issues. The course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to explore a variety of alternative pathways to green economies. The course critically analyses the mainstream economic way of thinking from philosophical and ethical perspectives. The course considers community-based natural resource management, Buddhist economics and ecology, and sustainable agriculture. In addition to academic resources, the course uses newspapers, novels, lyrics and movies to communicate the subject matter.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Jungho Suh

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 Develop a sound understanding of the basic economic concepts, such as opportunity costs, prisoners' dilemmas, gross domestic product (GDP) and employment, and thier relevance to human-induced contemporary environmental problems. 
    2 Develop an understanding of public disputation over the choice of economic policy instruments in response to market failure.
    3 Examine the economic dimension of sustainability, using the concept of GDP and unemployment.
    4 Examine the limitations associated with GDP measurement, and understand various indices of human well-being. 
    5 Compare and contrast the ecocentric and anthropocentirc views of sustainability, making use of the conceptual framework of the I=PAT (Impact = Population x Affluence x Technology) equation.
    6 Examine the contested meaning of the utilitarian doctrine, 'the greatest happiness of the greatest number'.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ,6,
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ,6,
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ,6,
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    1, 2, 3, 4, 5, ,
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    1, 2, 3, 5, ,6,
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    1, 2,
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources

    There is no required text for this course. However, the following text is highly recommened.

    Cato, M.S. 2011, Environment and Economy, Routledge, London.

    Recommended Resources

    Recommened textbook

    Cato, M.S. 2011, Environment and Economy, Routledge, London.
     
    An electronic copy of this text is available via the University of Adelaide Library homepage. Hard copies are available from the University of Adelaide bookshop at the North Terrace Campus. Electronic copies of additional readings will be posted to the course MyUni.

    Online Learning
    The MyUni website for the course will provide you with access to course materials, announcements and many other features to help manage your study. You are advised to regularly visit the MyUni website for the course to receive course announcements and reminders.

    You will need the following to access MyUni:

    · a computer with an Internet connection;
    · a PC running Windows 95 or higher or a Mac running Mac OS 8.6 or higher;
    · a JavaScript enabled web browser (Netscape Navigator 4.7 or higher Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.0 or higher);
    · the Adobe Reader software
    (download from http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html);
    · your University of Adelaide username and password.

    To reach the MyUni website for the course follow the links from the University of Adelaide's Homepage http://www.adelaide.edu.au/ to Login to MyUni https://myuni.adelaide.edu.au/webapps/login. When you open the course website you will find material related to the course. You will need to enter a username and password to enter the MyUni website.

    If you have difficulty accessing MyUni contact the Help Desk at 831 33335 or send an e-mail to myuni.help@adelaide.edu.au.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Although the lectures are intended to help you understand the key concepts discussed in the textbook, the lectures aim to add value and not just to regurgitate the text. Some material presented in lectures may come from diverse other sources. Video or audio recording service will be provided for this course. The lecture PowerPoint slides will be posted, in pdf format, to the course MyUni webpage progressively after lectures. That way, you are free from having to reproduce the material in the Powerpoint slides during lectures. However, much detail will be conveyed to the audience verbally. All material covered in lectures are examinable. Therefore, it is imperative that you attend lectures and take notes.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Lecture: 2 hours per week
    Tutorial: 1 hour per week
    Lecture material reading: 3 hours per week
    Assignment preparation: 4 hours per week
    Exam preparation: 2 hours per week
    Learning Activities Summary
    Schedule
    Week 1 The foundation of the economic way of thinking
    Week 2 Neoclassical approach to environmental problems
    Week 3 Neoclassical approach to environmental problems (cont’d)
    Week 4 Sources of market failure
    Week 5 Sources of market failure (cont’d)
    Week 6 Policy responses to market failure
    Week 7 TBA
    Week 8 Economic growth and the economic dimension of sustainability
    Week 9 Economic growth and the natural environment
    Week 10 Pathways to a green economy
    Week 11 Pathways to a green economy (cont’d)
    Week 12 Course summary / Exam preparation
    * The sequence of lectures is subject to change.
    Specific Course Requirements
    Students are expected to participate in a one-hour tutorial per week throughout the semester except for Week 1 and Week 12 when there is no tutorial scheduled for this course. Students can attend their assigned session only unless otherwise arranged (see the below table). Your tutor will keep monitoring your tutorial attendance. In case anyone could not make it to their sign-up tutorial session but attended one of the other tutorial sessions, it is their responsibility to inform the tutors of that for monitoring purposes.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    You are expected to play an active role in a tutorial discussion group. This will include working through discussion questions, and making brief presentations and taking part in discussions. The discussions will help you be prepared for the end-of-semester examination as well as the ‘academic essay’ assignment.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Activity Weight (%)
    Tutorial participation 10
    Online quiz 10
    Mid-semester test 10
    Academic essay 30
    End-of-semester exam 40
    Total 100
    Assessment Related Requirements
    TBA
    Assessment Detail

    No information currently available.

    Submission
    TBA
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.