HIST 3034 - Migrants and the Making of Modern Australia

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2019

The Tampa crisis, widespread fears of 'people smuggling', and the revelations about the condition of asylum seekers in detention centres have reignited the debate about Australia's immigration policy and the way that we treat refugees. There is a perception that Australia has already 'done its bit' in generously accepting waves of displaced persons and refugees since World War II, and that further large-scale intakes will destabilise the Australian economy and threaten our 'way of life'. Yet others argue that Australia's post-war Displaced Persons Scheme was self-serving and oriented towards sourcing cheap labour for dangerous public works projects, and that while Australia opened its border to Asians and East-Europeans for the first time our preference was always for British migrants who continued to constitute the overwhelming majority of new arrivals. From this perspective the Australian government's current stringent migrant and refugee intake quota simply reflect the continuation of a long-standing and generally hard-hearted immigration policy. We will examine these different points of view, alongside the testimony of migrants and refugees who left behind everything and everyone they knew to make a new life in Australia. The course examines a range of other issues and debates concerning migrants in Australia, beginning in the late nineteenth century and continuing until the present day.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code HIST 3034
    Course Migrants and the Making of Modern Australia
    Coordinating Unit History
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 6 units of Level II undergraduate study
    Incompatible HIST 2052
    Course Description The Tampa crisis, widespread fears of 'people smuggling', and the revelations about the condition of asylum seekers in detention centres have reignited the debate about Australia's immigration policy and the way that we treat refugees. There is a perception that Australia has already 'done its bit' in generously accepting waves of displaced persons and refugees since World War II, and that further large-scale intakes will destabilise the Australian economy and threaten our 'way of life'. Yet others argue that Australia's post-war Displaced Persons Scheme was self-serving and oriented towards sourcing cheap labour for dangerous public works projects, and that while Australia opened its border to Asians and East-Europeans for the first time our preference was always for British migrants who continued to constitute the overwhelming majority of new arrivals. From this perspective the Australian government's current stringent migrant and refugee intake quota simply reflect the continuation of a long-standing and generally hard-hearted immigration policy. We will examine these different points of view, alongside the testimony of migrants and refugees who left behind everything and everyone they knew to make a new life in Australia. The course examines a range of other issues and debates concerning migrants in Australia, beginning in the late nineteenth century and continuing until the present day.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Paul Sendziuk

    Associate Professor Paul Sendziuk
    Napier 512
    Email: paul.sendziuk@adelaide.edu.au
    Ph: 8313 7562

    Paul Sendziuk is the author of Learning to Trust: Australian Responses to AIDS (2003), which was short-listed for the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission’s 2004 Human Rights award (non-fiction category), and co-author of A History of South Australia (2018). He is also the co-editor of Turning Points: Chapters in South Australian History (2012) and Foundational Fictions in South Australian History (2018). He has taught Australian and migrant history for a number of years, and published on a broad range of topics including environmental history and the history of disease. He is currently engaged in three research projects: a history of working at Holden; a history of post-WWII Polish migration to Australia; and a comparative history of cultural/artistic responses to AIDS in Australia, the United States and South Africa. In 2009 Paul was awarded the University’s highest teaching honour, the Stephen Cole the Elder Excellence in Teaching Award, and in 2011 received a national award from the Australian Learning & Teaching Council for ‘Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning’.
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    1. recognise the value of a wide range of methodologies, conceptual approaches and the impact of competing narratives;

    2. locate, identify and analyse relevant primary and secondary sources in order to construct evidence-based arguments;

    3. think independently and critically, using appropriate methodologies and technologies, to engage with historical problems;

    4. communicate effectively, in a range of spoken and written formats, within the conventions of the discipline of history;

    5. contribute productively to group-based activities;

    6. demonstrate the skills of an historian which are appropriate for performing a range of professional roles, undertaking leadership positions, and sustaining lifelong learning, including: information technology skills to manage data and to communicate, skills in collaborative and self-directed problem-solving, a habit of academic rigour, and sensitivity to intercultural and ethical issues;

    7. show a sensitivity to the diversity of historical cultures and the ethical implications of historical enquiry within a global context;

    8. demonstrate a critical, self-reflective approach to the study of history, based on respect and mutual responsibility.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    2, 3
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    4, 5
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    6
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    7
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    8
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    A reading pack will be available at the start of the course. It contains all of the essential texts (articles and chapters) that are required to be read in order to prepare for tutorial discussions.
    Recommended Resources
    You might consider purchasing one of the books below (they constitute essential or recommended reading for some tutorials, and constitute excellent 'background' reading). Due to copyright restrictions, only small sections of these books can be included in the reading pack.

    Klaus Neumann, Refuge Australia: Australia’s Humanitarian Record, Sydney: UNSW Press, 2004.

    Eric Richards, Destination Australia: Migration to Australia since 1901, Sydney: UNSW Press, 2008.

    James Jupp, From White Australia to Woomera: The Story of Australian Immigration, 2nd edition, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007.
    Online Learning
    This course has a website, accessible through MyUni. You should check this site regularly for updates, lecture recordings and slides, and additional readings/resources. The Barr Smith Library also has an extensive range of electronic academic journals that can be accessed via its computer catalogue.

    Lectures will be recorded and uploaded to the course's MyUni website. They will be accessible for approximately one week after the lecture is delivered. These recordings do not replace the experience of attending the lecture and engaging with the lecturer, so please make every effort to attend the lectures. Attendance at lectures is strongly recommended because they provide the context for the tutorial discussions and introduce themes and personalities that you will encounter in the more sophisticated tutorial readings.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Two one-hour lectures per week have been scheduled. Attendance at these lectures is strongly recommended as they provide the context for the tutorial discussions and introduce themes and personalities that you will encounter in the more sophisticated tutorial readings (i.e. they are closely entwined with the tutorial program). The final quiz will also be based on information provided in the lectures.

    Brief lecture slides and lecture recordings will be available online via the course's MyUni website, but these are a poor substitute for the real thing.

    Participation in tutorials (one per week) is a compulsory component of the course. You must attend at least 80% of tutorials to qualify to pass the course (unless a medical certificate is provided). Please inform your tutor prior to the tutorial if you are unable to attend. It will generally be possible to attend a 'make-up' tutorial in another time-slot.

    Please note:
    Lectures AND tutorials begin in Week 1 of semester.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    Students will need to devote approximately 12 hours per week to this course (divided over 12 weeks of study). This consists of 2 x 1-hour lectures and one tutorial per week, and 9 hours per week of independent study, during which time students will prepare for tutorials and work on assignments.

    Please note that the standard workload for a 3-unit course in the Faculty of Arts is designed on the assumption that all learning and assessment activities (including lectures, tutorials, preparatory work, research and writing of assignments etc.) will require approximately 156 hours.
    Learning Activities Summary
    The following list of lecture and tutorial is indicative of what students will study during the course.

    1 a. Migrants, Refugees and the Making of Modern Australia
       b. 19thC Race Relations and the White Australia Policy
    Tutorial: Introduction and Delegation of Tasks

    2 a. Child Migration to Australia
       b. Film - The Leaving of Liverpool
    Tutorial: The Origins of White Australia

    3 a. 'Empire Settlement': British Australia in the 1920s
       b. 'Citizens and Aliens' and 1930s Jewish Emigration to Australia: A Comparative Perspective
    Tutorial: Child Migrants

    4 a. 'Alien' Internment in WW2
       b. Migrant History through National Archives Documents
    Tutorial: Wartime Attitudes to Non-British Refugees and Migrants

    5 a. Effects of WW2 and Australia's Displaced Persons Scheme
       b. Experiences of Displacement
    Tutorial: Unwilling Migrants?: The Displaced Persons Scheme

    6 a. Assisted Migration to Australia and Assimilation
       b. 'Ten Pound Poms'
    Tutorial: Individual student consultations

    7 a. African Arrivals: The Somalis and Sudanese (guest lecture by a recent African migrant)
       b. Understanding the 'Cronulla ‘Riots'
    Tutorial: African Arrivals: Somalis and Sudanese

    8 a. Migrant Settlement Patterns in Australian Cities
       b. Multiculturalism and its Discontents
    Tutorial: Migrant Settlement: Ethnic Ghettoes or Multicultural Suburban Villages?

    9 a. Quiz
       b. How many is too many?: The 'Sustainable Population' Debate
    Tutorial: Multiculturalism and the Decline of 'White Australia'

    10 a. Indochinese Refugees
         b. The Asianisation of Australia?
    Tutorial: The Indochinese in Australia

    11 a. Migrant Selection Criteria from Fraser to Abbott
         b. Tampa-ing with Asylum: The Evolution of Refugee Settlement Policy
    Tutorial: Jumping the Queue: From Hawke to Abbott

    12 a. Alternatives to Detention - Azadi
         b. Final Quiz
    Tutorial: Asylum-Seekers and Detention
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    In essence, tutorial discussions in the Humanities epitomise small-group discoveries: students come together to share and contest what they have learned from the assigned readings, and to jointly respond to historical questions and problems that have been set by the tutor. During most tutorials, therefore, students will be examining questions and texts in small groups of 3 or 4 people.

    In this course, students will also have the opportunity to participate in a small group (3 persons) research project. The outcome of this research will be an organised debate between teams of students.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    There are three assessment tasks for this course. The group project will give you an opportunity to make some new friends, test your creativity and enhance your skills in oral communication. The research essay will develop your skills in critical analysis, evaluation of evidence and written communication. The final quiz will test knowledge gained throughout the course, with questions derived exclusively from the lectures. Students who work consistently throughout the semester, reading widely and attending classes, will be rewarded in the final quiz.

    1. 2,500 word research essay

    2. Student choice, either:

    (a) Organised debate between teams (to be presented during tutorial time); or
    (b) 2,000 word critical analysis of two academic texts (an individual written assignment)

    3. Two Quizes
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Discussion of the lecture material and tutorial readings constitute the core learning activities in this course. Due to the importance placed on tutorial discussions – where students will have the opportunity to problem-solve and test what they understand - students must attend 80% of tutorials in order to qualify to pass the course. Make-up tutorials are generally available for students who cannot attend the odd tutorial (i.e. due to a family emergency or illness).
    Assessment Detail
    There are three assessment tasks for this course. The first offers students a choice: to join a group and participate in an organised in-class debate or to write a critical review of two texts. The group project will give students an opportunity to make some new friends, test their creativity and enhance their skills in oral and visual communication. The second task is the research essay, which will develop students’ skills in critical analysis, evaluation of evidence and written communication. The final quiz will then test knowledge gained throughout the course, with questions derived mainly from the lectures.

    1. Research Essay

    Students are required to write one 2,500-word research essay, based on both primary and secondary sources. You may choose from a list of topics (to be provided), or devise your own question with the approval of your tutor.

    2. Student Choice - either (a) or (b) detailed below:

    (a) In-Class Group Debate
    Students will form teams of 3 members and have 2-3 weeks to prepare an argument ‘for’ or ‘against’ a proposition relating to a historical issue. Teams will then present their argument in the form of an Oxford-style debate to take place during tutorial. For example, if the statement is “The policy of multiculturalism has failed in Australia”, individuals on one team will take turns in making arguments in agreement with this statement and they will be opposed by a team disagreeing with them. Students will be assessed on the basis of the logic and validity of their argument, their use of examples to support their points, their level of organisation and team-work, and their ability to communicate with passion and persuasion.

    (b) Critical Review of Two Texts
    Students who choose not to participate in the group project will write a 2,000-word critical review of two seconary source texts selected from the reading list corresponding to a tutorial topic. One of them must be a book. Students are required to read the texts in their entirety before the applicable tutorial. Students are advised to discuss their text choices with their tutor and must not choose ‘primary sources’ (such as memoirs) or edited collections of essays as any of their texts.

    In writing their critical review, students should consider the following points:

    1. What do the authors argue?
    2. How do the authors deal with opposing arguments?
    3. What types of evidence do the authors use to construct their arguments? Is this evidence convincing? What evidence do the authors ignore?
    4. Are the authors influenced by a particular theory or methodological approach? Is this approach warranted?
    5. Are the authors’ arguments convincing? (You should assess this by comparing the different arguments and evidence presented by each author. You might also consult 2-3 other texts on the same topic.)
    6. What special tricks or strategies do the writers employ to make their points? These strategies may include the organisation of the text and the choice of language and examples.

    3. Two Quizes

    The quizes will consist of short-answer questions. They will be based entirely on content delivered in the lectures. Thus students who attend regularly and review their notes will be rewarded.

    To help students prepare for the final quiz, an online wiki will be created where students can post questions that they think might be asked. The course coordinator will occasionally 'cull' these questions to eliminate the implausible ones. A portion of the quiz questions will then be selected from the suggested questions that remain.
    Submission
    Essays must be submitted on/before the due date. A record will be kept of the date of submission. Instructions about how and where to submit will be given when the essay questions are distributed. Short extensions might be granted on the grounds of hardship or illness, but students will need to apply to the tutor in writing (with medical certificate or other evidence) and in advance of the due date. Students requiring a longer extension need to submit the relevant form to the School office (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/student/exams/mod_arrange.html) at least five days prior to the due date for the assignment.

    Late Submission
    The Department of History has adopted a standard policy for assessing assignments that are submitted late. For work that is late without formal extension, 2 marks will be deducted from the percentage mark for every day the work is late (including weekends and public holidays). For example, an assignment that is 3 days late: raw score of 80% - 6 marks lateness deduction = 74% final mark. For students who have been granted an extension, this policy will apply from the extended due date.

    Essays will only be accepted for 7 days after the due date. After this time, the mark of zero will be recorded.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    Dr Paul Sendziuk's teaching in this course was last evaluated by students in 2017. His teaching was viewed extremely favourably. The results of the survey, based on a scale of 1 to 7 (with 7 being the highest score) are as follows:

    1. Paul Sendziuk shows concern for students: 6.76 (out of 7)

    2. Paul Sendziuk encourages student participation: 6.62 (out of 7)

    3. Paul Sendziuk stimulates my interest in learning in this course: 6.86 (out of 7)

    4. Paul Sendziuk gives clear explanations: 6.86 (out of 7)

    5. Paul Sendziuk is an effective university teacher: 6.86 (out of 7)

    6. Paul Sendziuk gives me useful feedback on my work: 6.50 (out of 7)

    NB: These median response (i.e. the most recorded score from students) for each of these criteria was 7 out of 7.
  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
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