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Dr Marc Jones

Telephone +61 8 8313 5280
Position ARC DECRA Fellow and Associate Lecturer
Email marc.jones@adelaide.edu.au
Building Darling Building
Floor/Room 2 06
Campus North Terrace
Org Unit Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

To link to this page, please use the following URL:
http://www.adelaide.edu.au/directory/marc.jones

Biography/ Background

Marc's research encompasses the macroevolution of small vertebrate animals but focuses on specific topics such as feeding, function, biogeography, morphological variation, and systematics. This work has involved a number of techniques (e.g., geometric morphometrics, Multi-body Dynamics Analysis, Finite Element Analysis, cladistics) and a range of taxonomic groups (e.g., frogs, salamanders, lizards, tuatara, turtles).

 

Profile:

1997-2001 M.Sci Palaeobiology (First Class Honours). Earth Sciences, UCL, University College London, UK
2002-2002 Curatorial Assistant. National Museum Cardiff, UK
2002-2006 PhD Vertebrate Palaeontology. Cell and Developmental Biology, UCL, University College London, UK
2005-2006 Lab Teaching Assistant. Birkbeck, University of London, UK
2007-2007 Teaching Administrator. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK
2007-2010 Research Assistant. Cell and Developmental Biology, UCL, University College London, UK
2010-2013 Research Associate. Cell and Developmental Biology, UCL, University College London, UK
2013-. ARC DECRA Research Fellow and Associate Lecturer, Earth and Environmental Science, University of Adelaide, Australia

 

Various links:

Scopus: 35299370200
BioMed Experts: 1939821
UCL webpage: Marc Jones
Academia.edu: Marc Jones
ResearchGate: Marc E H Jones
Orchid: 0000-0002-0146-9623
UCL webpage: Evans Lab news
ResearcherID.com: C-1516-2010
Google Scholar citations: Scholar.google.com
An interview with Marc about a recent paper: Chewing, it's not just for mammals
A recent paper published in Current Biology with Alison Cree: tuatara
Follow Marc on twitter @MarcEHJones

 

Awards & Achievements

2002 Poster Prize, 1st. Palaeontological Association Annual Conference, Cambridge, UK
2003 Poster Prize, 2nd. Centre for Ecology and Evolution workshop, London, UK
2004 Poster Prize, 1st. Symposium of Vertebrate Paleontology, Denver, USA (http://www.vertpaleo.org)
2009 Chosen to participate in Evo 150 sponsored by the British Council and Spanish council for Scientific Research
2009 Invited by the British Council to participate in a Darwin Now events taking place in China
2011 Elected as a Fellow of the Linnean Society
2012 Awarded a Discovery Early Career Research Award by the Australian Research Council

 

Teaching Interests

Marc has teaching experience in a variety of science subjects related to zoology, palaeontology, anatomy, and general biology.

At University of Adelaide, Marc has contrubuted lectures to "Evolution and Palaeobiology of Animals III" (3320 ENVBIOL3122) and "Issues in Evolutionary Biology III" (3320 ENVBIOL3123).

At UCL, University College London, UK, he contributed lectures to "Vertebrate Life and Evolution" (BIOL3018), "Vertebrate Palaeontology and Evolution" (GEOL2008), "Biodiversity and Macroevolutionary Patterns" (GEOL3036), and "Introduction to Human Anatomy" (ANAT 1003). He also assisted with dissection room demonstrations for "Introduction to Human Anatomy" (ANAT 1003) and "Human Anatomy and Embryology" (ANAT2050). In addition Marc has served as an associate trainer for Think Write, a teaching administrator at London School of Hygiene and Topical Medicine, UK, and a lab teaching assistant for the Faculty of Continuing Education, Birkbeck College, University of London, UK.

 

Research Interests

  • The relationship between skull form and function in reptiles (particularly with respect to agamid lizards or Sphenodon and its fossil relatives).
  • The radiation and biogeographic history of small vertebrates such as frogs and lizards (particularly with respect to southern continents).
  • Ontogenetic and geographic variation in morphological traits.

 

Research Funding

Marc is primarily funded by the Australian Research Council on a Discovery Early Career Research Award. He is also part of a group that includes Amy Watson, Kate Sanders, Brett Goodman, Frank Neumann, Gustavo Carneiro, and Lei Chen funded by the Interdisciplinary Research Fund (University of Adelaide). Previously Marc has been funded by two postdoctoral grants from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council awarded to Professor Susan E. Evans (UCL, University College London, UK). He has also successfully obtained over AU$17,000 (>£10,000) in small grants from a variety of funding bodies including the Palaeontological Association, British Council, UCL Graduate School, UCL Bogue, Amphibia Tree, Synthesys and the Nuffield Foundation.

 

 

Publications

Peer reviewed journal articles:

  1. Jones MEH, Evans SE and Sigogneau-Russell D. 2003. Early Cretaceous frogs from Morocco. Annals of the Carnegie Museum 72: 65–97. Weblink
  2. Wang Y, Jones MEH, Evans SE. 2007. A juvenile frog from the Lower Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation Liaoning, China. Cretaceous Research 28: 235–244. DOI: 10.1016/j.cretres.2006.07.003
  3. Wang Y. Evans SE, Jones MEH. 2007. An aggregation of lizard skeletons from the Lower Cretaceous of China. Senkenbergiana lethaea 87: 109–118.
  4. Evans SE, Jones MEH, Krause DW. 2008. A giant frog with South American affinities in the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. PNAS 105: 2951–2956 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0707599105
  5. Jones MEH. 2008. Skull shape and feeding strategy in Sphenodon and other Rhynchocephalia (Diapsida: Lepidosauria). Journal of Morphology. 269: 945–966. DOI: 10.1002/jmor.10634
  6. Moazen M, Curtis N, O'Higgins P, Jones MEH, Evans SE, Fagan MJ, 2009. Assessment of the role of sutures in a lizard skull: a computer modelling study. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 276(1654): 39–46. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2008.0863
  7. Jones MEH, Tennyson AJD, Worthy JP, Evans SE, Worthy TH. 2009. A sphenodontine (Rhynchocephalia) from the Miocene of New Zealand and palaeobiogeography of the tuatara (Sphenodon). Proceedings of the Royal Society B 276: 1385–1390 DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2008.1785
  8. Anquetin J, Barrett PM, Jones MEH, Moore-Fay S, Evans SE. 2009. A new stem turtle from the Middle Jurassic of Scotland: new insights into the evolution and palaeoecology of basal turtles. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 276: 879–886. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2008.1429
  9. Jones MEH, Curtis N, O'Higgins P, Fagan M, Evans SE. 2009. The head and neck muscles associated with feeding in Sphenodon (Reptilia: Lepidsauria: Rhynchocephalia). Palaeontologia Electronica 12(2, 7A): 1–56. Weblink
  10. Zhang G, Wang Y, Jones MEH, Evans SE. 2009. A new Early Cretaceous salamander (Regalerpeton weichangensis gen. et sp. nov.) from the Huajiying Formation of northeastern China. Cretaceous Research 30: 551–558. DOI: 10.1016/j.cretres.2008.10.004
  11. Kieser JA, Tkatchenko T, Dean MC, Jones MEH, Duncan W, Nelson NJ. 2009. Microstructure of dental hard tissue and bone in the tuatara dentary, Sphenodon punctatus (Diapsida: Lepidosauria: Rhynchocephalia). Frontiers of Oral Biology 13: 80–85. Weblink
  12. Jones MEH. 2009. Dentary tooth shape in Sphenodon and its fossil relatives (Diapsida: Lepidosauria: Rhynchocephalia). Frontiers of Oral Biology 13: 9–15. Weblink
  13. Curtis N, Jones MEH, Evans SE, O’Higgins P, Fagan MJ. 2009. Visualising muscle anatomy using three-dimensional computer models - An example using the head and neck muscles of Sphenodon. Palaeontologia Electronica 12(3, 7T): 1–18. Weblink
  14. Jones MEH, Lappin AK. 2009. Bite-force performance of the last rhynchocephalian (Lepidosauria: Sphenodon). Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand 39(3): 71–83 Weblink
  15. Curtis N, Jones MEH, Evans SE, Shi J, O’Higgins P, Fagan MJ. 2010. Predicting muscle activation patterns from motion and anatomy: modelling the skull of Sphenodon. Royal Society Interface 7: 153–160 DOI: 10.1098/rsif.2009.0139
  16. Curtis N, Jones MEH, Lappin AK, Evans SE, O’Higgins P, Fagan MJ. 2010. Comparison between in vivo and theoretical bite performance: Using multi-body modelling to predict muscle and biteforces in a reptile skull. Journal of Biomechanics 43: 2804–2809. DOI: 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2010.05.037
  17. Curtis N, Jones MEH, Evans SE, O’Higgins P, Fagan MJ. 2010. Feedback control from the jaw joints during biting: an investigation of the reptile Sphenodon using multibody modelling. Journal of Biomechanics 43: 3132–3137. DOI: 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2010.08.001
  18. Kieser JA, He L-H, Dean MC, Jones MEH, Duncan WJ, Swain MV, Nelson NJ. 2011. Structure and compositional characteristics of caniniform dental enamel in the tuatara Sphenodon punctatus (Lepidosauria: Rhynchocephalia). New Zealand Dental Journal 107: 44–50.
  19. Jones MEH, Curtis N, Fagan MJ, O’Higgins P, Evans SE. 2011. Hard tissue anatomy of the cranial joints in Sphenodon (Rhynchocephalia): sutures, kinesis, and skull mechanics. Palaeontologia Electronica 14(2, 17A): 1–92. palaeo-electronica.org/2011_2/251/index.html
  20. Curtis N, Jones MEH, Shi J, O'Higgins P, Evans SE, Fagan MJ. 2011. Functional relationship between skull form and feeding mechanics in Sphenodon, and implications for diapsid skull development. PLoS ONE 6(12): e29804. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0
  21. Apesteguía S, Jones MEH. 2012. A Late Cretaceous "tuatara" (Lepidosauria: Sphenodontinae) from South America. Cretaceous Research 34: 154–160 DOI: 10.1016/j.cretres.2011.10.014
  22. Jones MEH, O'Higgins P, Fagan M, Evans SE, Curtis N. 2012. Shearing mechanics and the influence of a flexible symphysis during oral food processing in Sphenodon (Lepidosauria: Rhynchocephalia). The Anatomical Record 295: 1075–1091. DOI 10.1002/ar.22487
  23. Mannion PD, Upchurch P, Mateus O, Barnes RN, Jones MEH. 2012. New information on the anatomy and systematic position of Dinheirosaurus lourinhanensis (Sauropoda: Diplodocoidea) from the Late Jurassic of Portugal, with a review of European diplodocoids. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology 10: 521–551. DOI: 10.1080/14772019.2011.595432
  24. Meloro C, Jones MEH. 2012. Tooth and cranial disparity in the fossil relatives of Sphenodon (Rhynchocephalia) dispute the persistent ‘living fossil’ label. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 11: 2194–2209. DOI: 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2012.02595.x
  25. Jones MEH, Werneburg I, Curtis N, Penrose R, O’Higgins P, Fagan MJ, Evans SE. 2012. The head and neck anatomy of sea turtles (Cryptodira: Chelonioidea) and skull shape in Testudines. PLoS ONE 7(11): e47852 DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0047852
  26. Evans SE, Jones MEH, Matsumoto R. 2012. A new lizard skull from the Purbeck Limestone Group (Lower Cretaceous) of England. Bulletin de la Société Géologique de France 183: 517–524. DOI: 10.2113/​gssgfbull.183.6.517
  27. Gröning F, Jones MEH, Curtis N, Herrel A, O'Higgins P, Evans SE, Fagan MJ. 2013. The importance of accurate muscle modelling for biomechanical analyses: a case study with a lizard skull. Journal of Royal Society Interface 10: DOI:10.1098/rsif.2013.0216 
  28. Curtis N, Jones MEH, Evans SE, O'Higgins P, Fagan MJ. 2013. Cranial sutures work collectively to distribute strain throughout the reptile skull. Journal of Royal Society Interface 10: DOI:10.1098/rsif.2013.0442 please also see DOI: 10.1098/​rsif.2013.0584.
  29. Dong L, Roček Z, Wang Y, Jones MEH. 2013.  Anurans from the Lower Cretaceous Jehol Group of Western Liaoning, China. PLoS ONE 8(7): e69723. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0069723
  30. Integration of molecules and new fossils supports a Triassic origin for Lepidosauria (lizards, snakes, and tuatara)' will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology on 25 September 2013.

    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-09-oldest-lizard-like-fossil-hints-scaly.html#jCp
    Jones MEH, Anderson CL, Hipsley CA, Müller J, Evans SE, Schoch R. 2013. Integration of molecules and new fossils supports a Triassic origin for Lepidosauria (lizards, snakes, and tuatara). BMC Evolutionary Biology 13:208 DOI:10.1186/1471-2148-13-208
  31. Evans SE, Groenke JR, Jones MEH, Turner AH, Krause DW. 2014. New material of Beelzebufo, a hyperossified frog (Amphibia: Anura) from the Late Cretaceous of Madagascar. PLoS ONE 9(1): e87236. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0087236

    Integration of molecules and new fossils supports a Triassic origin for Lepidosauria (lizards, snakes, and tuatara)' will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology on 25 September 2013.

    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-09-oldest-lizard-like-fossil-hints-scaly.html#jCp
    Integration of molecules and new fossils supports a Triassic origin for Lepidosauria (lizards, snakes, and tuatara)' will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology on 25 September 2013.

    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-09-oldest-lizard-like-fossil-hints-scaly.html#jCp


Peer reviewed book chapters:

  1. Jones MEH. 2006. Tooth diversity and function in the Rhynchocephalia (Diapsida: Lepidosauria). In Barrett PM, Evans SE, eds. Ninth International symposium on Mesozoic terrestrial ecosystems and biota. London, UK: Natural History Museum. 55–58. 
  2. Evans SE, Barrett PM, Hilton J, Butler R, Jones MEH, Liang MM, Parish J, Rayfield EJ, Sigogneau-Russell D and Underwood C. 2006. The Middle Jurrasic vertebrate assemblage of Skye, Scotland. In Barrett PM, Evans SE, eds. Ninth international symposium on Mesozoic terrestrial ecosystems and biota. London, UK: Natural History Museum. 36–39. 
  3. Jones MEH. 2006. The Early Jurassic clevosaurs from China (Diapsida: Lepidosauria). In Harris JD, Lucas S, Kirkland J, Milner ARC, eds. The Triassic/Jurassic terrestrial transition. New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 37 548–562. Weblink
  4. Evans SE, Jones MEH. 2010. The origin, early history and diversification of lepidosauromorph reptiles. In Bandyopadhyay S. (ed.), New Aspects of Mesozoic Biodiversity, Lecture Notes in Earth Sciences 132, 27–44. DOI 10.1007/978-3-642-10311-7_2


Extended abstracts:

  • Jones MEH, Evans SE. 2009. The Early Cretaceous Herpetofauna of Anoual Morocco. In Buscalioni ÁD, Martínez MF, eds. Abstracts of the 10th international meeting of Mesozoic Terrestrial Ecosystems and Biota, Teruel. Spain, Madrid: UA Ediciones. 113–115.


Other articles:

  • Jones MEH. 2003. 1st London Evolutionary Research Network conference. Palaeontological Association Newsletter 52: 45. http://www.palass.org
  • Jones MEH. 2004. 47th Lyell meeting: dinosaur palaeobiology (meeting report). Palaeontological Association Newsletter 55: 65–67. http://www.palass.org
  • Jones MEH. 2005. Tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus). Chester zoo web page (http://www.chesterzoo.org/AnimalsandPlants/Reptiles/Tuatara.aspx).
  • Jones MEH. 2005. Erecting a database of known UK Sphenodon (Tuatara) material. Natural Sciences Collections Associations Newsletter 5: 34.
  • Jones MEH. 2007. Geometric morphometric analysis of variation in Sphenodon ‘sub-fossil’ material. Palaeontological Association Newsletter 65: 95–99. http://www.palass.org
  • Jones MEH, Ren X. 2008. Craniogenesis: The development evolution of the head (meeting report). Palaeontological Association Newsletter 68: 47–49. http://www.palass.org
  • Jones MEH. 2008. CEE modern functional anatomy workshop (meeting report). Palaeontological Association Newsletter 69: 37–42. http://www.palass.org
  • Jones MEH. 2009. Muscle activity in the tuatara mirrored by a computer model. Society for Research on Amphibians and Reptiles in New Zealand. Society for Research on Amphibians and Reptiles in New Zealand Notes 36: 5. SRARNZ
  • Jones MEH. 2009. The First pre-Pleistocene tuatara fossil relative from New Zealand. Society for Research on Amphibians and Reptiles in New Zealand Notes 36: 5–6. SRARNZ
  • Jones MEH, Clement A. 2009. 14th International Symposium on Dental Morphology (meeting report). Palaeontological Association Newsletter 72: 28–34. http://www.palass.org
  • Jones MEH, Lappin AK. 2009. First bite-force from an adult tuatara. Society for Research on Amphibians and Reptiles in New Zealand Notes 36: 3–4. SRARNZ
  • Jones MEH, Cree A. 2012. Tuatara. Current Biology 22: 986–987 DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2012.10.049
  • Pearson M, Jones MEH. 2013. 7th World Congress of Herpetology (meeting report). Palaeontological Association Newsletter 83: 64–68. http://www.palass.org
  • Jones MEH, Anderson CL, Hipsley CA, Müller J, Evans SE, Schoch R. 2014. New reptile fossil resets lizard molecular clock. E-Science 8: 16–17. http://escience.realviewdigital.com/?iid=86409#folio=16
  • Halliday T, Heckert A, Jones MEH. 2014. 72nd Annual Meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology (meeting report). Palaeontological Association Newsletter 85: 53–63. http://www.palass.org


Selected recent published abstracts:

  • Jones MEH, Schoch R, Evans SE. 2010. The origin and early history of Lepidosauromorpha (Diapsida). Zitteliana 29: 55.
  • Curtis N, Jones MEH, Evans SE, O’Higgins, Fagan MJ. 2010. The role and function for cranial sutures in reptiles: a finite element analysis of the skull of Sphenodon (Diapsida: Lepidosauria: Rhynchocephalia). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts Book 2010: 77.
  • Humphries ED, Jones MEH. 2010. Geographic variation in the jaws of Holocene Sphenodon (Lepidosauria: Rhynchocephalia) demonstrated by landmark analysis. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts Book 2010: 108.
  • Jones MEH, Curtis N, Evans SE, O’Higgins, Fagan MJ. 2010. Cranial joints in Sphenodon (Rhynchocephalia) and its fossil relatives with implications for lepidosaur skull mechanics.  Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts Book 2010: 113.
  • Lappin AK, Jones MEH. 2011. Empirical standardization of bite-force performance. Society for Integrative Biology 2011 Annual Meeting Abstracts.
  • Jones MEH, Zikmund T. 2012. A functional interpretation of the cranial suture morphology in Captorhinus aguiti (Reptilia). Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts Book 2010: 118.
  • Humphries ED, Jones MEH. 2013. Geographic variation in the jaws of Holocene Sphenodon (Lepidosauria: Rhynchocephalia) demonstrated by landmark analysis. Bulletin of the International Association of Paleodontology 7: 88. 14th ISDM 2011
  • Jones MEH. 2013. The mammal-like carnassial teeth of Clevosaurus and Tingitana (Reptilia: Diapsida). Bulletin of the International Association of Paleodontology
    7: 91. 14th ISDM 2011
  • Jones MEH, Benson RBJ. 2013. The classification of tooth attachment in tetrapods. Bulletin of the International Association of Paleodontology 7: 92. 14th ISDM 2011
  • Jones MEH, Benson RBJ. 2013. A new approach for understanding the diversity of tooth attachment in tetrapods. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, SVP Program and Abstracts Book 2013: 150.


Copies of all publications are available upon request.

 

Professional Associations


Current and recent collaborators:



Membership of professional bodies:

  • Linnean Society of London (LinnSoc)
  • Palaeontological Association (PalAss)
  • Society of Vertebrate Paleontology (SVP)
  • Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles (SSAR)
  • Society for Research on Amphibians and Reptiles in New Zealand (SRARNZ)
  • Anatomical Society (AnatSoc)

 

The Society of Vertebrate Paleontology (SVP

The Society of Vertebrate Paleontology serves to advance the science of vertebrate palaeontology and to this end it has held an annual meeting every year since its founding in 1940. Membership includes ~2300 professionals, students, artists, preparators, and avocationalists. Marc has had a long association with the Colbert student poster prize panel which serves to recognize an outstanding student poster presentation at the annual meeting.
2008-2010
Colbert Prize Panel Member (SVP student poster prize)
2008-2013 Student Roundtable Forum Expert (prizes and conference presentations)
2011 Colbert Prize Panel Co-Chair
2012-2013 Colbert Prize Panel Chair
2013-. Program Committee (for the annual meeting)

 

The London Evolutionary Research Network (LERN

In October 2002 Marc formed a committee of 8 students from 4 different universities and established the society LERN to facilitate greater interaction between students based in London who's research involved some aspect of evolution. During Marc's time as chairman he obtained funding from a variety of sources, built up a mailing list, contributed to the initial website, and helped organise over 20 talks from senior academics (e.g. Leslie Aiello, Andy Purvis, Janet Brown, Richard Nicholls, Adrian Lister, and Simon Conway Morris), 12 talks from PhD students, 2 student conferences and 2 fieldtrips. After several successful committee handovers the society remains active with a continually expanding membership, and growing international reputation. In 2012 Marc was an invited plenary speaker at LERN's 10th student conference.
2002-2003 Founding Chairman.
2003-2004 Committee Member (UCL representative).

 

Evolution Tree (The Academic Genealogy of Evolutionary Biology)
A free, volunteer-run website designed to help you track academic genealogy and record biographical information. Following consultation with various colleagues (e.g. Angela Milner, Andrew Milner, and Susan Evans) Marc has contributed 87 people and 88 connections. Of 1041 contributers this is the greatest number of people contributed (correct in Nov 2013).
2013-. Contributer

 

Community Engagement

 

Invited talks:

2007 The tuatara of New Zealand. Nature Live, Natural History Museum, UK.
2008 The New Zealand tuatara and its' fossil relatives. Institute of Animal Technology, London, UK.
2009
A new view of Rhynchocephalia: why Sphenodon is not a living fossil. Evolution 150, Cuenca, Spain.
2009 The New Zealand tuatara and its fossil relatives. Darwin Now, Science and Technology Museum, Xi'an, China.
2009 Fossil frogs from China and abroad. Darwin Now, Science and Technology Museum, Xi'an, China.
2009 Life after a PhD. Cumberland Lodge, Windsor, UK.
2009
New perspectives on the New Zealand tuatara (Sphenodon): feeding and evolution. Palaeobiology Discussion Group, University of Bristol, UK.
2010 The New Zealand tuatara, its fossil relatives and the real Welsh Dragon. Geologists Association South Wales Group and  Geology Society, University of Swansea, UK.
2010
Life after a PhD. Cumberland Lodge, Windsor. UK.
2010
Modeling muscle structure and activity in vertebrate skulls: implications for the analysis of extinct taxa. International Congress of Palaeontology 3, Imperial College, London, UK.
2010 The origin and early history of Lepidosauromorpha (Diapsida). Paläontologische Gesellschaft 2010, LMU, Münuch, Germany.
2011 (Feb) The tuatara of New Zealand. Nature Live, Natural History Museum, UK.
2011 (May) The tuatara of New Zealand. Nature Live, Natural History Museum, UK.
2012 A new approach to understanding the diversity of tooth attachment in tetrapods. London Oral Biology Club, Royal London Hospital, UK.
2012 Oral food processing in the tuatara reptile and why chewing is worthwhile. Palaeobiology Discussion Group, University of Bristol, UK. 
2012 Why the fossil record is crucial for understanding the evolutionary context of the New Zealand tuatara (Lepidosauria: Rhynchocephalia: Sphenodon). World Congress of Herpetology 7, Part of the symposium 'Insights from the fossil record into the evolution of extant amphibians and reptiles'. University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
2012 Early history of the London Evolutionary Research Network. LERN, UCL, University College London, UK.
2012 Why fossils are important for understanding the evolutionary context of the New Zealand tuatara. LERN, UCL, University College London, UK.
2013 (March) The tuatara of New Zealand. Nature Live, Natural History Museum, UK.
2014 Chewing over skull mechanics in an unusual reptile from New Zealand, EEG seminar, ANU, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.
2014
Chewing over skull mechanics in an unusual reptile from New Zealand, Institute for Applied Ecology talks, University of Canberra, Australia.

 

Recent conference talks:

2008 (Apr) CEE: Skull shape and feeding in Sphenodon and other Rhynchocephalia (Reptilia: Lepidosauria. Centre for Ecology and Evolution workshop: Modern approaches in functional anatomy. NHM, London.
2008
(May) PalHerp: Skull shape and feeding apparatus in Sphenodon and other Rhynchocephalia (Reptilia: Lepidosauria). Annual meeting of Paläontologie und Herpetologie, Berlin, Germany.
2008
(Aug) ISDM: Correspondence between tooth morphology and skull shape in Rhynchocephalia (Diapsida: Lepidosauria). 14th International Symposium of Dental Morphology, Greifswald, Germany.
2009
(Sep) MTE: The Early Cretaceous Herpetofauna of Anoual Morocco. 10th Mesozoic Terrestrial Ecosystems and Biota, Teruel, Spain.
2010 (Jul) QuaVer: Geographic variation in jaw shape of the New Zealand tuatara (Sphenodon) as shown by landmark analysis. Quaternary Vertebrate Research Group annual meeting, NHM, London.
2010 (Sep) SVPCA: Cranial bone deformantion in Sphenodon. 58th Symposium of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Comparative Anatomy, Cambridge, UK.
2010 (Oct) SVP: Cranial joints in Sphenodon (Rhynchocephalia) and its fossil relatives with implications for lepidosaur skull mechanics. 70th Annual Meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Pittsburgh, USA.
2011 (Aug) ISDM: The classification of tooth attachment in tetrapods. 15th International Symposium of Dental Morphology, Newcastle, UK.
2011 (Oct) SVPCA: Shearing in Sphenodon and related character acquisition in Mesozoic rhynchocephalians. 59th Symposium of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Comparative Anatomy, Lyme Regis, UK.
2011 (Oct) SVP: The first Middle Triassic lepidosaurs. 71st Annual Meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Las Vegas, USA.
2013 (Oct) CAVEPS: Further insights into the role of soft tissues in lepidosaur skull
mechanics.
2013 (Oct) CAVEPS: Integration of molecules and new fossils supports a Triassic
origin for Lepidosauria (lizards, snakes, and tuatara). Part of the symposium 'Phylogenetics: Bridging the Molecular–Morphological Divide'. 14th biennial Conference on Australasian Vertebrate Evolution, Palaeontology and Systematics.
2014 (Jan) ASH: Lepidosaur skull mechanics and the role of the chondrocraniumm. 50th meeting of the Australian Society of Herpetology, Grenhills (near Canberra), Australia.

 

 

Recent first or last author conference posters:

2011 (Jul) CCS: Sutures and intracranial movements in Sphenodon (Lepidosauria: Rhynchocephalia). 5th international meeting on Cranio-Cervical Systems, Paris, France.
2011 (Aug) ISDM: Geographic variation in the jaws of Holocene Sphenodon (Lepidosauria: Rhynchocephalia). 14th International Symposium of Dental Morphology, Newcastle, UK.
2011 (Aug) ISDM: The mammal-like carnassial teeth of Clevosaurus and Tingitana (Reptilia: Diapsida). 14th International Symposium of Dental Morphology, Newcastle, UK.
2011 (Dec) AnatSoc: Sutures and intracranial movements in Sphenodon (Lepidosauria: Rhynchocephalia). Winter Meeting of the Anatomical Society, Cardiff, UK.
2012 (Oct) SVP: A functional interpretation of the cranial suture morphology in Captorhinus aguti (Reptilia). 72nd Annual Meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology, Raleigh, USA.
2013 (Oct) SVP: A new approach for understanding the diversity of tooth attachment in tetrpods. 73rd Meeting of the Society of Vertebrate Palaeontology, Los Angeles, USA.
2014 (May) Mid-Mesozoic Field Conference: A new look at rhynchocephalian reptiles from the Late Jurassic Morrison Formation, Fruita, Colorado, USA.

  

Selected press attention:

2008 National Geographic: Giant "frog from Hell" fossil found in Madagascar.
2008 BBC News: 'Frog from hell' unearthed.
2008 Daily Telegraph: 'Frog from hell' that are baby dinosaurs.
2008 ScienceDaily: Giant frog jumps continents, may have eaten baby dinosaurs.
2008
MSN: Scientists find devil toad fossil.
2008
New Scientist: Sluggish reptile evolved at record speed.
2009 National Geographic: Tuatara ancestor adds to sunken New Zealand debate.
2009 New Scientist: Unusual fossil may rule out ancient flood.
2009 Nature research highlights: Biogeography: on jaws and geography.
2009 Science Daily: Reptile fossil reignites debate over New Zealand submergence.
2010 Laboratory News: Tuatara acts as model for false teeth damage.
2010 ScienceDaily: What can a New Zealand reptile tell us about false teeth?
2012
BBC News: Tuatara reptile slices food with 'steak-knife teeth'.
2012 New Scientist: Zoologger: strange reptiles saw heads off seabirds.
2012 ScienceDaily: Iconic New Zealand reptile shows chewing is not just for mammals.
2012 MSN: Strange reptile chews food with steak knife-teeth.
2012
Wired: New Zealand tuatara has a unique, bird-decapitating chew.
2012 the New York Times: A unique slice-and-dice strategy for chewing.
2012 Scope: New fossil find sheds light on present-day reptile.
2013 Phys.org: Oldest existing lizard-like fossil hints at scaly origins.
2013
ScienceDaily: Oldest lizard-like fossil yet to be found hints at scaly origins.
2013 Der Spiegel: Fund in Süddeutschland: Kieferknochen verrät Uralt-Echse.
2013 Nature World News: Oldest known lepidosaur fossils found in Germany.
2014 Live Science: "Primeval 'Devil Frog' may have sported anti-dinosaur armor"
2014 National Geographic: "Fossil "frog from hell" gets a new look"
2014 NBC news: "'Devil frog' sported anti-dinosaur body armor, scientists say"
2014 Daily Mail: "Ten inch 'Devil frog' was more terrifying that first imagined!"
2014 Daily Sentinel Colorado "Scientists from around the globe dig into a dinosaur lover's dream

 

 

Field Work Experience


Palaeontology:

1998 Dorset and Cornwall, UK.
1998 Yorkshire Coast, UK. Included Scarborough, Speeton Clay, Whitby, and Robin Hood’s Bay.
1999 Palaeozoic Welsh Basin: Ludlow, Meeting House Quarry, Clarach Cove, and Rheader Gorge.
2002 Palaeozoic fish localities in South East Australia (IPC), New South Wales, Australia. Included Grenfell, Canowindra, and Wee Jasper.
2003 Early Cretaceous Las Hoyas lagerstätte, near Cuenca, Castilla de Mancha, Spain (3 weeks).
2003 Isle of Wight, UK. LERN fieldtrip. Included the Yaverland, Hanover Point and Whitecliff.
2004 Yorkshire Coast, UK. LERN fieldtrip.
2004 Middle Jurassic Elgol microvertebrate site (Kilmaluag Formation), Isle of Skye, Scotland (3 weeks).
2005 Daohugou, Inner Mongolia, China.
2005 Late Triassic terrestrial localities of Arizona, USA.
2013 Kangaroo Island, Australia. Included Emu Bay and Kelly Hill Caves.
2014 Mid-Mesozoic Field Conference, Colorado & Utah, USA. Included Dinosaur National Monument, Fruita, and various other sites exposing the Morrison Formation and Cedar Mountain Formation.
2014 Magnetostatigraphy of the Morrison Formation, Denver. USA. Field assistant for Susannah Maidment (Imperial College, London).

 
Herpetology:

2010 Ecomorphology of lacertid lizards. Namibia (3 weeks).
2013
Functional morphology of agamid lizards. Included Wichelina, Owen Springs, and Trephina Gorge. South Australia and Northern Territory, Australia (2 weeks).
2014 Mojave desert, California, USA.

 

 


 

Journal Covers

 
Anatomical Record volume 87:




Anatomical Record volume 295:

 


 

Photos

 

Marc Jones taking part in a Nature Live event at the Natural History Museum London UK hosted by Charlotte Coales. Photo taken by Glenys Jones.



 

Video links


Marc Jones at Science Showoff, 2012 from Mally Sword on Vimeo.

 

 

An interview with Marc by UCL about a publication in The Anatomical Record: Shearing Mechanics and the Influence of a Flexible Symphysis During Oral Food Processing in Sphenodon (Lepidosauria: Rhynchocephalia)

 

 

An interview with Marc about a publication in Journal of Biomechanics: Feedback control from the jaw joints during biting: An investigation of the reptile Sphenodon using multibody modelling

 


 

 

 

 

Expertise for Media Contact

CategoriesAnimals & Veterinary Science, Palaeontology
Expertisereptiles; lizards; tuatara; Sphenodon; skull; turtles; fossil; bone; diet; feeding; biting; chewing; salamanders; frogs; Rhynchocephalia; Lepidosauria;
NotesMarc's research encompasses the macroevolution of small vertebrate animals but focuses on specific topics such as feeding, function, biogeography, morphological variation, and systematics. This work has involved a number of techniques (e.g. bite force measurements, Finite Element Analysis) and a range of taxonomic groups.

Entry last updated: Sunday, 31 Aug 2014

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