Research

The Centre for Heart Rhythm Disorders (CHRD) is at the forefront of developing new and innovative approaches to heart problems and patient care initiatives in Australia and internationally.

Our researchers have contributed greatly to the understanding of the mechanisms of various aspects of heart disease, in particular, atrial fibrillation, lifestyle and risk factor management. This research continues to attract numerous awards with national and international recognition.

Our investigators are involved in multiple studies of various types ranging from more 'pure' research to applied clinical trials and consultancies. We embrace collaborative research with other institutes, hospitals and industries, where our work is embedded in a worldwide research network.

Publications

For detailed information on our research, please see our current and past publications.

Read our publications

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  • Clinical trials

    HELP-AF: A randomised controlled trial assessing Home-based Education and Learning Program for Atrial Fibrillation - STUDY CLOSED

    ANZCTR Trial ID: ACTRN12611000607976

    University of Adelaide, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Flinders Medical Centre, Daw Park Repatriation Hospital, Modbury Hospital, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Lyell McEwin Hospital

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common abnormal heart rhythm in the population and its prevalence is rapidly increasing. Sufferers of atrial fibrillation have a significantly impaired quality of life and their medical management is placing a growing burden on the Australian health care system. The proposed study will examine whether a home-based education program, will reduce hospital use and improve quality of life in AF patients compared to those patients who experience usual medical care.


    MOre REsponse on Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy With MultiPoint Pacing (MORE-CRT MPP) - STUDY CLOSED

    ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02006069

    Royal Adelaide Hospital, St. Jude Medical, Amsterdam Academic Medical Center (AMC)

    The purpose of this Clinical investigation is to assess the impact of the Multi Point Pacing (MPP) feature at 12 months in the treatment of patients not responding to standard Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT) after 6 months.


    Cardiac Resynchronisation Therapy and AV Nodal Ablation Trial in Atrial Fibrillation Patients (CAAN-AF)

    ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01522898

    University of Adelaide, Medtronic, St. Jude Medical, Boston Scientific Corporation

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a treatment for heart failure in patients who also suffer from ventricular dyssynchrony, a form of uncoordinated contraction of the ventricle (lower pumping chamber of the heart). In the past decade, CRT has become an established treatment for heart failure patients who are in normal rhythm, called sinus rhythm. An important subset of heart failure patients are those with atrial fibrillation (AF), who make up around 1 in 4 HF patients, and are over-represented amongst HF patients with more advanced symptoms. In heart failure patients with AF, CRT has proven not to be as effective as in sinus rhythm, due to competition between beats generated by the CRT device and beats conducted from the heart's own electrical conduction system. In the current study, we aim to test the hypothesis that ablating the AV node, which controls electrical conduction from the heart's atria (top chamber) to its ventricles (lower chambers), will improve survival and heart failure symptoms in CRT patients with co-existent AF. The results are important, because they will provide a way of passing on the benefits of CRT, such as improved survival, less heart failure symptoms, and better quality of life, to heart failure patients who also suffer from AF.


    Implications of aggressive cardiac risk factor management on the catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (ARREST-AF)

    ANZCTR Trial ID: ACTRN12613000444785

    University of Adelaide, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Royal Melbourne Hospital

    Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) has evolved as an effective therapy for drug-refractory AF, and the indications have broadened in recent years. Despite decreased procedural times, reduced complication rates, post-ablation freedom from AF has not improved proportionately in recent years. Metabolic syndrome (MS) and its components, including obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia in conjunction with obstructive sleep apnoea, excessive alcohol intake and smoking has been associated with increased incidence of AF. However, the impact of modifications of these risk factors on recurrence of AF after catheter ablation is unclear and has not been tested prospectively. Also, these patients are typically not included in risk-factor reduction programs. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the impact of a structured weight management program as part of the management of atrial fibrillation. It is also intended to assess the effect of weight reduction on the efficacy of atrial fibrillation following catheter ablation and the effect of weight and risk factor management on autonomic tone/pro-arrhythmic substrate.


    Multi-Center Acute Safety Trial of TactiCath™ Contact Force Ablation Catheter, Sensor Enabled™ (TactiCath SE) for the Treatment of Drug Refractory Recurrent Symptomatic Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation (TactiSense-IDE)

    ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03354663

    Royal Adelaide Hospital, Ashford Hospital

    The purpose of this research study is to collect information on the safety and effectiveness of the TactiCath SE catheter when it is used to treat Paroxysmal AF. This study will collect information about the success of the procedure and report on the number and type of follow-up problems (adverse events) that may occur during or after the ablation procedure.

    Data collected for this study will be submitted for review and approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States of America (USA). Medications, drugs and devices that are routinely used have to be approved for use by the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) in Australia. The TactiCath SE catheter is approved for use in Australia and will be used in this research study to perform catheter ablation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation. 

    Medications, drugs and devices that are routinely used have to be approved for use by the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) in Australia. The TactiCath SE catheter is approved for use in Australia and will be used in this research study to perform catheter ablation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation.

    The TactiCath SE catheter is an updated version of a catheter previously approved by the TGA, FDA and Europe. From the previous version, changes to improve the handling of the catheter were made. Because of the updates that were made, the TactiCath SE catheter is considered investigational in the USA; however the TactiCath SE catheter has been commercially available in the European Union since May 2017 and in Australia since October 2017.

    This research is being conducted by Abbott (formerly St Jude Medical) and sponsored in Australia by St Jude Medical Australia Pty Ltd.


    Safety and Effectiveness of TactiCath™ Contact Force, Sensor Enabled™ (TactiCath SE) Catheter for Ablation of Drug Refractory, Symptomatic, Persistent Atrial Fibrillation. (PERSIST-END)

    ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03650556

    Persistent Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is a condition where an irregular rapid heartbeat occurs. This condition can sometimes be treated with medication, but this may not work well for all people.

    Cardiac ablation for persistent AF is a procedure that involves using a catheter (a thin, flexible tube that can be threaded through the blood vessels to the heart) to deliver radiofrequency energy (a type of heat) to one or more areas in the upper left chamber of the heart that is causing the irregular heartbeat. The tip of the catheter transmits energy to one or more small spots of heart tissue. This energy creates a small scar on the heart. This scar will block the electrical pathway that is causing the rapid heartbeat.

    The purpose of this research study is to demonstrate that the TactiCath SE catheter is safe and effective for ablating symptomatic, persistent AF that is not effectively treated with medication. Data collected for this study will be submitted for review and approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States of America (USA). This research is being conducted by Abbott and sponsored in Australia by Abbott Medical Australia Pty Ltd.


    Efficacy of DE-MRI-Guided Fibrosis Ablation vs. Conventional Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation (DECAAF-II)

    ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02529319

    Royal Adelaide Hospital, Ashford Hospital

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a condition of the heart that consists of disorganised electrical activity involving the entire atria (upper chambers) of the heart. AF is more prevalent with advancing age and is associated with structural heart disease including high blood pressure, systolic and diastolic ventricular dysfunction (dysfunction of the lower heart chambers), and disease of the heart valves. It represents a significant public health problem in the general population around the world. People with AF are more likely to have a stroke, a diminished quality of life, and a greater chance of heart failure or other conditions of the heart.

    Research has shown that people with AF have scarring or some amount of damaged tissue in their heart’s upper chamber. This scarred tissue can determine whether AF continues or whether it can be stopped. The more fibrosis, or scar tissue, that is present in the atrium, the more likely it is for the arrhythmia to continue. While conventional catheter ablation has been successful for rhythm control in AF, the success of this procedure is significantly affected by the amount of scar tissue at the time of catheter ablation. Some doctors target specific areas of the fibrotic or scarred tissue in addition to the regular ablation procedure. This type of ablation uses images of the fibrotic areas of the patients heart to help target the fibrosis (scarred areas), during the ablation procedure.

    Delayed-enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI) has been shown to be an effective way to image fibrotic and scarred cardiac tissue. Because DE-MRI technology is non-invasive (does not require a surgical procedure), it can be a very powerful method of identifying the quantity and location of fibrosis (also called structural remodeling) associated with AF.  By using DE-MRI to image the patient heart before the ablation procedure, the doctors are able to see the areas of fibrosis and use the MRI as a guide to perform the additional ablations that target the fibrosis.

    Participants in this study will receive a device used to record their own heart rhythm from home. Recently, a new technology patented by Cardiac DesignsTM allows patients to record their own electrocardiogram (ECG) using their smart phone or tablet computer. This device, called ECG Check, is FDA-approved and works with a smart phone or tablet computer. A free application on the smart phone or tablet allows the patient to record an ECG by holding their fingers on the sensors. The ECG is then sent to be analysed for arrhythmia by trained experts.  More information about the ECG Check device can be found at www.ecgcheck.com.

    This study is being conducted in conjunction with other sites across the United States, Europe, China and Australia. The purpose of this study is to compare the standard AF catheter ablation procedure (Group 1) with the standard ablation procedure and the delayed enhancement (DE-MRI) guided ablation procedure (Group 2) to determine which ablation procedure is more effective at reducing the chances of AF returning.


    Catheter Ablation for persistent atrial fibrillation: A Multicentre randomised trial of Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) vs PVI with posterior Left Atrial wall isolation (PWI). (CAPLA)

    ANZCTR Trial ID: ACTRN12616001436460

    Royal Adelaide Hospital

    Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is the most common disorder of heart rhythm. It is caused by abnormal, uncoordinated electrical impulses in the heart’s upper chambers, and may produce palpitations, fatigue, breathlessness, and pulse irregularity. It is also an important cause of stroke and heart failure.

    Correction of normal heart rhythm using medications is generally difficult, and AF ablation has emerged has an important alternative strategy. This keyhole procedure involves the use of specialised instruments to cauterise parts of the top chambers of the heart using heat energy (a process called ablation).

    Different approaches to AF ablation have evolved over the past decade that vary in terms of which heart structures are targeted for ablation. There is wide acceptance that it is crucial to ablate areas around the 2 pairs of veins which drain blood from the lungs into the heart. This electrically isolates the lung veins, the source of fibrillation in most cases, from the surrounding heart. This is the case for people suffering from paroxysmal AF. However, for patients with persistent AF, the ablation strategy is uncertain. Major study with multiple limitations concluded that just disconnecting the veins is all we can offer but more recently, additional ablation involving the top and bottom of the left atrial chamber of the heart may offer additional benefit in preventing AF from recurring.

    However, across the world, this procedure is performed in different ways, with no true consensus on which technique is the best. This study aims to compare two commonly accepted techniques which are very similar, to see if the technique that employs more ablation is or is not superior to the other. It is currently not known which is the case. This study will compare the relative efficacy of two most common approaches. The first (PVI ablation group) targets the lung veins (Pulmonary veins) and the second approach (BOX ablation group) targets the veins and the back wall of the heart with additional ablation at the top and bottom of the left atrium.

    AF ablation techniques (either PVI or BOX ablation) are approved in Australia to treat persistent AF.

    The results of this research will be used by the study doctor Hariharan Sugumar to obtain a Doctor in Philosophy (PhD) degree. This research has been initiated by Prof. Peter Kistler at Alfred Health, Melbourne, Australia.


    An International Clinical Feasibility Study to Evaluate the Safety and Performance of Low-Energy Unpinning Termination Therapy in Patients with VT/VF (Cardialen CL006)

    ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03871231

    Royal Adelaide Hospital

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the patient heart response to low-energy electrical pulse therapy for the treatment of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (abnormally fast heart rates and irregular heartbeats) that they are already planning to be treated for as part of their regular medical care. This study is intended to develop a new method of bringing back normal heart rhythm with lower energy.

    The device under investigation is the Cardialen External Stimulation System (CESS), which is computer system and electrical generator connected to wires in contact with the inside of the heart. The CESS delivers a specialised Unpinning Therapy (UPT) electrical stimulation to return hearts experiencing ventricular tachyarrhythmias to a normal rhythm.

    As part of the study, the physician will start a fast and irregular heart rhythm in a way similar to what would be done as part of standard of care treatment. Then, the investigational study device will deliver low-energy electrical pulses to the heart through the same wires used by the physician during ICD implant or replacement and additional wires or catheters used just for the study. During the study, detailed recordings of the patient heart rhythms will be collected for further analysis. During the study additional high-energy shocks may also be delivered in case the low-energy electrical pulses are unable to restore a normal heart rhythm or to learn how the low-energy electrical pulses compare to the energy needed for shock to restore a normal rhythm.

    This research study within the patient Standard of Care procedure (ICD Implant or VT Catheter Ablation) will last no longer than 60 minutes, and will typically last 20 to 30 minutes. 

    By learning how well low-energy electrical pulses may restore a regular rhythm in a heart during a planned treatment, a new therapy may then be developed for use in a procedure or be delivered by devices that could restore a regular heart rhythm without the potential pain or heart tissue effects associated with high-energy shocks. For example, current implantable cardioverter defibrillators provide high-energy shocks which are typically very noticeable and often painful to patients. A low-energy pulse therapy to treat heart rhythm irregularities may provide significant improvements for future patients suffering from irregular or abnormally fast heart rates.

    The CESS is an experimental treatment. This means that it is not an approved treatment for ventricular tachyarrhythmias in Australia. This research is being conducted by Cardialen Inc and sponsored in Australia by Five Corners Pty Ltd.


    Optimal Anticoagulation for Enhanced Risk Patients Post-Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation. (OCEAN)

    ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02168829

    Royal Adelaide Hospital

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an abnormal heart rhythm in which the top chambers of the heart (the atrial chambers) beat very fast. AF can increase the risk of developing clots in the heart which can then break off and travel to the brain and cause a stroke. Catheter ablation is a procedure which is used to restore the regular rhythm of the heart; however even when this treatment is successful, patients still may have an increased risk of having a stroke compared to people who have never had atrial fibrillation.

    In order to help reduce the risk of stroke, one of two types of medication may be prescribed to patients following their catheter ablation: an antiplatelet (such as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)), or an anticoagulant (also known as a blood thinner). This study is being done in order to find out which type of medication works best for preventing strokes.

    Participants will be prescribed either low dose ASA (aspirin) (an antiplatelet medication) or rivaroxaban (a blood thinner). Both medications have been approved by The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) for use in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    This is a research project being sponsored by The Ottawa Heart Institute Research Corporation.


    Sleep Apnoea and Atrial Fibrillation:  The Effect of Treatment of Sleep Apnoea on Atrial Fibrillation Burden (SLEEP-AF)

    ANZCTR Trial ID: ACTRN12616000088448

    Royal Adelaide Hospital

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a very common heart rhythm disturbance that is particularly evident with increasing age. It is caused by irregular electrical activity in the upper chambers (atria) of the heart.

    Sleep apnoea, a condition in which people stop breathing for periods of time during sleep is also very common and is often undiagnosed.  People with this syndrome stop breathing for varying periods of time.  This results in a drop in blood oxygen levels during sleep, which causes patients to half wake up.  These people are not aware of the arousals during the night.  As a consequence of the disruptions they are often very tired and unrefreshed during the day. However, many people with sleep apnoea are unaware that they have anything wrong with their sleep patterns.

    There are some small studies showing that treatment of sleep apnea improves heart rhythm disturbances such as AF. However, there are no high quality studies that show this.

    The study plans to investigate the possible association of these two commonly encountered conditions and in particular whether treating sleep apnoea reduces the risk of AF recurrence.  To do this patients who have both sleep apnoea and AF will be enrolled. This study may provide very important information about this link that can help us treat patients in the future.


    Stimulation Of the Left Ventricular Endocardium for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Non-Responders and Previously Untreatable Patients. (SOLVE-CRT)

    ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02922036

    Royal Adelaide Hospital

    Two multi-hospital clinical studies using the WiSE-CRT System have already been completed.  These studies measured the safety and performance of the system in heart failure patients who had previously failed conventional CRT treatment. These studies demonstrated 85% of patients improved over time. They also showed the WiSE-CRT System had a similar safety profile compared to conventional CRT systems. These studies were in small numbers of patients and must be repeated before we can be sure.

    The purpose of the study is to assess safety and effectiveness of the WiSE-CRT System in a larger set of patients than have been previously studied. This will benefit patients, doctors, hospitals, regulatory bodies and the manufacturer. Anonymised clinical data from patients will be collected to closely observe the safety and performance of this device for 2 years post-implant.

    What is the WiSE-CRT System?

    A conventional CRT device consists of a device implanted beneath the skin in the upper chest. This device delivers electrical energy to the heart via insulated leads. Two of these leads are implanted inside the heart in the right atrium (top chamber of the heart) and the right ventricle; another is implanted inside a vein on the outside of the heart over the left ventricle (bottom chamber of the heart). When electrical energy is delivered to the heart, it causes it to pump. WiSE-CRT is different from a conventional CRT device. It consists of an ultrasound transmitter implanted on the lower chest over the ribs, which is connected to a battery; a small receiving electrode (9mm long, less than 3mm thick) implanted inside the left ventricle. 

    WiSE-CRT is paired with the conventional pacemaker, defibrillator or CRT device that the patient already has implanted. This will continue to pace the right atrium and right ventricle. The WiSE-CRT will pace the left ventricle. The WiSE-CRT detects the electrical energy coming from lead implanted in the right ventricle. Immediately after detecting this, the WiSE-CRT will transmit an ultrasound pulse to the receiving electrode. The receiving electrode then converts the ultrasound energy into electrical energy. This happens so rapidly, that the right and left ventricles pump at almost the same time.

    The WiSE-CRT System is approved for use in Europe. In Australia, the WiSE-CRT System is considered an experimental treatment and is not an approved treatment for heart failure.

    This research is being conducted by EBR Systems, Inc and sponsored in Australia by EBR Systems (Aust) Pty Ltd.


    BIO CONCEPT BIOMONITOR III Study (BIOMONITOR III)

    ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03850327

    Royal Adelaide Hospital

    The purpose of this study is to confirm the safety and efficacy of the BIOMONITOR III system. In addition, the insertion procedure, the use and handling of the special procedural tools and the sensing quality of the BIOMONITOR III will be assessed. The BIOMONITOR III is an experimental device. This means that it is not an approved device for the detection and diagnosis of abnormal arrhythmias in Australia.

    BIOMONITOR III is a third generation ICM and is significantly smaller than the predecessor, the BioMonitor 2, which is already approved for the diagnosis of arrhythmias in Australia. The insertion procedure and respective tools have been optimised to improve the patient´s comfort and the usability of the device.

    BIOMONITOR III is able to detect slow, fast or irregular heartbeats and can record them in a heart tracing (Electrocardiogram or ECG). The BIOMONITOR III records those activities automatically, but participants are also able to record and save such activities when they experience symptoms, by using a small device called the Remote Assistant III. This is a hand-held, battery-operated, radio-frequency device used to trigger a recording of the BIOMONITOR III.

    The study doctor is able to read the recorded data and determine if and what kind of arrhythmias have occurred, such as rapid and irregular beating of the atria, known as atrial fibrillation. The doctor can also read the recorded data via the Home Monitoring Service Centre (HMSC), a protected internet platform from BIOTRONIK.

    Up to 45 eligible patients will be included in this study in up to 15 clinical sites located in Australia. About 4 patients will be enrolled at this site. This research is being sponsored and conducted by BIOTRONIK Australia Pty. Ltd., Pymble, Australia.


    PREDICT-ESUS

    University of Adelaide, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Calvary Wakefield, Ashford hospitals and Cardiovascular Centre.

    A randomised controlled trial assessing the predictive value of aggressive risk factor modification on the development of atrial fibrillation in Embolic Stroke of Undetermined Source


    A review of the inpatient and emergency department management of atrial fibrillation (REVIEW AF)

    University of Adelaide

    ANZCTR Trial ID: ACTRN12618001890224

    The aim of this project is to examine AF management within the hospital system and to characterise reasons for re-presentations to hospital in individuals with AF. The study population consists of individuals who presented to an emergency department in Adelaide, South Australia primarily due to AF. These individuals will be followed for 4 years to look at reasons for repeat emergency department presentations and hospital admissions over this time. Factors associated with these repeat hospital presentations will also be explored with a view towards identifying ways in which we can better address care delivery to meet the needs of the AF population and reduce associated health care burden.


    Cardiovascular risk factor management in atrial fibrillation (FACT AF)

    University of Adelaide, Cardiovascular Centre

    ANZCTR Trial ID: ACTRN12616001249448

    The aim of this study is to examine how cardiovascular risk factors such as weight, blood pressure, lipids, and glucose are managed in a contemporary cohort of individuals with AF. As these cardiovascular risk factors are correlated with AF burden and progression, this study will help to identify areas for improvement, with a view towards structuring future services to better address these factors in the AF population.


    A STructured Exercise, Physical Activity, and Education Intervention in Patients with an ICD (The STEP-ICD Pilot Study)

    University of Adelaide, Cardiovascular Centre

    ANZCTR Trial ID: ACTRN12617001382369

    This study is exploring the impact of a goal directed exercise intervention, combined with nurse led education, in individuals receiving a primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). Individuals receiving a primary prevention ICD are known to have poor quality of life and high levels of anxiety and depression. This study will determine if this intervention can improve exercise capacity, disease specific quality of life and anxiety and depression levels. My role in this study is the delivery of the nurse led educational component.


    Integrated care for atrial fibrillation (iCARE-AF)

    University of Adelaide, Royal Adelaide Hospital

    ANZCTR Trial ID: ACTRN12616001109493

    This is a study due to commence in late 2019 which will explore the impact of an alternative model of care delivery, known as integrated care, on all cause mortality and hospitalisations in a contemporary AF population. This will be undertaken across multiple sites in Australia and New Zealand. I am currently involving in developing the study materials and will be undertaking screening and recruitment for this study in addition to delivery of the intervention and data analysis.


    AF-AF: Autonomic dysFunction due to Atrial Fibrillation - The role of the brain-heart connection in Atrial Fibrillation; a common heart rhythm disorder

    University of Adelaide, Royal Adelaide Hospital

    ANZCTR Trial ID: ACTRN12619000186156

    We are investigating how Atrial Fibrillation (AF), a common heart rhythm disorder, disrupts normal cardiovascular reflexes by affecting nerves from the heart. Whilst it is known that nerves leading to the heart can cause AF, we aim to study whether nerves arising from the heart are equally implicated, in order to provide information that can be used to offer targeted treatment using these nerves.


    LIVE-REDUCED: A physician-led lifestyle interventional program with goals of weight loss and exercise participation in overweight and obese patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction

    University of Adelaide, Royal Adelaide Hospital

    ANZCTR Trial ID: ACTRN12617001143314

    This local-multicentre, prospective, randomised control study will aim to assess the impact of an intentional weight loss and a prescribed exercise program in overweight and obese patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HF-REF). 

    The impact of the program will be assessed by the measurement at 12 months of the change in exercise capacity (as measured by peak VO2 on CPET), and the change in KCCQ score compared with baseline measurements. Other data will be collected to assess the prognostic significance of intentional weight loss (including mortality, rate of hospitalisations, changes in New York Heart Association Classification (NYHA)), cardiac structural, functional, mood and cardiac biomarker changes. 

  • Awards received by our group

    2020

    1. Dr. Melissa Middeldorp, American Association of Women International Fellowship; May 2020.
    2. Dr. Jean-Jacques Noubiap, Heart Rhythm Society Travel Award, March 2020.
    3. Dr. Melissa Middeldorp, Heart Rhythm Society Travel Award, March 2020.

    2019

    1. Dr. Jonathan Ariyaratnam, Australian Government Research Training Program Scholarship; November 2019.
    2. Dr. Kadhim Kadhim, YIA Finalist, Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society Congress Bangkok, Thailand; October 2019.
    3. Dr. Thomas Agbaedeng, YIA Finalist, Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society Congress Bangkok, Thailand; October 2019.
    4. Dr. Christopher Wong, Fulbright Scholarship
    5. Dr. Thomas Agbaedeng, YIA Finalist, CSANZ/ISHR Joint Sessions, Adelaide, Australia; August 2019.
    6. Dr. Christopher Wong, Clinical and Preventative Cardiology Prize (Finalist), Cardiac Society of Australia and New 
    7. Dr. Christopher Wong, Indigenous Health Prize (Finalist), Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand.
    8. Dr. Christopher Wong, Poster Prize, Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand.
    9. Dr. Christian Verdicchio, PhD Awarded; June 2019.
    10. Dr. Thomas Agbaedeng, PhD Awarded; June 2019.
    11. Dr. Celine Gallagher, Dean’s Commendation for PhD Thesis Excellence.
    12. Dr. Celine Gallagher, PhD Awarded; June 2019.
    13. Mr Christian Verdicchio, Hospital Research Foundation Travel Grant
    14. Dr. Melissa Middeldorp, Dean’s Commendation for PhD Thesis Excellence.
    15. Dr. Melissa Middeldorp, PhD Awarded; May 2019.
    16. Mr. Christian Verdicchio, Young Investigator (Finalist) ESC Europrevent, Lisbon, Portugal.
    17. Dr. Varun Malik, The Focus On Australia - Abstract Award, European Heart Rhythm Society, Lisbon, Portugal.
    18. Ms. Celine Gallagher, Travel Grant, Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand.
    19. Dr. Christopher Wong, The Hospital Research Foundation Mid-Career Fellowship.
    20. Dr. Christopher Wong, National Heart Foundation Vanguard Grant. 
    21. Dr. Christopher Wong, National Heart Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship.
    22. Mr. Christian Verdicchio, EO Myers Trust Fund Travel Scholarship, National Heart Foundation.
    23. Ms. Celine Gallagher, Educational Grant, Association of Cardiovascular Nursing and Allie Professions.

    2018

    1. A/Prof. Dennis Lau, Promotion to Level D Academic position, University of Adelaide; December 2018.
    2. A/Prof. Dominik Linz, Promotion to Level D Academic position, University of Adelaide; December 2018.
    3. Ms. Celine Gallagher, Best Poster Award, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute and Heart Foundation Cardiovascular Research Showcase, Adelaide, Australia. 
    4. Ms. Melissa Middeldorp, Florey Medical Research Foundation Prize, University of Adelaide, 12th Annual Florey Postgraduate Research Conference.
    5. Ms Melissa Middeldorp, Northern Communities Health Foundation Prize, University of Adelaide, 12th Annual Florey Postgraduate Research Conference.
    6. Mr. Thomas Agbaedeng, 2-Minute Thesis (Finalist), Annual Scientific Meeting of South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute.
    7. Mr. Christian Verdicchio, Young Investigator (Finalist) Exercise and Sports Science Australia, Queensland, Australia. 
    8. Mr. Christian Verdicchio, Walter and Dorothy Duncan Trust Fund Travel Grant.
    9. Dr. Dominik Linz, Outstanding Reviewer Award - International Journal of Cardiology
    10. Ms. Melissa Middeldorp, RAH Medical Staff Society Research Prize – Finalist
    11. Ms. Celine Gallagher, RAH Medical Staff Society Research Prize – Finalist
    12. Mr. Christian Verdicchio, RAH Medical Staff Society Research Prize – Finalist
    13. Mr. Thomas Agbaedeng, RAH Medical Staff Society Research Prize – Finalist
    14. Dr. Christopher Wong, David Taverner Scholarship, SA Health.
    15. Dr. Dominik Linz, Best Reviewer - EP Europace
    16. Dr. Dominik Linz, Outstanding Reviewer Award - Heart Rhythm Journal
    17. Mr. Thomas Agbaedeng, Young Investigator Award, European Heart Rhythm Association Congress, Spain.
    18. Dr. Kashif Khokhar, St. Jude Medical Fellowship Scholarship; 2018-2019.
    19. Dr. Dominik Linz, Outstanding Reviewer Award - Canadian Journal of Cardiology
    20. Mr. Thomas Agbaedeng, EHRA Congress Travel Award, European Heart Rhythm Association.
    21. Mr. Christian Verdicchio, EO Myers Trust Fund Travel Scholarship, National Heart Foundation.
    22. Mr. Thomas Agbaedeng, National Scientific Travel Scholarship, Australian Society for Medical Research.
    23. Dr. Dominik Linz, Abstract Award, Cardiovascular and Sleep-disordered Breathing, German Society of Cardiology
    24. Ms. Melissa Middeldorp, AHM Research Travel Award

    2017

    1. Dr. Darragh Twomey, Dean’s Commendation for PhD Thesis Excellence.
    2. Dr. Adrian Elliott, NHF Fellowship
    3. Ms. Melissa Middeldorp, NHMRC Postgraduate Scholarship
    4. Dr. Dominik Linz, Travel Scholarship, University of Adelaide
    5. Mr. Thomas Agbaedeng, 2-Minute Thesis (Finalist), University of Adelaide.
    6. Ms. Celine Gallagher, Best Research Paper Presentation, Australian Cardiovascular Health and Rehabilitation Association.
    7. Ms. Celine Gallagher, Peoples Choice Best Presentation Award, Australian Cardiovascular Health and Rehabilitation Association.
    8. Mr. Thomas Agbaedeng, National Scientific Travel Scholarship, Australian Society for Medical Research.
    9. Mr. Thomas Agbaedeng, Best Abstract, Australian Society for Medical Research.
    10. Mr. Christian Verdicchio, EO Myers Trust Fund Travel Scholarship, National Heart Foundation.
    11. Ms. Celine Gallagher, Travel Scholarship, Australian Cardiovascular Health and Rehabilitation Association.
    12. Dr. Michael Stokes, Dawes Scholarship, Royal Adelaide Hospital Research Committee.
    13. Dr. Dominik Linz, Travel Scholarship, European Society of Cardiology.
    14. Ms. Melissa Middeldorp, Best Moderated Poster, European Society of Cardiology; August 2017.
    15. Dr. Jeroen Hendriks, Best Reviewer – Cardiovascular Nursing, European Society of Cardiology; August 2017.
    16. Dr. Dominik Linz, Top Scoring Abstract, European Society of Cardiology; August 2017.
    17. Dr. Dominik Linz, Best Poster Award, European Society of Cardiology; August 2017.
    18. Dr. Christopher Wong, Trainee Research Award, Royal Australasian College of Physicians.
    19. Mr. Thomas Agbaedeng, Ralph Reader YIA (Finalist), Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand; August 2017.
    20. Ms. Melissa Middeldorp, EO Myers Trust Fund Travel Scholarship, National Heart Foundation.
    21. Mr. Thomas Agbaedeng, CSANZ Travelling Scholarship, Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand.
    22. Mr. Thomas Agbaedeng, Adelaide Medial School Overseas Research Travel Award, University of Adelaide.
    23. Mr. Christian Verdicchio, Lions Medical Foundation Travel Grant.
    24. Mr. Thomas Agbaedeng, Young Investigator Award (Finalist), Cardiac Electrophysiology Society, USA.
    25. Dr. Dominik Linz, Travel Scholarship, German Society of Cardiology.
    26. Mr. Christian Verdicchio, Walter and Dorothy Duncan Trust Fund Travel Grant.
    27. Ms. Melissa Middeldorp, National Health and Medical Research Council Postgraduate Scholarship; 2017-2018.

    2016

    1. Ms. Celine Gallagher, Northern Communities Health Foundation Prize, University of Adelaide, 10th Annual Florey Postgraduate Research Conference.
    2. Mr. Christian Verdicchio, Adelaide Medical School Prize, University of Adelaide, 10th Annual Florey Postgraduate Research Conference.
    3. Dr. Kashif Khokhar, NZ Heart Foundation Overseas Scholarship.
    4. Ms. Melissa Middeldorp, AFib Awareness Award, Heart Rhythm Society.
    5. Dr. Shivshanker Thiagamani, Ralph Reader YIA (Finalist), Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand.
    6. Dr. Wei Wen Lim, PhD Awarded.
    7. Ms. Celine Gallagher, Educational Grant, European Society of Cardiology.
    8. Dr. Christopher Wong, Travel Scholarship, University of Adelaide School of Medicine.
    9. Prof. Prash Sanders, European Heart Journal Editorial Board Invitation.
    10. Dr. Rajeev Pathak/Prof Prash Sanders, Parmley Prize, Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
    11. Dr. Kashif Khokhar, Asia Pacific Overseas Research Fellowship.
    12. Mr. Christian Verdicchio, EO Myers Trust Fund Travel Scholarship, National Heart Foundation.
    13. Ms. Celine Gallagher, Travel Scholarship Award, Heart Rhythm Society.
    14. Dr. Rajeev Pathak, University of Adelaide Doctoral Research Medal.
    15. Dr. Rajeev Pathak, PhD awarded; January 2016.
    16. Dr. Rajeev Pathak, Dean’s commendation for Doctoral Research Excellence.

    2015

    1. Dr. Adrian Elliott, Young Investigator Award at the European Society of Cardiology.
    2. Dr. Rajeev K. Pathak, Late-breaking Clinical trial at the European Heart Rhythm Society.
    3. Dr. Rajeev K. Pathak, Late-breaking clinical trial presentation at the American College of Cardiology.
    4. Prof Prash Sanders, RT Hall Prize, The Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand
    5. Dr. Rajeev K. Pathak, Ralph Reader Young Investigator Award (First Prize), Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand.
    6. Dr. Rajiv Mahajan, University Medal for Doctoral Thesis Excellence.
    7. Dr Christopher Wong, Dean’s Commendation for Doctoral Thesis Excellence.
    8. Dr. Shivshankar Thanigaimani, Dean’s Commendation for Doctoral Thesis Excellence.
    9. Dr. Rajiv Mahajan, Eric N. Prystowsky Fellows Clinical Research Award, Heart Rhythm Society.
    10. Dr. Rajiv Mahajan, University of Adelaide Doctoral Research Medal.
    11. Ms. Celine Gallagher, Travel Scholarship, Council for Cardiovascular Nurses and Allied Health Professionals, European Society of Cardiology.
    12. Dr. Jeroen Hendriks appointed to the Derek Frewin Lectureship
    13. Mr. Christian Verdicchio, Faculty of Health Sciences Divisional Scholarship, University of Adelaide. 
    14. Ms. Melissa Middeldorp, Robert J Craig Scholarship, University of Adelaide; 2015-2018.
    15. Dr. Geetanjali Rangnekar, PhD Awarded; 2015.
    16. Dr. Muayad Alasady, PhD Awarded; 2015.
    17. Dr. Shivshankar Thanigaimani, PhD Awarded; 2015.

    2014

    1. Dr. Carlee Schulz, Dean’s Commendation for Doctoral Thesis Excellence.
    2. Dr. Carlee Schulz, PhD Awarded; 2014.
    3. Dr. Rajiv Mahajan, Leo J. Mahar Lectureship, University of Adelaide, Adelaide Australia; 2014-2018.
    4. Ms. Geetanjali Rangnekar, Best Poster Presentation Award, ASMR Scientific Meeting.
    5. Dr. Rajiv Mahajan, Dean’s Commendation for Doctoral Thesis Excellence.
    6. Dr. Rajiv Mahajan, PhD Awarded; 2014.
    7. Mr. Darius Chapman, Finalist for the Affiliate Prize, Annual Scientific Sessions of the Heart Rhythm Society, San Francisco, USA.
    8. Ms. Lauren Wilson, Finalist for the Affiliate Prize, Annual Scientific Sessions of the Heart Rhythm Society, San Francisco, USA.
    9. Dr. Rajeev Pathak, Eric Prystowsky Clinical Research Award, Annual Scientific Sessions of the Heart Rhythm Society, San Francisco, USA.

    2013

    1. Dr. Anand Ganesan, NHMRC New Investigator Grant; 2014-2017.
    2. Dr. Anand Ganesan, NHMRC Fellowship; 2014-2019.
    3. Dr. Christopher Wong, NHMRC Postgraduate Scholarship.
    4. Mr. Darius Chapman, APHRS Chaired Poster Award – Basic and Translational.
    5. Dr. Sachin Nayyar, APHRS Chaired Poster Award – Ablation.
    6. Dr. Rajiv Mahajan, APHRS Best Abstract Award.
    7. Mr. Darius Chapman, Adelaide Research and Innovation Prize.
    8. Dr. Christopher Wong, Travel Scholarship, Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand.
    9. Dr. Sachin Nayyar, Ralph Reader Young Investigator Award (Clinical Science - Finalist), Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand.
    10. Dr. Rajiv Mahajan, Ralph Reader Young Investigator Award (Basic Science – First Prize), Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand.
    11. Prof. Prashanthan Sanders, NHMRC Achievement Award for the highest ranked Practitioner Fellowship.
    12. Dr. Rajiv Mahajan, Heart Rhythm Society Young Investigator Award (Basic Science – First Prize).
    13. Ms. Melissa Middeldorp, Affiliates Prize for the highest ranked international abstract by an allied professional at Heart Rhythm Society, Denver, Colorado, USA.
    14. Dr. Christopher Wong, Travel Scholarship, University of Adelaide Discipline of Medicine.
    15. Dr. Han Lim/Prof Prash Sanders, Parmley Prize, American College of Cardiology.
    16. Dr. Hany Abed, American College of Cardiology Young Investigator Award (First Prize), American College of Cardiology.
    17. Dr. Christopher Wong, Florey Medical Research Foundation Postgraduate Scholarship.
    18. Dr. Darragh Twomey, Leo J. Mahar Electrophysiology Scholarship, University of Adelaide; 2013-2015.
    19. Prof. Prash Sanders, NHMRC Practitioner Fellowship; University of Adelaide; 2013-2017.

    2012

    1. Dr. Hany Abed, Samuel A. Levine Young Investigator Award (First Prize), American Heart Association.
    2. Ms. Carlee Schulz, Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society Young Investigator Award (Clinical: First Prize).
    3. Dr. Anand Ganesan, Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society Young Investigator Award (Basic Science: First Prize).
    4. Dr. Sachin Nayyar, Best Abstract Award, Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society.
    5. Dr. Darragh Twomey, Australian Postgraduate Award, University of Adelaide; 2012-2015.
    6. Dr. Rajeev Pathak, Australian Postgraduate Award, University of Adelaide; 2012-2015.
    7. Ms. Aakriti Gupta, Douglas Hardy Research Prize.
    8. Dr. Anand Ganesan, SA Heart Research Award.
    9. Dr. Christopher Wong, David Taverner Scholarship, Royal Adelaide Hospital.
    10. Dr. Sachin Nayyar, Poster Prize, Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand.
    11. Dr. Anand Ganesan, Michel Mirowski International Fellowship in Cardiac Pacing and Electrophysiology, Heart Rhythm Society; 2012-2013.
    12. Dr. Anand Ganesan, Heart Rhythm Society Young Investigator Award (Clinical – First Prize).
    13. Dr. Christopher Wong, SA Heart Research Award, SA Heart.
    14. Dr. Rajeev Pathak, Lions Postgraduate Medical Scholarship, University of Adelaide; 2012-2015.
    15. Dr. Rajeev Pathak, Leo J. Mahar Electrophysiology Scholarship, University of Adelaide; 2012-2015.
    16. Dr. Christopher Wong, Travel scholarship, National Heart Foundation Australia.
    17. Dr. Christopher Wong, McCredie/Wilcken Fellowship, Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand.
    18. Dr. Anand Ganesan, SCMR Young Investigator Award (Finalist).
    19. Dr. Hany Dimitri, PhD awarded, University of Adelaide, Adelaide.
    20. Dr. Payman Moalee, PhD awarded, University of Adelaide, Adelaide.
    21. Dr. Han Lim, NHMRC Neil Hamilton Fairley Fellowship.

    2011

    1. Dr. Anand Ganesan, Tom Simpson Trust Fund Grant, NHF South Australia.
    2. Ms. Tharani Perera, NHF Summer Scholarship.
    3. Prof. Prash Sanders, Editorial Board Invitation for Journal of Arrhythmia.
    4. Dr. Hany Abed, Young Investigator Award (Third Prize), Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society.
    5. Dr. Christopher Wong, Nimmo Professional Prize, Royal Adelaide Hosptial.
    6. Mr. Lachlan Frost, Poster Prize, Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand.
    7. Dr. Hany Abed, Ralph Reader Young Investigator Award (First Prize), Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand.
    8. Dr. Darryl Leong, PhD University of Adelaide, Adelaide, awarded; August 2011.
    9. Dr. Kurt Roberts-Thomson, NHF Tom Simpson Trust Fund.
    10. Dr. Kurt Roberts-Thomson, Sylvia and Charles Viertel Charitable Foundation Clinical Investigatorship.
    11. Dr. Scott Willoughby, NHF Grant-in-Aid; 2011-2012.
    12. Prof. Prashanthan Sanders, NHF South Australian Cardiovascular Research Development Grant; 2011-2014.
    13. Mr. Shivshankar Thanigaimani, Peter Hetzel Electrophysiology Scholarship, University of Adelaide; 2011-2013.
    14. Dr. Anand Ganesan, CVL Research Grant, Pfizer Australia.
    15. Dr. Dennis H. Lau, NHMRC Overseas Biomedical Research Fellowship; 2011-2014.
    16. Dr. Darryl Leong, NHMRC Overseas Clinical Research Fellowship; 2011-2014.
    17. Dr. Scott Willoughby, NHMRC Career Development Award; 2011-2014.
    18. Dr. Pawel Kuklik, NHF Postdoctoral Fellowship; 2011-2012.
    19. Dr. Mathias Baumert, ARC Discovery Project; 2011-2015.
    20. Mr. Shivshankar Thanigaimani, International Postgraduate Research Scholarship, University of Adelaide; 2011-2015.
    21. Dr. Rajiv Mahajan, Leo J. Mahar Electrophysiology Scholarship, University of Adelaide; 2011-2013.
    22. Dr. Rajiv Mahajan, Australian Postgraduate Award, University of Adelaide; 2011-2015.
    23. Dr. Rajiv Mahajan, International Postgraduate Research Scholarship, University of Adelaide; 2011-2015.

    2010

    1. Dr. Dennis Lau, PhD awarded, University of Adelaide, Adelaide; December 2010.
    2. A/Prof. Glenn Young, Promotion to Level D Academic position, University of Adelaide; December 2010.
    3. Dr. Sachin Nayyar, Robert J. Craig Electrophysiology Scholarship, University of Adelaide; 2010-2013.
    4. Dr. Scott Willoughby. Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand Travelling Fellowship to Attend the American Heart Association Meeting, Chicago, Illinois.
    5. Dr. Han Lim, NIMMO Prize (Finalist), Royal Adelaide Hospital.
    6. Dr. Muayad Alasady, NIMMO Prize (Finalist), Royal Adelaide Hospital.
    7. Dr. Dennis Lau, Young Investigator Award (First Prize – Basic Science Section), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society, Che Ju Island, Korea.
    8. Dr. Muayad Alasady, Best Paper Prize (Third Prize – Basic Science Section), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society, Che Ju Island, Korea.
    9. Mr. Christopher Wong, Rhodes Scholarship, Adelaide, Australia.
    10. Mr. Christopher Wong, Poster Prize, Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand, Adelaide, Australia.
    11. Dr. Muayad Alasady, Ralph Reader Young Investigator Award – Basic Science Section (Finalist), Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand, Adelaide, Australia.
    12. Dr. Darryl Leong, Ralph Reader Young Investigator Award – Clinical Section (Finalist), Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand, Adelaide, Australia.
    13. Dr. Dennis Lau, Poster Prize (Third place), American College of Cardiology, Annual Scientific Sessions, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
    14. Dr. Lorraine Mackenzie, CASS Foundation Travel Grant to attend the Heart Rhythm Society Scientific Sessions.
    15. Dr. Muayad Alasady, NHF Travel Grant to attend the Heart Rhythm Society Scientific Sessions.
    16. Ms. Carlee Schultz, NHF Travel Grant to attend the Heart Rhythm Society Scientific Sessions.
    17. Prof. Prash Sanders, Scopus Young Australian Medical & Medical Sciences Researcher of the Year 2010.
    18. Ms. Carlee Schultz, Australian Postgraduate Award, University of Adelaide; 2010-2012.
    19. Dr. Muayad Alasady, Medical Postgraduate Research Scholarship from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia; 2010-2011.
    20. Dr. Kurt Roberts-Thomson, South Australian Cardiovascular Research Development Program Fellowship; 2010-2012.
    21. Dr. Anthony Brooks, NHF “J” Trust Award.

    2009

    1. Prof. Prash Sanders, Australia-India Strategic Research Fund; 2009-2011.
    2. Dr. Anthony Brooks, NHF Grant-in-Aid; 2009-2010.
    3. Dr. Lorraine Mackenzie, NHF Grant-in-Aid; 2009-2010.
    4. Prof. Prash Sanders, NHF Grant-in-Aid; 2009-2010.
    5. Prof. Prash Sanders, NHMRC Project Grant; 2009-2011.
    6. Dr. Eugene Nalivaiko, NHMRC Project Grant; 2009-2011.
    7. Dr. Scott Willoughby, RAH Research Committee Project Grant.
    8. Dr. Declan Kennedy (Dr. Scott G. Willoughby), Women’s and Children’s Hospital Foundation Project Grant.
    9. Dr. Cameron van den Heuvel, Faculty of Health Science Small Grant Scheme, University of Adelaide.
    10. Dr. Hany Abed, Australian Postgraduate Scholarship, University of Adelaide; 2009-2012.
    11. Mr. Paolo De Sciscio, Ralph Reader Prize (Clinical – First Prize) at the Annual Scientific Sessions of the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand, Sydney, Australia.
    12. Dr. Dennis Lau, Best Poster Prize, American College of Cardiology, Annual Scientific Sessions, Orlando, Florida, USA.
    13. Dr. Dennis Lau, Best Poster Prize, Faculty of Health Science Research Day, Adelaide, Australia.
    14. Mr. Christopher Wong, Affiliates Prize (Finalist – 2 abstracts), Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand, Annual Scientific Sessions, Sydney.
    15. Mr. Christopher Wong, Australian Chinese Medical Association Research Prize (Part Time Research).
    16. Dr. Darryl Leong, Australian Chinese Medical Association Research Prize (Full Time Research).
    17. Dr. Hany Abed, Earl Bakken Electrophysiology Scholarship, University of Adelaide; 2009-2012.
    18. Ms. Lauren Wilson, Affiliates Prize (2 consecutive presentations) for the highest ranked international abstract by an allied professional at Heart Rhythm 2009, 30th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Heart Rhythm Society, Boston, MA, USA.
    19. Dr. Martin Stiles, PhD awarded University of Adelaide, Adelaide; August 2009.
    20. Dr. Kelvin Wong, PhD awarded University of Adelaide, Adelaide; August 2009.
    21. Dr. Kurt Roberts-Thomson, PhD awarded University of Melbourne, Victoria; August 2009.
    22. Dr. Anthony Brooks, Postdoctoral Research Fellowship, National Heart Foundation of Australia, 2009-2010.
    23. Dr. Han Lim, Medical Postgraduate Research Scholarship from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia; 2009-2010.

    2008

    1. Dr. Lorraine Mackenzie, ARC Discovery Project; 2008-2010.
    2. Dr. Anthony Brooks, RAH Research Committee Project Grant.
    3. Dr. Scott Willoughby, RAH Research Committee Project Grant.
    4. Dr. Scott Willoughby, Sir Edward Dunlop Medical Research Foundation Project Grant.
    5. Dr. Glenn Young, NHF Grant-in-Aid; 2008-2009.
    6. Mr. Kelvin Wong, PhD awarded, University of Adelaide; November 2008.
    7. Dr. Kurt Roberts-Thomson, Heart Rhythm Society Young Investigator Award (First Prize), NASPE Heart Rhythm Society, San Francisco.
    8. Dr. Dennis Lau, Young Investigator Award (First Prize), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society, Annual Scientific Sessions, Singapore, Singapore.
    9. Mr. Christopher Wong, Affiliates Prize (First Prize), Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand, Annual Scientific Sessions, Adelaide.
    10. Mr. Christopher Wong, Australian Chinese Medical Association Research Prize (Part Time Research).
    11. Dr. Dennis Lau, Best Poster Prize, Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand, Annual Scientific Sessions, Adelaide, Australia.
    12. Dr. Dennis Lau, NIMMO Prize for full time research, Royal Adelaide Hospital.
    13. Dr. Dennis Lau, Australian Chinese Medical Association Research Prize (Full Time Research).
    14. Dr. Martin Stiles, NIMMO Prize finalist for full-time research, Royal Adelaide Hospital.
    15. Dr. Bobby John, NIMMO Prize finalist for full time research, Royal Adelaide Hospital.
    16. Dr. Darryl Leong, NIMMO Prize for part-time research, Royal Adelaide Hospital.
    17. Dr. Bobby John, PhD awarded, University of Adelaide, Adelaide; November 2008.
    18. Dr. Pawel Kuklik, PhD awarded, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw, Poland; March 2008
    19. Ms. Lauren Wilson, Certified Cardiac Electrophysiology Specialist (CEPS) from the International Board of Heart Rhythm Examiners (IBHRE); above 95th percentile of results.
    20. Mr. Paolo De Sciscio, B Med Sci (First Class Honors), Faculty of Health Science, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia.
    21. Ms. Rachel Dreyer, B Sci (Honors), Faculty of Science, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia.
    22. Dr. Muayad Alasady, Dawes Scholarship, Royal Adelaide Hospital; 2008-2010.
    23. Dr. Muayad Alasady, Divisional Scholarship, University of Adelaide; 2008-2009.
    24. Dr. Kurt Roberts-Thomson, Neil Hamilton Fairley Fellowship from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia; 2008-2012.
    25. Dr. Darryl Leong, Postgraduate Medical Research Scholarship from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia and the National Heart Foundation of Australia; 2008-2011.
    26. Dr. Hany Dimitri, Postgraduate Medical Scholarship from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia and the National Heart Foundation of Australia; 2008-2010.
    27. Dr. Payman Molaee, Postgraduate Medical Scholarship from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia and the National Heart Foundation of Australia; 2008-2010.
    28. Dr. Dennis Lau, Postgraduate Medical Research Scholarship from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia; 2008-2009.
    29. Dr. Muayad Alasady, Earl Bakken Electrophysiology Scholarship from the University of Adelaide; 2008-2009.
    30. Dr. Han Lim, Earl Bakken Electrophysiology Scholarship from the University of Adelaide; 2008-2009.
    31. Mr. Kelvin Wong, Young Investigator Award, World Congress of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Munich, Germany.
    32. Dr. Dennis Lau, CSANZ Travelling Scholarship to attend the American Heart Association Annual Scientific Sessions.

    2007

    1. Prof. Prash Sanders, NHF Grant-in-Aid; 2007-2008.
    2. Dr. Payman Molaee, RAH Research Committee Project Grant.
    3. Dr. Lorraine Mackenzie, NHMRC Equipment Grant.
    4. Dr. Scott Willoughby, Coopers Foundation Equipment Grant.
    5. Prof. Prash Sanders, ARI Proof of Commercial Concept Grant.
    6. Prof. Prash Sanders, NHMRC Development Grant.
    7. Dr. Dennis Lau, CVL Research Grant, Pfizer Australia.
    8. Dr. Darryl Leong, CVL Research Grant, Pfizer Australia.
    9. Dr. Dennis Lau, St Jude Medical Research Grant.
    10. Dr. Declan Kennedy (Dr. Mathias Baumert), NHMRC Equipment Grant.
    11. Dr. Declan Kennedy (Dr. Mathias Baumert), NHMRC Project Grant; 2007-2009.
    12. Dr. Bobby John, Young Investigator Award (First Prize), Asia-Pacific AF Symposium, Taipei, Taiwan.
    13. Ms. Lauren Wilson, Affiliates Prize for the highest ranked international abstract by an allied professional at Heart Rhythm 2007, 28th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Heart Rhythm Society, Denver, Colorado, USA.
    14. Ms. Sujitha Thavapalachandran, Douglas Hardy Research Prize for the best student research project, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia.
    15. Mr. Kelvin Wong, AusBiotech Young Inventors Award (Finalist).
    16. Dr. Hany Dimitri, Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand Postgraduate Scholarship.
    17. Mr. Ross Roberts-Thomson, B Med Sci (First Class Honors), Faculty of Health Science, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia.
    18. Dr. Dennis Lau, Kidney Health Australia Biomedical Research Scholarship, Kidney Health Australia; 2007-2008.
    19. Dr. Dennis Lau, Earl Bakken Electrophysiology Scholarship from the University of Adelaide; 2006-2007.
    20. Mr. Paul De Sciscio, National Heart Foundation of Australia Vacation Scholarship; November 2007 – February 2008.
    21. Ms. Yanzhenzi Dai, School of Molecular and Biomedical Sciences Vacation Scholarship, University of Adelaide; November 2007 – February 2008.
    22. Ms. Yuen Hei Kwok, Undergraduate Health Science Research Vacation Scholarship, University of Adelaide; November 2007 – February 2008.
    23. Ms. Rachel Dreyer, National Heart Foundation of Australia Vacation Scholarship; November 2007 – February 2008.
    24. Mr. Christopher Wong, National Heart Foundation of Australia Vacation Scholarship; November 2007 – February 2008.
    25. Mr. Ross Roberts-Thomson, Bachelor of Medical Science, First Class Honours, University of Adelaide.
    26. Mr. Ross Roberts-Thomson, Undergraduate Faculty of Health Science Research Vacation Scholarship, University of Adelaide, November 2007 – February 2008.
    27. Mr. Ross Roberts-Thomson, Florey Honors Bachelor of Medical Science Scholarship. Florey Foundation.
    28. Mr. Ross Roberts-Thomson, Royal Adelaide Hospital Research Committee Honors Scholarship.
    29. Dr. Dennis Lau, National Heart Foundation of Australia Travel Grant to attend the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand Annual Scientific Sessions, Christchurch, New Zealand.
    30. Dr. Martin Stiles, National Heart Foundation Travel Grant to attend the Heart Rhythm Society Annual Scientific Sessions, Denver, Colorado, USA.
    31. Dr. Bobby John, Pfizer Australia Travel Grant to attend the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand Annual Scientific Sessions.

    2006

    1. Prof. Prash Sanders, NHMRC New Investigator Project Grant; 2006-2008.
    2. Prof. Michael James, NHMRC Project Grant; 2006-2008.
    3. Prof. Prash Sanders, NHF Grant-in-Aid; 2006-2007.
    4. Dr. Scott Willoughby, NHF “J” Trust Award.
    5. Dr. Mathias Baumert, ARC Discovery Project; 2006-2008.
    6. Dr. Mathias Baumert, FECMS grant improvement scheme.
    7. Prof Prash Sanders, Top Ranked Grant-in-Aid. National Heart Foundation of Australia.
    8. Dr. Bobby John, Young Investigator Award (First Prize), Asia-Pacific AF Symposium, Tokyo, Japan.
    9. Dr. Martin Stiles, Best Moderated Poster in the Drugs/Ablation/Electrical Therapy of Arrhythmias section at the World Congress of Cardiology and European Society of Cardiology, Barcelona, Spain.
    10. Mr. Kelvin Wong, Young Investigator Award (First Prize) at the International Conference on Mechanics in Medicine and Biology, Singapore, Singapore.
    11. Dr. Martin Stiles, St Jude Medical Young Investigator Award.
    12. Dr. Lorraine Mackenzie, Peter-Doherty Fellowship from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia; 2006-2007.
    13. Dr. Martin Stiles, Dawes Scholarship from the Royal Adelaide Hospital; July 2006 – June 2008.
    14. Dr. Bobby John, Biosense-Webster Electrophysiology Scholarship from the University of Adelaide; 2006-2009.
    15. Mr. Christopher Wong, Undergraduate Faculty of Health Science Research Vacation Scholarship, University of Adelaide; November 2006 – February 2007.
    16. Mr. Ross Roberts-Thomson, Summer Research Scholarship from the National Heart Foundation of Australia; November 2006 – February 2007.
    17. Mr. Ross Roberts-Thomson, Summer Research Scholarship from the National Heart Foundation of Australia; November 2006 – February 2007.
    18. Dr. Martin Stiles, Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand Travelling Scholarship, European Society of Cardiology Congress, Barcelona, Spain.
    19. Dr. Martin Stiles, Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand Annual Scientific Meeting Travelling Scholarship, Canberra.
    20. Dr. Martin Stiles, New Zealand Heart Foundation Travel Grant, Heart Rhythm Society Annual Scientific Sessions, Boston, USA.

    2005

    1. Dr. Martin Stiles, Overseas training fellowship (Ranked Number 1) from the National Heart Foundation of New Zealand; July 2005 – June 2006.
    2. Mr. Pawel Kuklik, COST P10 program scholarship, European Union; July 2005 – September 2005.

    2004

    1. Dr. Kurt Roberts-Thomson, Medical Postgraduate Research Scholarship from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia; 2004-2007.
    2. Mr. Chrishan Nalliah, Summer Research Scholarship from the National Heart Foundation of Australia; November 2004 – February 2005.
    3. Prof Prash Sanders, Victorian Premiers Award for Medical Research (Commendation), Victorian Premiers Office, Melbourne, Australia.
    4. Mr. Chrishan Nalliah, AMA JG Hunter Fellowship, Australian Medical Students Association.
    5. Prof Prash Sanders, Heart Rhythm Society Clinical Research Award. NASPE Heart Rhythm Society, 25th Annual Scientific Sessions.