New training centre to advance future quantum tech

Almost $5 million has been awarded in funding to a training centre led by the University of Adelaide which will provide technical and leadership skills to the next generation of quantum technology leaders in biology, engineering, and physics.

Purple Chip

Photonic chips (like the one pictured) will be combined with quantum materials by the CE-QuTech team to achieve real-world impact with our industrial partners.

Almost $5 million has been awarded in funding to a training centre led by the University of Adelaide which will provide technical and leadership skills to the next generation of quantum technology leaders in biology, engineering, and physics.

With an investment of $4,869,032 from the Australian Research Council (ARC) Industrial Transformation Research Program, the University of Adelaide is leading a consortium along with RMIT University and the University of Queensland to deliver this project.

Professor Glenn Solomon from the School of Physics, Chemistry and Earth Sciences will direct the new ARC Training Centre in Current and Emergent Quantum Technologies (CE-QuTech).

The University’s Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Vice President (Research), Professor Anton Middelberg, says the training centre will play a critical role in advancing Australia’s position as a global leader in quantum technologies.

“The University of Adelaide is world renowned for its research in quantum materials and quantum technologies. The establishment of this new CE-QuTech marks a significant milestone in advancing cutting-edge science and technology,” Professor Middelberg says.

“This funding will empower Australian researchers to pioneer breakthroughs in quantum technology, and drive innovation and economic growth. Our leadership in developing skilled professionals in this field will ensure Australia remains at the forefront of global technological advancements.”

Professor Solomon says that there are exciting economic opportunities and implications for what is seen as “the second quantum revolution”, yet Australia needs to be prepared.

“There is a predicted shortfall in the skilled and leadership workforce necessary to keep pace with this change, let alone capitalise on the opportunity for Australia to be a world presence in this space,” he says.

“In addition, industry leaders big and small are clamouring for skilled workers in current quantum technology. Many in the industry are seeking an expanding skilled workforce in current quantum technologies, from automotive electronics and lighting to telecommunications lasers.

“The CE-QuTech will help meet this need by supplying graduate students and post-doctoral researchers across Australia with hands-on training in both an academic and an industrial research setting.”

“The outcomes of training quantum technology leaders in areas touching engineering, physics, and biology will broadly shape the future high-technology landscape. The centre will attract and enable investment, leveraging our existing ecosystem and strengthening economic security in Australia."Professor Glenn Solomon, The School of Physics, Chemistry and Earth Sciences, The University of Adelaide

In close collaboration with universities and industry members, and with strategic guidance, the new training centre addresses the advancements needed in Australia as these technologies grow world-wide at an accelerated pace.

“The outcomes of training quantum technology leaders in areas touching engineering, physics, and biology will broadly shape the future high-technology landscape. The centre will attract and enable investment, leveraging our existing ecosystem and strengthening economic security in Australia,” Professor Solomon says.

Professor Arnan Mitchell from RMIT University says: “I am excited to work with the whole CE-QuTech team to show how our photonic chips can be combined with quantum materials to create new solutions for industry - from wireless sensors that can work underwater to Australian made lasers that we can export to the world.”   

Associate Professor Jacqui Romero from the University of Queensland says: “This new collaboration between the University of Queensland, University of Adelaide and RMIT University is a great opportunity to leverage on each of our research strengths. We look forward to delivering relevant training for the future workforce of the quantum industry.”

Dr Richard Johnson, ARC Acting Chief Executive Officer, says Research Hubs and Training Centres funded under the ARC’s Industrial Transformation Research Program support and foster industry-university research collaboration in areas capable of driving innovation in Australian industries and developing industry-focused researchers.

“The breadth and reach of the industrially focused research effort being funded through the program is significant for Australia,” Dr Johnson says.

Tagged in featured story, quantum, Australian Research Council