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A glimpse into the past: what digging for DNA in cave dirt tells us about ancient Australia?

Sediment layering at Blanche Cave, Naracoorte

For most people the term “ancient DNA” might conjur up images of Jurassic Park, where DNA extracted from a mosquito preserved in amber was used to re-create long extinct dinosaurs.

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2024 SA Environment Awards Success

2024 SA Environment Awards EI Dr Isobelle Onley, Dr Katja Hogendoorn, Professor Sean Connell and Dr Dominic McAfee

Yesterday, on World Environment Day, we celebrated the 2024 SA Environment Award finalists and winners. The evening was a fantastic celebration of environmental champions across the state, emceed by the charismatic Tiahni Adamson. 

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Tropical fish are invading Australian ocean water

Tropical fish are invading Australian ocean water

A University of Adelaide study of shallow-water fish communities on rocky reefs in south-eastern Australia has found climate change is helping tropical fish species invade temperate Australian waters.

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Strengthening Australia and Vietnam partnerships: Advancing research and understanding on designing and operating high integrity blue carbon market

Strengthening Australia and Vietnam partnership

Vietnam, with its long coastline, is vulnerable to climate change impacts.

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Early career marine ecologist wins Southwood Prize

Dr Dominic McAfee

Congratulations to Environment Institute Future Making Fellow, Dr Dominic McAfee, on winning the 2023 Journal of Applied Ecology Southwood Prize for the best paper by an early career researcher.

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SciStarter Australia is a new home for citizen science

SciStarter Australia app in use

Citizen science platform SciStarter Australia has officially launched on the final day of Global Citizen Science month, creating a one-stop location for citizen science projects seeking volunteers in Australia.

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Murray-Darling Basin water theft laws suck more than river irrigation pumps

Murray-Darling Basin

Water is one of Australia’s most valuable commodities. Rights to take water from our nation’s largest river system, the Murray-Darling Basin, are worth almost A$100 billion. These rights can be bought and sold or leased, with trade exceeding A$2 billion a year. But water is also being stolen (no-one knows how much) and the thieves usually get away with it.

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Defining the potential for mangrove-based agribusiness transformation in the coastal Mekong Delta, Vietnam

Project kick off meeting

The Mekong Delta region in Vietnam is facing several development challenges but the Government of Vietnam (GoV) is committed overcoming these and support the growth of the agricultural sector in the region. The Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR) recently awarded Environment Institute’s Future Making Fellow, Dr Pham Thu Thuy, $471,200 for a project on ‘Defining the potential for mangrove-based agribusiness transformation in the coastal Mekong Delta’.

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Scientists seek your soil for century-chemical study

Scientists seek your soil for century-chemical study

University of Adelaide researchers are calling on South Australian citizen scientists to donate soil samples from their backyard gardens for a study examining how widely spread per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are in our home gardens.

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Adelaide is losing 75,000 trees a year. Tree-removal laws must be tightened if we want our cities to be liveable and green

Adelaide

Large areas of concrete and asphalt absorb and radiate heat, creating an “urban heat island effect”. It puts cities at risk of overheating as they are several degrees warmer than surrounding areas.

[Read more about Adelaide is losing 75,000 trees a year. Tree-removal laws must be tightened if we want our cities to be liveable and green]

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