SOCI 2012 - Social Research

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2019

The aim of Social Research is to develop students' knowledge and understanding of research - how and why it is done - and to expose students to different theoretical perspectives and methodologies employed by researchers in conducting social research. Students will learn new skills: formulating a research question; designing a survey and interview schedule; participant observation; conducting focus groups; content analysis and discourse analysis; and interpreting information. Students will also be taught about ethical considerations in social research and how the research findings inform change. Students will also learn how these research skills are increasingly and widely applicable in the workplace.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code SOCI 2012
    Course Social Research
    Coordinating Unit Gender Studies and Social Analysis
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites At least 12 units of Level I undergraduate study
    Incompatible GWSI 2015, GWSI 2110, GWSI 3015, GSSA 2110
    Course Description The aim of Social Research is to develop students' knowledge and understanding of research - how and why it is done - and to expose students to different theoretical perspectives and methodologies employed by researchers in conducting social research. Students will learn new skills: formulating a research question; designing a survey and interview schedule; participant observation; conducting focus groups; content analysis and discourse analysis; and interpreting information. Students will also be taught about ethical considerations in social research and how the research findings inform change. Students will also learn how these research skills are increasingly and widely applicable in the workplace.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Djordje Stefanovic

     
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes

    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

    Understand the purpose of social research and its potential to investigate contemporary social issues through both quantitative and qualitative approaches.

    Identify the range of methods, techniques and skills used in contemporary social research and their capacity to solve specific social problems.

    Demonstrate skills in social science methods including the ethical and practical aspects of researching social problems, critical reading, reflection and analytical writing.

    Work with others in the exploration of ideas and to collectively develop arguments and negotiate solutions to problems.

    Undertake a research project including formulating a research problem and its key questions

    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1,2,3
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    2,3,4,5
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    4
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    1,2,3,4,5
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    2,3,4
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    3,4,5
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Investigating the Social World (9th edition) by Russell K. Schutt, Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE, 2019.
    - Etext version available online at https://au.sagepub.com/en-gb/oce/investigating-the-social-world/book254625#description
    - Hardcopy available at the Barr Smith Library, High Use area.

    Recommended Resources
     
    Online Learning
    Lecture power point slides, on-line quizzes, assignment instructions, and model assignments will be posted to the MyUni course site available via MyUni link.

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    No information currently available.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

     
    1 x 3 hour lecture per week                              36 hours

    2.5 hours reading per week                              30 hours

    1 hour on-line quiz answering per week           12 hours

    5.5 hours assignment
    preparation each week on average                  66 hours

    1 hour exam review per week                          12 hours


    Total (per semester)                                       156 hours




     

    Learning Activities Summary

    No information currently available.

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task                                               Due Date                                    Weight                          Learning Objectives

    10 On-line Quizzes (Not
    required, Bonus points, 1% each)                       Weekly                                         10%                                      1,2,3,4

    Midterm Exam                                                     26 March                                       15%                                     1,2,3

    Assignment One (Prospectus)                             2 April                                           10%                                     1,2,3,5

    Assignment Two (Single Study Review)               2 May                                           15%                                     1,2,3

    Assignment Three (Literature Review)                6 June                                           30%                                     1,2,3,5

    Final Exam                                                           TBA                                               30%                                     1,2,3






































































    Assessment Detail


    5.2.1          Ten On-line Quizzes (10%)                                                             DUE: Day Before a Specified Class

    The quizzes will consist of a set of multiple choice questions that will test your comprehension of the readings required for the following day’s lecture. The quizzes are due on the MyUni by 10 pm on the day before the lecture. (For example, the quiz one that deals with Chapter 2 is due by 10 pm on March 6, and the Chapter 2 will be discussed in class on March 7.) Late submissions will not be accepted. For the specific days when the quizzes are available as well as the relevant readings to be tested by the quizzes, please see the 4.3. Tentative Course Calendar above.

    The quizzes will be graded. Each will be worth 1% of your final course grade. The quizzes are not required. If you decide to do them, the marks you get will be added to your course grade. For example, if you get 72% (C) and add 3 % extra from the quizzes, you final grade in the course will become 75% (D). A final course grade above 100% will be rounded as High Distinction (HD).

    The purpose of the on-line quizzes is to give you an additional incentive to stay on top of your readings and to give you some early indication how well you are doing in the course. Moreover, the quizzes will enable me to identify specific textbook materials which are difficult to understand for the majority of students in the course. I will then pay more attention to those materials in my lectures. (In order to have time to adjust the lecture content, I need to have the quiz results by 10 pm.) Since the format and the difficulty of the quizzes will be similar to the mid-term exam and the final exam questions, the quizzes will also help you to prepare for them. Finally, at least 25% of the questions that will appear at the mid-term exam and the final exam will come from the quizzes.

     
    5.2.2.        Mid-Term Exam (15%)                                                                                                                     Due: March 26

    The mid-term will be multiple choice and will include the kinds of questions asked in the quizzes. It will take place in the regular class time and location on March 26. Details of this assessment will be provided in the class on March 19.

    5.2.3.        Assignment One (Prospectus) (10%)                                                                                          DUE: April 2

    The prospectus is the first step towards producing your state-of-art literature review. It should be no longer than 1 page in length
    (plus 1-2 pages of bibliography) and should briefly outline your research question, your theoretical rationale, and 8 relevant academic sources you propose to review. It is particularly important to justify your proposed research question as interesting and worth answering. Details of this assessment will be provided in the class on March 12.

    5.2.4.        Assignment Two (Single Study Review) (15%)                                                                         DUE: May 2

    In the second assignment, you will apply your new methodological skills to analyze an assigned study, and to identify its main strengths and weaknesses. The study to be analyzed will be made available at the MyUni. Details of this assessment will be provided in the class on April 2.

    5.2.5.      Assignment Three (Literature Review) (30%)                                                                            DUE: June 6

    In this assignment you will do a thorough literature/theory review, addressing a topic of your choice. The Literature Review will be up to 10 pages long, double spaced, 12 pt Times New Roman, 1-inch margins. As a critical review of the “state of knowledge” on your topic, it will allow you to situate your research question as having the potential to add to or correct an existing theory, thereby helping us to understand the phenomena in question.  For this reason, it is crucial to find proper academic sources to review.

    A literature review is not simply a list of the research on a topic, nor is it merely a summary of the arguments others have made concerning a topic. A literature review is an essay which allows you to survey the field as it is, with an eye to the contribution that
    you will make to the literature through your research question. Therefore, you should be particularly attentive to the questions that are unanswered (or unasked) in the literature, the theoretical concepts in the field which are inadequate, the errors that exist in our current ways of looking at the topic, and so on.

    You should begin to conduct your review of the literature with a question that is as specific as possible, knowing that it will change as you interact with the literature. By the time you write your literature review, your research question should be carefully formulated in researchable terms. Details of this assessment will be provided in the class on May 2.

     
    5.2.6.        Final Exam (30%)                                                                                                                               DATE: TBA

    You will be expected to display understanding, integration, and critical reflection on the required readings and lectures. The examination will have a multiple choice format. Details of this assessment will be provided in the class on June 6.

    Note: Further information on the expectations for the Prospectus, the Single Study Review, and the Literature Review will be provided at the MyUni and discussed in class.
    Submission
    Online submission of all assignments


    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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