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2016 new memberships

This year the RRI was accepted as members of three new associations. These memberships will help to progress our world leading research through increased collaboration and opportunities.

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Platypus venom could hold key to diabetes treatment

Australian researchers have discovered remarkable evolutionary changes to insulin regulation in two of the nation’s most iconic native animal species – the platypus and the echidna – which could pave the way for new treatments for type 2 diabetes in humans.

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Making babies in the 21st century – let’s talk about sex!

The RRI hosted the public forum Making babies in the 21st Century – Let’s talk about sex!

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Bed, birth and beyond

Yesterday, the RRI co-hosted a GP training session in collaboration with Fertility SA at Adelaide Oval titled Bed, Birth and Beyond: Women’s health, conception, pregnancy and further.

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Winter conception increases mum’s diabetes risk

Research led by the University of Adelaide has found that women whose babies are conceived in winter are more likely to develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy, increasing a range of risk factors for both child and mother.

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Suppressing the immune system won’t improve your chances of conceiving with IVF

Author: Sarah Robertson

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Drug shows promise for preventing preterm birth

Professor Sarah Robertson

Researchers from the University of Adelaide have successfully tested a drug that is showing some early promise in efforts to prevent pre-term birth.

[Read more about Drug shows promise for preventing preterm birth]

Introduce eggs and peanuts early in infants’ diets to reduce the risk of allergies

In the 1970s, when we were in school, food allergies were rare. But Australian children now have the highest rate of food allergy in the world. Up to one in ten infants and two in ten school-aged children have a proven food allergy.

[Read more about Introduce eggs and peanuts early in infants’ diets to reduce the risk of allergies]

Could assisted reproduction reduce birth defects for older women?

Professor Michael Davies

Babies born to women aged 40 and over from assisted reproduction have fewer birth defects compared with those from women who conceive naturally at the same age, according to new research from the University of Adelaide.

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Watch video: The short and long-term implications of late preterm and early term birth

Professor Jonathan Morris presented the third in the series of Robinson Research Institute / Women’s and Children’s Hospital co-hosted Grand Rounds on the topic: The short and long-term implications of late preterm and early term birth.

[Read more about Watch video: The short and long-term implications of late preterm and early term birth]

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