ENV BIOL 3009 - Ecophysiology of Plants III

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2016

This course explores interactions between plants and their environment from a physiological perspective. It will consolidate and extend knowledge of the processes involved in the acquisition and transport of resources by plants and use this knowledge to examine the ways plants have adapted to a range of environments, some of which can be considered as extreme. The course will also look at how plants respond to environmental challenges such as climate change, ozone depletion, salinisation and heavy metal toxicity. Interactions with other organisms will also be examined including mycorrhizas and parasitic plants. Practical work will include small group experiments. Details of field trip communicated at start of the course.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code ENV BIOL 3009
    Course Ecophysiology of Plants III
    Coordinating Unit School of Biological Sciences
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 6 hours per week, plus field trip
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Assumed Knowledge ENV BIOL 2500
    Course Description This course explores interactions between plants and their environment from a physiological perspective. It will consolidate and extend knowledge of the processes involved in the acquisition and transport of resources by plants and use this knowledge to examine the ways plants have adapted to a range of environments, some of which can be considered as extreme. The course will also look at how plants respond to environmental challenges such as climate change, ozone depletion, salinisation and heavy metal toxicity. Interactions with other organisms will also be examined including mycorrhizas and parasitic plants. Practical work will include small group experiments.
    Details of field trip communicated at start of the course.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr John Goodfellow

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes


    On successful completion of this course students should be able to:

    1.     Explain the concepts of plant resource acquisition, plant energy budgets and plant water relations and plant to symbionts and          parasite interactions.

    2.     Explain how these concepts help understand ecological systems with a particular focus on the South Australian context.

    3.     Acquire then demonstrate the skills to design and undertake experiments in the laboratory and in the field using cutting edge  
            analytical equipment.

    4.     Work collaboratively to undertake experiments in the laboratory and in the field, produce written reports and deliver oral reports.

    5.     Collect, analyse interpret and present field data in the format of a peer reviewed scientific report as well as discuss the finding in the context of the current literature.

    6.     Demonstrate confidence in self-directed learning through the production and presentation of a lecture topic.

    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 2, 3
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    5
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    4, 6
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    3
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    4, 6
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Course Handbook
    Recommended Resources
    Text books:
    Taiz & Zeiger (2010) Plant Physiology. 5th ed. Sinauer Assoc. Mass, USA

    Lambers, Chapin, & Pons (2008) Plant Physiological Ecology. 2nd ed. Springer-Verlag, New York, USA

    These texts are available for purchase from UniBooks or Encompass Books. There are copies of each in the Barr-Smith Library Reserve Collection.  In addition, the Lambers et al. text is available as an ebook online through the library catalogue.
    Online Learning
    MyUni:   
    Teaching materials and course documentation will be posted on the MyUni website (http://myuni.adelaide.edu.au/). 

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The course consists of lectures, practicals, a field camp and oral presentations. The practicals and field camp are designed to complement and reinforce material presented in lectures, and to provide students with experience of data collection, analysis, and report writing. Students will also develop skills with laboratory and field-based techniques commonly used in the discipline of Plant Ecophysiology. 

    A range of teaching methodologies will be used, including traditional lectures as well as lectures prepared and presented by students in small groups.  Laboratory-based practicals and a field-based project will be undertaken in groups of 3 to 4 students promoting the collaborative approach to science. Students are strongly encouraged to attend the field camp which will operate over three days in the second week of the mid-semester break.  Students will be expected to participate in peer assessment of group oral presentations of the lectures and field camp reports.



    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    A student enrolled in a 3 unit course, such as this, should expect to spend, on average 12 hours per week on the studies required. This includes both the formal contact time required to attend the course (e.g., lectures and practicals), as well as non-contact time (e.g., reading and revision).
    Learning Activities Summary
    Schedule
    Week 1 Lecture
    Lecture
    Practical
    Abiotic Stress 1 – Salinity
    Abiotic Stress 2 – Acid soils
    Prac 1: Abiotic Stress Week 1
    Week 2 Lecture
    Lecture
    Practical
    Abiotic Stress 3 – Heavy metals
    Plant and Soil Analysis
    Prac 1: Abiotic Stress Week 2
    Week 3 Lecture
    Lecture
    Practical
    Plant Stress – Light 1
    Plant Stress – Light 2
    Prac 2: Light Acclimation Week 1
    Week 4 Lecture
    Lecture
    Practical
    Photosynthesis – C4
    Photosynthesis - CAM
    Prac 2 Light Acclimation Week 2
    Week 5 Lecture
    Lecture
    Practical
    Parasitic Plants – Physiology
    Parasitic Plants – Ecological roles
    No practical
    Week 6 Lecture
    Lecture
    Practical
    Water Relations 1
    Water Relations 2
    Prac 3: Water Relations Week 1
    Week 7 Lecture
    Lecture
    Practical
    Transpiration: leaf, stem and root
    Transpiration: cavitation & embolism
    Prac 3: Water Relations Week 2
    Week 8 Lecture
    Lecture
    Practical
    Energy Budgets in leaves 1
    Energy Budgets in leaves 2
    Field Trip planning
    Mid-semester break Field Camp
    Week 9 Lecture
    Lecture
    Practical
    Mycorrhizas: Structure and function
    Mycorrhizas: Ecological impacts
    Field Trip Review
    Week 10 Lecture
    Lecture
    Practical
    Plant Respiration 1
    Plant Respiration 2
    Field Trip report
    Week 11 Lecture
    Lecture
    Practical
    Global Change: Rising CO2
    Global Change: Climate change
    Field Trip report DUE
    Week 12 Lecture
    Lecture
    Practical
    Global Change: UV

    Specific Course Requirements
    All students must attend the 3-day Field Camp to Brookfield Conservation Park.  The field camp will be held in the mid-semester break.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Hurdle Weighting Learning Outcome Approximate Timing of Assessment
    Practical reports (3) Formative/Summative No 30% 1, 9,10 Weeks 1-7
    Field Trip report Formative/Summative No 15% 1, 8-10 Week 11
    Group Field Trip Oral Presentation Formative/Summative No 5% 9-13 Weeks 11 & 12
    Group Lecture Topic Presentation


    Formative/Summative   

    No

    10%

    9-13 Weeks 9, 10 & 11
    Exam Summative

    No

    40% 1-7 Sem 2 Exam Period
    Assessment Detail
    Practical 1 will be submitted in the form of a consultant’s report and submitted individually. Practicals 2 & 3 and the field camp report are to be prepared as if you were submitting a scientific paper to the journal New Phytologist. Practicals 2 and 3 are submitted individually. The field trip report is submitted in groups of 3-4.

    A 10 min oral presentation based on the field trip report will be prepared by the group members that undertook the field based report and presented to the class in the lecture time in week 10. Peer assessment will contribute to the
    grade for this task.

    A 15 min oral presentation prepared and delivered by groups of 3-4 students in the form of a lecture and chosen from a list of topics provided to the class will be delivered in the lecture times in weeks 11 and 12. Peer assessment will contribute to the grade for this task.



    Submission
    Practical Reports and the Field Camp Report are to be submitted by midnight on the due date.

    All Reports are to be submitted electronically in MyUni using the Turnitin Assignments feature.

    Extensions for Assessment Tasks
    Extensions of deadlines for assessment tasks may be allowed for reasonable causes.  Such situations would include compassionate and medical grounds of the severity that would justify the awarding of a replacement examination.  Evidence for the grounds must be provided when an extension is requested.  Students are required to apply for an extension to the Course Co-ordinator before the assessment task is due.  Extensions will not be provided on the grounds of poor prioritising of time. 


    If an extension is not applied for, or not granted then a penalty for late submission will apply. 
    A penalty of 10% of the value of the assignment for each calendar day that is late (i.e. weekends count as 2 days), up to a maximum of 50% of the available marks will be applied.  This means that an assignment that is 5 days or more late without an approved extension can only receive a maximum of 50% of the mark.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.