MANAGEMT 7081PT - Managing in a Global Context

North Terrace Campus - Trimester 3 - 2015

This course will prepare you for a leadership role in the globalised world. It provides an overview of the diversity and complexity of the global environment and how that environment affects local, national and international organisations. It introduces core theories and frameworks that guide systematic thinking about aspects of economic, institutional, and cultural diversity across and similarity between countries that matter in the context of managing a contemporary organisation. It will help you to develop a managerial global mindset and acquire skills to leverage this diversity and similarity for value creation in the organisational context. You will learn to identify challenges and opportunities brought about by globalisation, generate insights necessary to manage them successfully, and build skills needed to become a successful leader in the global environment.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code MANAGEMT 7081PT
    Course Managing in a Global Context
    Coordinating Unit Business School
    Term Trimester 3
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Restrictions Restricted to Certificate, Grad Dip and Master of Business Administration students only.
    Course Description This course will prepare you for a leadership role in the globalised world. It provides an overview of the diversity and complexity of the global environment and how that environment affects local, national and international organisations. It introduces core theories and frameworks that guide systematic thinking about aspects of economic, institutional, and cultural diversity across and similarity between countries that matter in the context of managing a contemporary organisation. It will help you to develop a managerial global mindset and acquire skills to leverage this diversity and similarity for value creation in the organisational context. You will learn to identify challenges and opportunities brought about by globalisation, generate insights necessary to manage them successfully, and build skills needed to become a successful leader in the global environment.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Olga Muzychenko

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes


    1.              
    Identify and explore the practical impact of existing diversity in
    cultural, political, legal and economic systems on the behaviour of different
    actors operating in the global economy and its effect on business activities in
    both local and international contexts

    2.              
    Devise and apply effective
    communication, collaboration and consultation strategies to engage, support and
    manage  stakeholders of diverse
    backgrounds in order to achieve organisational outcomes

    3.              
    Understand, compare and contrast
    strategies that may be used by a firm to seize opportunities and manage
    challenges presented by globalisation of the world economy and international
    business operations

    4.              
    Analyse and interpret  the process of internationalisation of an
    enterprise to contribute to decisions about the internationalisation of an
    organisation

    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 1-4
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 1,2,4
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 1,2
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 1-4
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Course materials pack: Readings and case studies Course materials posted on MyUni: Case studies, lecture notes, exercises, and library links to readings.
    Recommended Resources
    Books:
    Bartlett, C.A. & Ghoshal, S. 1989. Managing across borders: The transnational solution. Harvard Business School, Boston, Mass.
    Cavusgil,T., Knight, G. and Riesenberger, J. 2011. International business. 2nd edition. Prentice Hall.
    Doz, Y., Santos, J. and Williamson, P. 2001. From Global to Metanational: How Companies Win in the Knowledge Economy, Harvard Business School Press
    Dunning, J.H. 1993. Multinational Enterprises and the Global Economy, Addison Wesley.
    Fukuyama, F. 1992. The end of history and the Last Man. New York: Free Press.
    Ghemawat, P. 2007. Redefining global strategy: Crossing borders in a world where differences still matter. Harvard Business School Publishing.
    Ghemawat, P. 2011.World 3.0: Global Prosperity and How to Achieve It. Harvard Business School Publishing.
    Hill, Charles (2013), International Business, 9th ed, McGraw Hill International.
    Huntington, S. P. 1996. The clash of civilizations and the remaking of the world order. New York: Simon and Schuster.
    Johansson, J. 2008. Global marketing: Foreign entry, local marketing, and global management. McGraw Hill/Irwin.
    Khanna, T. and Palepu, K. 2010. Winning in Emerging Markets: A Road Map for Strategy and Execution . Harvard Business School Publishing.
    Lasserre, P. and Schutte, H. 2006, Strategies for Asia Pacific: Meeting new challenges, Macmillan Business, Sydney.
    Lewis, R. (2006). When cultures collide: Managing successfully across cultures. Nicolas Brealey Publishing, London
    Ohmae, K. 1990. The Borderless World, Harper Business Press.
    Porter, M.E. 1986. Competition in global industries. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.
    Porter, M.E. 1990. The competitive advantage of nations. The Free Press, New York.
    Rugman. A. 2001. The end of globalisation: Why global strategy is a myth and how to profit from the realities of regional markets. Amacom.
    Sen, A. 1999. Development as freedom. New York: Alfred A. Knopf.
    Stace, D. 1997. Reaching out from Down Under: Building competence for global markets. McGraw- Hill, Sydney.
    Trompenaars, F., and Hampden-Turner, C. (1997). Riding the Waves of Culture, Nicholas Brealey, London.
    Trompenaars, F., and Hampden-Turner, C. (2001). Building Cross-cultural competence: How to create wealth from conflicting values . New York: John Wiley and Sons.
    Trompenaars, F., and Hampden-Turner, C. (2004). Managing people across cultures. Chichester: Capstone.
    Trompenaars, F., and Hampden-Turner, C. 2004. Managing people across cultures. Chichester: Capstone.
    Walker, D., Walker, T. And Schmitz, J. 2003. Doing business internationally. 2 ed. McGraw-Hill
    Warner, M. (ed) 2003. Culture and management in Asia. Routledge Curzon.
    Yip, G. 2011, Total Global Strategy, 3rd ed, Prentice Hall- Pearson Education International.
    Zeng, M. & Williamson, P.J., 2008. Dragons at your door: How Chinese cost innovation is disrupting global competition. Harvard Business School Press.


    Online Learning
    In preparation for each lecture please visit MyUni course site www.myuni.adelaide.edu.au to access course materials. The lecturer’s PowerPoint files and other relevant material for each session will be posted on MyUni weekly. Power point lecture notes offer both a summary of important material and some supplementary information. MyUni will also be used be the lecturer to post important messages.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The course uses a mixture of readings, experiential exercises, and case studies.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The University expects full-time students (i.e. those taking 12 units per semester)
    to devote a total of 48 hours per week to their studies.  This means that you are expected to commit
    approximately 9 hours in preparation for each 3 hour face to face session. This
    includes preparation for classes and working on assignments.
    Learning Activities Summary

    Topic 1: Understanding global business context .
    Reference
    material: Course Materials and MyUni: Topic 1.

    Topic 2:  Skills
    and competencies for managing in a global context.
    Reference material: Course Materials and MyUni: Topic 2.
    Case study

    Topic 3: Cultural differences in behaviour and
    mindsets.
    Reference material: Course Materials and MyUni:  Topic 3.
    Case study

    Topic 4: Cultural differences in leadership
    and  decision-making.
    Reference material: Course Materials and MyUni : Topic 4.
    Case studies


     Topic 5: Internationalisation
    of a firm: Creating value in a global context
    Reference material: Course Materials and MyUni: Topic 5.
    Case study


     Topics 6:  Identifying international opportunities  
    Reference material: Course Materials and MyUni: Topic 6
    Case study


    Topic 7: Identifying international opportunities:
    Understanding emerging markets 
    Reference material: Course Materials and MyUni: Topic 7
    Case study


    Topic 8  Internationalisation as entrepreneurial
    activity. International entry strategic decisions.
    Reference material: Course Materials and MyUni: Topic 8.
    Case study


    Topic 9: Internationalisation of Services.
    International outsourcing .
    Reference material: Course Materials and MyUni: Topic 9.
    Case studies


    Topic 10: Team management and conflict resolution across
    cultures. Ethics in a global context.
    Reference material: Course materials and MyUni: Topic 10
    Case studies




    Topic 11. Negotiating in a global context.
    Reference
    material: Course materials and MyUni: Topic 11
    Case study




    Group presentations (Company project). Course wrap up.




  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assignment 1: Individual Country Project Report


    Assignment 2: Group Company Project (Report)
    Assignment 2: Group Company Project (Presentation)


    Assignment 3: Individual Reflection Report


    Class participation


    In-class test







    Assessment Detail

    No information currently available.

    Submission

    No information currently available.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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