ARTH 5212EX - Studies in Japanese Art

External - Semester 1 - 2014

The online course encompasses the history of Japanese Art and a study of its distinctive culture and aesthetics. It focuses via the online environment around works in the collection of the Art Gallery of South Australia, including major works of sculpture, screen painting, wood-block prints, ceramics and metalwork including Shinto and Buddhist sculptures, ukiyo-e prints by Hiroshige, Hokusai and others, sword mounts of the Samurai and ceramics by Shoji Hamada and his circle. Attention will also be focused on issues surrounding the intersection between Japanese and Western Art.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code ARTH 5212EX
    Course Studies in Japanese Art
    Coordinating Unit History
    Term Semester 1
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s External
    Units 6
    Contact Online
    Restrictions Available to ProCertArtHist, GradCertArtHist, GradDipArtHist, MA(StArtHist) & MA(Cur&MuseumSt) students only
    Course Description The online course encompasses the history of Japanese Art and a study of its distinctive culture and aesthetics. It focuses via the online environment around works in the collection of the Art Gallery of South Australia, including major works of sculpture, screen painting, wood-block prints, ceramics and metalwork including Shinto and Buddhist sculptures, ukiyo-e prints by Hiroshige, Hokusai and others, sword mounts of the Samurai and ceramics by Shoji Hamada and his circle. Attention will also be focused on issues surrounding the intersection between Japanese and Western Art.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Professor Catherine Speck

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    not offered in 2015
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    At the successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
    1 Demonstrate overview knowledge of Japanese art
    2 Demonstrate awareness of key historical, aesthetic and theoretical issues in Japanese art
    3 Demonstrate the ability to fluently describe composition, style, and iconography in both written and oral exposition.
    4 Develop "connoisseurship"
    5 Develop critical thinking in methodological, historical and theoretical problems
    6 Develop problem solving skills
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1, 2
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 3, 5, 6
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 5
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 4
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 5
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 4
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 2
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    · Course Handbook – distributed prior to the first tutorial
    · Course Reader – distributed prior to the first tutorial
    Recommended Resources
    · Recommended text (available at the Art Gallery of South Australia bookshop or online booksellers)
    · Lecture and tutorial images (on PowerPoint)
    · Barr Smith Library Resource Guide:
    · http://www.adelaide.edu.au/library/guide/hum/history/art.html
    Online Learning
    Course materials will be available on MyUni
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The lectures provide broad discussion of selected topics relevant to the history of Japanese Art, which are complemented by focused tutorial case studies centred on oral presentations and group discussion of the prescribed tutorial readings and images.

    The lectures are delivered online as audio narrated presentations and are posted on MyUni a week prior to the evening virtual tutorial.

    The Gallery sessions will be delivered by Curators at Art Gallery of South Australia. All sessions will be presented as online video clips and podcasts which will be embedded with MyUni for viewing asynchronously.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The course is composed of eight weeks of audio narrated university lectures (1 hour, 10 minutes) and tutorials (1.5 hours) as well as 4 weeks of gallery art video sessions (2 hours). Students are required to complete the weekly tutorial readings in advance of the tutorials and complete additional reading for their assessment tasks.
    Learning Activities Summary

    Schedule
    Week 1 Introduction to AGSA’s Japanese art collection
    Week 2 Online presentation: Course overview: Terminologies and concepts
    Week 3 Online presentation: Defining the Japanese aesthetic: from Heian to Momoyama
    Week 4 Buddhist art as an expression of salvation
    Week 5 Cross cultural influences on Japanese art
    Week 6 The Art of Tea
    Week 7 Rise of Edo urban culture
    Week 8 Art of Esoteric Buddhism
    Week 9 Japanese Screens: documents of reality and fantasy
    Week 10 Bakumatsu and Meiji Era: Pre-modern to Modern Japan
    Week 11 Modern art movements in Japan 1912-1945
    Week 12 Post world War II: The emergence of Mono-ha 1945-1970
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment task Task type    Weighting Learning outcome
    Artefact Review Formative and Summative 15% 1-6
    Visual Analysis Task Formative and Summative 15% 1-6
    Tutorial Presentation Formative and Summative 10% 1-6
    Tutorial Essay Formative and Summative 20% 1-6
    Research Essay Formative and Summative 40% 1-6
    Assessment Related Requirements
    There are four components to the assessment, which must all be submitted to pass. The due dates for assessment are treated as examination dates. Requests for extension stating the reason for the extension must be sent to your tutor for approval in advance of the due date and supplemented by a hard-copy Extension Request form available on MyUni that must be signed off by both student and tutor.
    Assessment Detail
    Artefact review (1000 words) From the exhibition catalogue The Golden Journey: Japanese Art from Australian Collections select any two works of interest to you which are of different media (e.g. a painting & a carving). Briefly describe each work’s iconography and function. Together, what differing traditions of Japanese art do they reflect and what do you consider to be their ‘Japanese’ qualities. Weighting: 15%

    Tutorial (oral) presentation: Topics are listed under the weekly university tutorials in the Course Guide and will be allocated at the University tutorial in the first week of semester. You are required to give an oral presentation to your tutorial group with a view to generating discussion and receiving feedback for the tutorial essay. Weighting: 10%

    Class Paper (2,500 –3,000 words): At the first tutorial or at the online on-campus induction day, you will be asked to choose a tutorial topic and week in which you will present this paper online via Elluminate classroom. Relevant works of art are to be included in this 10-minute online presentation to the virtual class based on the key points of your written paper. Your tutorial paper is due one week after the presentation. Weighting: 30%

    Visual analysis task (1,000 words): At the end of the course your knowledge of some of the key images covered during the lectures and gallery sessions will be tested by a visual analysis task comparing and contrasting one of the three pairs of Japanese artworks. Weighting: 15%

    Research Essay (3,000 –3,500 words): Research essay topics are based on key themes discussed in the course. Weighting: 40%
    Submission
    All assignments are to be submitted electronically via MyUni.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

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