MANAGEMT 7086 - Fundamentals of Leadership

North Terrace Campus - Trimester 1 - 2021

"To lead is to live with danger. Although it may be exciting to think of leadership as inspiration, decisive action, and powerful rewards, leading requires taking risks that can jeopardize your career and your personal life. It requires putting yourself on the line, disturbing the status quo, and working with organizational and political conflicts. Those who choose to lead take the risks and sometimes are neutralized for doing so." Ronald A Heifitz An essential skill of leadership in our time is the ability to work with people to tackle challenges and changes which are not only technical in nature but which require people (including ourselves) to change. In Fundamentals of Leadership, we will identify the challenges of leadership in the second decade of the 21st Century. We will explore habitual responses to many modern challenges and identify why they often do not work (John Kotter, a leading scholar on Change suggests that around 75% of change initiatives fail). We will explore other responses and use the classroom to help us to understand the role of culture, systems, authority and leadership in people-based change. Positioned at the beginning of the MBA, Fundamentals of Leadership encourages you to think about the nature of what you will study over the whole Program. It also encourages you to explore and develop personal skills central to leadership. By exploring self-awareness, and developing a personal leadership philosophy students will be well placed to broaden their understanding of other individuals and social groups at work.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code MANAGEMT 7086
    Course Fundamentals of Leadership
    Coordinating Unit Adelaide Business School
    Term Trimester 1
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 36 hours
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange
    Restrictions Available to Certificate, Grad Dip and Master of Business Administration students only.
    Course Description "To lead is to live with danger. Although it may be exciting to think of leadership as inspiration, decisive action, and powerful rewards, leading requires taking risks that can jeopardize your career and your personal life. It requires putting yourself on the line, disturbing the status quo, and working with organizational and political conflicts. Those who choose to lead take the risks and sometimes are neutralized for doing so." Ronald A Heifitz

    An essential skill of leadership in our time is the ability to work with people to tackle challenges and changes which are not only technical in nature but which require people (including ourselves) to change. In Fundamentals of Leadership, we will identify the challenges of leadership in the second decade of the 21st Century. We will explore habitual responses to many modern challenges and identify why they often do not work (John Kotter, a leading scholar on Change suggests that around 75% of change initiatives fail). We will explore other responses and use the classroom to help us to understand the role of culture, systems, authority and leadership in people-based change.

    Positioned at the beginning of the MBA, Fundamentals of Leadership encourages you to think about the nature of what you will study over the whole Program. It also encourages you to explore and develop personal skills central to leadership. By exploring self-awareness, and developing a personal leadership philosophy students will be well placed to broaden their understanding of other individuals and social groups at work.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Chad Habel

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes

    At the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:

    1. Distinguish between leadership and strategic leadership, identify examples of the practice of strategic leadership and reflect on the effectiveness in specific contexts.

    2. Identify, diagnose and analyse key business systems in the workplace from a leadership perspective and redesign these systems to maximise people and business performance.

    3. Undertake a process of professional leadership transformation through the development of a wide array of strategic leadership skills.

    4. Gain and develop insights on self and others in a workplace context and ask deep, probing questions and provide courageous feedback to colleagues that helps them to learn.

    5. Identify, source, evaluate, interpret and analyse both primary and secondary data to inform the leadership of a change initiative.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    CLO 1,2,5
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    CLO 1,2,3,5
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    CLO 1,2,3,4
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    CLO 1,2,3,4,5
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    CLO 1,2,3,4,5
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    CLO 4
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Rainey, D 2014, Full-Spectrum Strategic Leadership, Information Page Publishing, USA.

    In addition to the textbook, there will be a range of readings provided in MyUni to reflect the theoretical and applied perspectives of strategic leadership.
    Recommended Resources
    D’Souza S & Renna D 2014, Not knowing: The art of turning uncertainty into opportunity, LID, London.

    Heiftez RA, Linsky M & Grashow A 2009, The practice of adaptive leadership, Harvard Business Review Press, Boston, Massachusetts.

    Students may wish to read more widely in specific subject areas, something that the Business School wholeheartedly encourages. There are many general texts on management and leadership, and on managerial skills that students may find useful.

    Perhaps of greatest assistance though are readings from leading academic journals, current business journals and the better newspapers. Relevant journals include:

    • Academy of Management Journal (USA)
    • Academy of Management Review (USA)
    • Administrative Science Quarterly (USA)
    • Australian Journal of Public Administration
    • California Management Review
    • Harvard Business Review (USA)
    • Journal of Management and Organisation
    • Journal of Conflict Resolution
    • Journal of Management
    • Leadership Quarterly
    • Personnel Psychology (USA)

    Full texts of a great many of the articles that appear in these journals can be accessed via the University of Adelaide’s library databases (Business Source Complete is recommended: http://web.a.ebscohost.com.proxy.library.adelaide.edu.au/ehost/search/advanced?vid=0&sid=83494a09-40f6-4d71-87ed-57eff51786e4%40sessionmgr4006).

    There are numerous references at the conclusion of each set reading which will supplement your learning of particular topics. We will point out additional articles on various topics for those who are inspired to delve more deeply during the course.
    Online Learning
    MyUni is used extensively in this course in a blended learning format, meaning that it is an important aspect of your learning prior to and in between your formal class activities. The most important information for your daily engagement with the course can be found on MyUni, especially information relating to your prepartion for each class and your assignment information. MyUni is also where you will submit all your assignments and receive your feedback and grades on them. You should get in the habit of visiting MyUni several times a week for updates and activities.

    Also, important communications will be transmitted both via MyUni and to your student email addres, so please ensure you check your student email regularly or set up a reliable forwarding system to your primary email address.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    We have ‘taught’ FOL and other Leadership courses for many years and we have both gone through a learning process as we have worked with many groups in Adelaide, Singapore and Hong Kong as well as in Executive Education and in many companies, not-for-profit organisations and governments. We realised a long time ago that leadership cannot be taught – at least not in the traditional way that we think about teaching. There are two distinctly different types of learning: one is informational – about stuff that you need to know – and the other is transformational – about your thinking and your sense-making. For us leadership requires some information giving, but transformational learning is the key.

    So, if leadership cannot be taught why have a core course called ‘Fundamentals of Leadership’ in the MBA? The answer to that is good news for all of us: Leadership can be learned and all of us have daily opportunities to learn as we interact with people at all levels in and beyond our organisations. We see and experience what works and we see and experience what doesn’t work in many different human interactions. Whether we take note of our thinking, whether we consider our stereotypes and biases as we experience human interactions is another question.

    Our aim in FOL is to help you to learn by crafting a course that enables you to surface and challenge your thinking and your approach to leadership. We want you to ponder and reflect on leadership generally and your own experience in particular. We want you to have many conversations about leadership and hear and tell many stories – with your FOL colleagues, people at work, family and friends: people you meet formally and people you meet informally. We want you to read widely and critically about leadership and think about its application to your own context. Most importantly we want you to intentionally and mindfully make some decisions about your own approach to leadership and present your thinking through a series of assignments.

    Our purpose in this course is your learning. You will learn what you are ready and able to learn at this time, although students also report that learning continues well after the course finishes. For some the course is challenging – both the style of teaching and the workload. Our request is that you ‘hang in there’ – much of what we do becomes clear over time; we read many final assignments which say ‘I just got it… or I think I have…’: there is learning from the heart as well as in the head and this sometimes takes time to work through. ‘Presence’ and ‘mindfulness’ are important aspects of this course, and, we would suggest of leadership in any context. The Chade-Meng Tan Youtube clip explores the concept of mindfulness.

    In the FOL intensives we will try to have as little traditional ‘teaching’ as possible. So if you don’t read / watch in advance you may find it challenging to follow the discussion and you may compromise your own learning. This will become increasingly apparent to us in your assignments throughout the course.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.


    This is a standard ‘3 Unit’ MBA course which requires about 156 hours of student effort. These 156 hours includes the time spent in  class, working in your groups and undertaking assessment as well as reading and  assignment preparation. You could well find yourself engaged in thinking and practicing what you are learning for many more hours.

    Hopefully as you become familiar with the adaptive leadership framework you will discover that quantifying learning in this way is a rather technical approach.  When it comes to the more aspirational forms of learning we hope to facilitate, your mileage may vary.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Please see MyUni for details on intensive and workshop content.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary

    Assessment Task Task Type Weighting Learning Outcome
    Part A: Individual Case Study Individual n/a (formative) 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9
    Part A: Consultation Report 1 Individual 15% 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,9
    Part A: Consultation Report 2 Individual 15% 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,9
    Part B: Company Sustainability Strategy Video Group 10% 3,6,8
    Part B: Sustainability Summit Collaborative 20% 3,6,8,9
    Part C: Final Individual Report Individual 40% 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,9
    For further information please see MyUni.
    Assessment Related Requirements
    For assessment information please visit MyUni.
    Assessment Detail
    For assessment information please visit MyUni.
    Submission
    All assessments are to be submitted via MyUni.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.