MANAGEMT 7104NA - Marketing Management

Ngee Ann Academy - Quadmester 2 - 2017

Marketing lies at the core of all business. Whatever the character or size of your entity, its profit can come from only one place; the marketplace. All businesses are dependent on the income they earn from their customers, clients or buyers. In most larger businesses it is marketing managers who are primarily responsible for keeping their company close to its customers. In any case, all those who have a direct responsibility for identifying, reaching and satisfying customers are engaged in marketing and everybody in a business needs to understand its marketplace activities. This course offers a complete introduction to professional marketing thought and action. The course explains the nature and purpose of marketing, followed by the fundamentals of each of the most important marketing tasks. It analyses the business need for customer orientation, the evaluation of markets and the targeting of market opportunities. There is then assessment of buyer behaviour and the role of market information. In addition, the course explains how to integrate product and service decisions with those on pricing, distribution and promotion - and why this is necessary.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code MANAGEMT 7104NA
    Course Marketing Management
    Coordinating Unit Business School
    Term Quadmester 2
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s Ngee Ann Academy
    Units 3
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Restrictions Restricted to Certificate, Grad Dip and Master of Business Administration students only.
    Course Description Marketing lies at the core of all business. Whatever the character or size of your entity, its profit can come from only one place; the marketplace. All businesses are dependent on the income they earn from their customers, clients or buyers. In most larger businesses it is marketing managers who are primarily responsible for keeping their company close to its customers. In any case, all those who have a direct responsibility for identifying, reaching and satisfying customers are engaged in marketing and everybody in a business needs to understand its marketplace activities. This course offers a complete introduction to professional marketing thought and action.
    The course explains the nature and purpose of marketing, followed by the fundamentals of each of the most important marketing tasks. It analyses the business need for customer orientation, the evaluation of markets and the targeting of market opportunities. There is then assessment of buyer behaviour and the role of market information. In addition, the course explains how to integrate product and service decisions with those on pricing, distribution and promotion - and why this is necessary.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Svetlana De Vos

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Interpret complex marketing issues and problems using relevant theories, concepts and methods with regard to ethical conduct.
    2. Apply contemporary marketing theories to the demands of business and management practice.
    3. Find and generate information/data needed to inform problem solving in marketing using appropriate methodology.
    4. Analyse information/data critically and synthesise new knowledge and communicate that knowledge via engaging written and oral formats.
    5. Organise information and data to reveal patterns and themes, and manage teams and evidence gathering and problem solving processes.
    6. Conduct the process of inquiry, and respond to feedback, accounting for ethical, social and cultural (ESC) issues.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1,2,6
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    3,4,5
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    3,4,6
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    2,3,4,5,6
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    1,6
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    1,2,4,6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Text Book: Kotler, P. And Keller, K. L. (2016) Framework for Marketing Management, Global edition 6e, Pearson, New Jersey. ISBN 9781292093147 (or other appropriate text)
    Readings: See Course Materials - Assigned reading material has been provided to generate greater depth of understanding on particular topics and may be discussed during class sessions. It is likely that this material will provide useful examples and references during assessment.
    Recommended Resources
    Readings

    Session 1: Comstock; B., Gulati; R., Liguori S. (2010), ‘Unleashing the Power of Marketing’ Harvard Business Review, Oct, Vol.88(10), p.90(9); Rust, R.T., Moorman, C., and Balla, G. (2010) ‘Rethinking Marketing’. Harvard Business Review, Jan-Feb, 94-101

    Session 2: Dawar, N. (2013) 'When Marketing Is Strategy',Harvard Business Review December, 3-10.
    Van Den Dries, F., Sthanunathan S, Weed K. (2016) ‘Building an Insights Engine: How Unilever got to know its customers’ Harvard Business Review Sept., 64-74

    Session 3: Morey, T., Forbath T., Schoop, A., (2015) ‘Customer data: Designing for transparency and trust.’
    Harvard Business Review, May, 97-105; Horst, P., and Duboff R., (2015) ‘Don’t Let Big Data Bury Your Brand: What Capital One learned about over-relying on analytics’ Harvard Business Review, October, 79-86

    Session 4: Almquist, E., Senior, J., and Block, N. (2016) ‘The elements of value: Measuring - and delivering - what consumers really want.’ Harvard Business Review, Sept, 3-9.; Yankelovich, D., and Meer, D. (2006) ‘Rediscovering market segmentation’. Harvard Business Review, February, 122-131.

    Session 5: Edelman, D.C. (2010) ‘Branding in the Digital Age’ Harvard Business Review, December, 62-69.
    Magids S., Zorfas A., and Leemon D., (2015) ‘The New Science of Customer Emotions: A better way to drive growth and profitability’ Harvard Business Review, Nov 67-76.

    Session 6: Christensen, C. M., Hall, T., Dillon, K., Duncan, D.S. (2016) ‘Know Your Customers’ “Jobs to Be Done” Is innovation inherently a hit-or-miss endeavor? Not if you understand why customers make the choices they do.’ Harvard Business Review, Sept. 54-62;
    Mark, T., Niraj R., Dawar N. (2012), ‘Uncovering Customer Profitability Segments for Business Customers’
    Journal of Business-to-Business Marketing, 19:1–32 

    Session 7: Holt, D. ( 2016) ‘Branding in the Age of Social Media’ Harvard Business review, March, 41- 50
    Dawar, N., &. Bagga, C., K. (2015); ‘A Better Way to Map Brand Strategy’, Harvard Business Review, June, 91-97

    Session 8: Gourville, J., T. ‘Eager Sellers & Stony Buyers: Understanding psychology of new product adoption.’ ( 2006) Harvard Business Review, June 99-106

    Session 9:  Bertini, M., and Wathieu, L. (2010) ‘How to stop customers from fixating on price’, Harvard Business Review, May 2010, 84-91

    Session 10: Wong, H. Y.; Radel, K., Ramsaran-Fowdar, R. (2011) Building a Marketing Plan:Planning for Distribution Channels and Market Logistics, Harvard Business Publishing, Jan., 128-142; Retail Free Riding: The Case of the Wallpaper Industry
    Doane, M. J., Farris, P.W., Kucuk, S. U.,  Maddux, R.C.The Antitrust Bulletin, 2013, Vol.58(1), pp.129-158

    Session 11: Anderson, J. C., Narus J.A., Van Rossum, W. (2006) ‘Customer value proposition in business markets.’Harvard Business Review, March, 91-99;John L. K., Mochon, D., Emrich O., Schwartz J., What’s the value of a like? Social media endorsements do not work the way you might think (2017) Harvard Business Review, March, 108 – 115

    Session 12:Shankar, V., Berry, L.L., and Dotzel, T. (2009) ‘A practical guide to combining products and services’ Harvard Business Review, November, pp. 95-99.;   Pernice, M., (2016) Revolutionizing Customer Service: Dramatic turnarounds require counterintuitive strategies. Harvard Business Review April, 26-27;  Kumar, V., Bhagwat, Y., and Zhang X. (2016), ‘Winning back Lost Customers: How to target and appeal to the most likely’ returnees’. Harvard Business Review, Mar 22-23

    Cases 

    Case 1 "Unleashing The Power Of Marketing," Harvard Business Review
    Case 2 "EILEEN FISHER: Repositioning the Brand", Harvard Business Review
    Case 3 "The EpiPen: This is Going to Sting," Harvard Business Review
    Case 4 "Can Retailers Win Back Shoppers Who Browse then Buy Online?", Harvard Business Review
    case 5 "Bank of America: Mobile Banking (Abridged)", Harvard Business Review 
    Case 6 "WestJet: A new social media strategy", Harvard Business Review 
    Case 7 "Local Motors: Designed by the Crowd, Built by the Customer", Harvard Business Review
    Case 8 "Mountain Dew: Selecting New Creative", Harvard Business Review
    Case 9  "Hamilton Won More Than Twitter", Harvard Business Review
    Case 10 "The Walt Disney Studios", Harvard Busness Review
    Online Learning
    Course Website: www.myuni.adelaide.edu.au

    “ADAPT” FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE
    ADAPT (Any Device, Any Place and Time) allows staff and students to access their learning and teaching applications on personal devices: desktops, laptops, tablets and smart phones, anywhere:

    • On campus via the UofA wireless network; and
    • Off campus via broadband access and 3G/4G Mobile networks.

    Through this “virtual suite” you will be able to use a range of licensed software products (i.e., Statistical Package for the Social Sciences)

    Details for ADAPT can be found at:

    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/technology/yourservices/learning-teaching/adapt/
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Seminars consist of lectures, in-class practical activities and case study presentations. The presentation of case study material seeks to develop a detailed understanding of material covered in lectures. We will also strongly support the face to face work with digital content through the MyUni platform.
    This will include:
    • Broadcast Emails
    • Powerpoints
    • Readings and Case Studies all posted online
    • Lecture recordings on video
    • Feedback on assignments – PDF of assignment rubric & email/Zoom feedback
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The two weekends consist of around 36 hours contact time. You can expect to spend about the same amount of time preparing for these classes. Assignments and exam preparation will demand additional concentrated periods of non-classroom study, on your own or with your allocated student group. As a rough indication, you could expect to spend in the order of 120 hours of study time to complete the course, of which 36 hours would be in class.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Time Activity Topic Text Reading
    Friday May 12, 2017
    7.00 pm – 8.20 pm 
    Session 1 Understanding
    marketing
      Ch 1 Comstock; B., Gulati; R., Liguori S. (2010), ‘Unleashing the Power of Marketing’ Harvard Business Review, Oct, Vol.88(10), p.90(9)
    Rust, R.T., Moorman, C., and Balla, G. (2010) ‘Rethinking Marketing’. Harvard Business Review, Jan-Feb, 94-101.
    8.30 pm – 10.00 pm Session 2 Marketing Strategies and Plans Ch 2 &
    18
    Dawar, N. (2013) When Marketing Is Strategy
    Harvard Business Review December, 3-10.
    Van Den Dries, F., Sthanunathan S, Weed K. (2016) ‘Building an Insights Engine: How Unilever got to know its customers’ Harvard Business Review Sept., 64-74
    Saturday May 13, 2017
    1 pm – 1.50 pm  
    Session 3 Market Research and Analysis Ch 3 Morey, T., Forbath T., Schoop, A., (2015) ‘Customer data: Designing for transparency and trust.’
    Harvard Business Review, May, 97-105
    Horst, P., and Duboff R., (2015) ‘Don’t Let Big Data Bury Your Brand: What Capital One learned about over-relying on analytics’ Harvard Business Review, October, 79-86
    2.00 pm -3.00pm
    In – class activity: Practicing Qualitative techniques.
    3.00 pm – 4.20 pm   Session 4 Connecting with customers: Building customer value, satisfaction and loyalty; Segmentation and Targeting Ch 4 & 6 Almquist, E., Senior, J., and Block, N. (2016) ‘The elements of value: Measuring - and delivering - what consumers really want.’ Harvard Business Review, Sept, 3-9.
    Yankelovich, D., and Meer, D. (2006) ‘Rediscovering market segmentation’. Harvard Business Review, February, 122-131.
    4.30 pm – 5.00 pm Break
    5.00 pm – 6.20 pm  
    Session 5 Consumer Behavior Ch 5 Edelman, D.C. (2010) ‘Branding in the Digital Age’ Harvard Business Review, December, 62-69.
    Magids S., Zorfas A., and Leemon D., (2015) ‘The New Science of Customer Emotions: A better way to drive growth and profitability’ Harvard Business Review, Nov 67-76.
    6.30 pm – 8.00 pm In – class activity: Consumer behavior exercise

    Sunday May 14, 2017
    9.00 am – 10. 30 am
    Session 6 Buyer Behavior in B&B context. Segmenting business markets Ch 5 & 6 Christensen, C. M., Hall, T., Dillon, K., Duncan, D.S. (2016) ‘Know Your Customers’ “Jobs to Be Done” Is innovation inherently a hit-or-miss endeavor? Not if you understand why customers make the choices they do.’ Harvard Business Review, Sept. 54-62
    Mark, T., Niraj R., Dawar N. (2012), ‘Uncovering Customer Profitability Segments for Business Customers’
    Journal of Business-to-Business Marketing, 19:1–32
    10. 30 am – 11.00 am  Case Study Students Conducting Unleashing the Power of Marketing

    11. 00 am – 12.30 pm  Session 7 Building Brands Ch 7& 8 Holt, D. ( 2016) ‘Branding in the Age of Social Media’ Harvard Business review, March, 41- 50
    Dawar, N., &. Bagga, C., K. (2015)
    ‘A Better Way to Map Brand Strategy’, Harvard Business Review, June, 91-97
    12.30 pm – 1.00 pm Lunch
    1.00 pm – 1.30 pm
    Case:' EILEEN FISHER: Repositioning the Brand' (Students conducting)
    1.30 pm - 2.30 pm  Session 8 Product Mix and new offerings Ch 9 Gourville, J., T. ‘Eager Sellers & Stony Buyers: Understanding psychology of new product adoption.’ ( 2006) Harvard Business Review, June 99-106
    2.30 pm – 4.00 pm New product design: in-class activity
    Friday June 16, 2017
    7.00 pm – 8.00 pm


    Welcome back & Session 9 Pricing Strategy Ch 11 Bertini, M., and Wathieu, L. (2010) ‘How to stop customers from fixating on price’, Harvard Business Review, May 2010, 84-91
    8.00 pm – 8.30 pm Case: 'The EpiPen: This is Going to Sting' (Students conducting)
    8.30 pm – 10.00 pm Conjoint analysis practicum
    Saturday June 17, 2017
    1.00 pm – 2.30 pm
    Session 10 Distribution strategy: Delivering value Ch
    12 & 13
    Wong, H. Y.; Radel, K., Ramsaran-Fowdar, R. (2011)Building a Marketing Plan:  Planning for Distribution Channels and Market Logistics, Harvard Business Publishing, Jan., 128-142
    Retail Free Riding: The Case of the Wallpaper Industry
    Doane, Michael J ; Farris, Paul W ; Kucuk, S. Umit ; Maddux, Robert C,The Antitrust Bulletin, 2013, Vol.58(1), pp.129-158
    2.30 pm- 3.00 pm Case: 'Can Retailers Win Back Shoppers Who Browse then Buy Online?' (Students conducting)
    3.00 pm - 4.30 pm  Session 11 Promotion Strategy- Communicating value Ch 14, 15, 16,
    17
    Anderson, J. C., Narus J.A., Van Rossum, W. (2006) ‘Customer value proposition in business markets.’Harvard Business Review, March, 91-99.
    John L. K., Mochon, D., Emrich O.,Schwartz J., What’s the value of a like? Social media endorsements do not work the way you might think (2017) Harvard Business Review, March, 108 – 115
    4.30 pm – 5.00 pm Break
    5.00 pm – 7.00 pm
    Marketing Communication: in – class activity (advertisement presentation and discussion)
    7.00 pm - 7.30 pm  Case: 'Bank of America: Mobile Banking (Abridged)'(Students conducting)
    7.30 pm – 8.00 pm Case:'WestJet: A new social media strategy' (Students conducting)
    Sunday June 18, 2017
    9.00 am – 10.30 am 
    Session 12 Service Marketing Ch 10 Shankar, V., Berry, L.L., and Dotzel, T. (2009) ‘A practical guide to combining products and services’ Harvard Business Review, November, pp. 95-99.
    Pernice, M., (2016) Revolutionizing Customer Service: Dramatic turnarounds require counterintuitive strategies. Harvard Business Review April, 26-27
    Kumar, V., Bhagwat, Y., and Zhang X. (2016), ‘Winning back Lost Customers: How to target and appeal to the most likely’ returnees’. Harvard Business Review, Mar 22-23
    10. 30am – 11.00am Case: 'Local Motors: Designed by the Crowd, Built by the Customer' (Students conducting)
    11.00 am – 12.30 pm Voice of the consumer practice: in class activity
    12.30 pm – 1.00 pm Lunch
    1. 00 pm – 1.30 pm

    Case: 'Mountain Dew: Selecting New Creative' (Students conducting)
    1.30pm – 2.00 pm Case:'Hamilton Won More Than Twitter' (Students conducting)
    2.00 pm – 2.30pm Case:'The Walt Disney Studios'(Students conducting)
    2.30 pm – 4.00 pm Course Wrap Up: Core concepts learned; Briefing for group course assignment; Exam tips
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment    Date Weight Basis Related Learning Outcome
    Assignment 1: Participation  Visit 1 and Visit 2 5% Individual Deliver an oral presentation in a professional and engaging manners
    Evaluate and synthesise new information and existing knowledge from a multitude of sources and experience
    Participate constructively in team situations to complete tasks and meet deadlines
    Assignment 2: Case Study Visit 2 10% Group Work Presentation and Discussion.  The continuing development of good inter-personal and communication skills
    Contribute to high level management discussion
    A commitment to objectivity, intellectual inquiry and intellectual rigour
    Critically analyse case studies to derive at recommendations to address marketing issues and opportunities
    Deliver an oral presentation in a professional and engaging manner
    Participate constructively in team situations to complete tasks and meet deadlines
    Assignment 3: Company Marketing Profile Report 


    28.05.17
    Midnight, Via SafeAssign in the “Assignments” Section of MyUni
    15%  Individual Interpret complex marketing issues and problems using relevant theories, concepts and methods;
    Prepare professional, logical and coherent written marketing reports;
    Apply contemporary marketing theories to the demands of business and management practice;
    An understanding of trends in the political, economic, technological, social and cultural environments within which businesses operate.
    Assignment 3: Company Marketing Advice Report  02.07.17
    Midnight, Via SafeAssign in the “Assignments” Section of MyUni
    25% Group work
    Final Exam: 2 hours open book 08.07.17
    Details TBA
    45% Individual Evaluate and synthesise new information and existing knowledge from a multitude of sources and experiences

    Critically analyse exam questions to derive at recommendations to address marketing issues and opportunities
    Assessment Detail
    Assignment 1- Participation in class discussions and in-class activites ( Individual Grade - 5%)

    Assignment 2 - Case Study Presentation and Discussion (Group Grade 10%)
    A group of students will briefly present an assigned case, outline relevant questions and facilitate the related discussion. Full details of the cases assigned to be covered are contained in the Topic Schedule. The focus of each session should be on topics covered earlier in the course, and should draw on as much theory as possible.

    Presenting students will be expected to (1) provide a brief summary of the case, the relevant environment and issues arising from the case, (2) Provide answers to the case questions for discussion, and (3) give their considered points of view as part of a facilitated discussion of all students in the class. All students should come prepared and be able to take part in the discussion of issues that arise in the course of the case discussion. The presenting students will facilitate discussion among the class to further explore the question and thinking related to formulating an answer to case discussion questions. If required, the lecturer will add additional questions and support facilitation of the relevant discussion. This discussion is a key part of developing the learning and thinking required for the learning objectives of this course and the graduate attributes. Importantly this is the beginning of developing knowledge into thinking and skills required for decision making in marketing areas.

    Assignment 3: Company Marketing Profile Report (Individual grade 15%)
    In 1500 words, using a company/product/brand with which you are familiar (your employer for example) you are required to prepare a Marketing Profile Report. Use a business report format (executive summary, table of contents, appendices). Using the learning from Sessions 1-4 you will need to critically assess the organisation/product/brand and its environment and address:
    1. Who appears to be the company's customer?
    2. What is the customer's need and how is that need being satisfied by the company.
    3. Provide a brief environmental scan for your company and indicate opportunities and threats
    4. Provide an outline of how your company would apply the five step market research process
    5. Utilise your answers to questions 1-4 to derive recommendations for the company/product/brand.

    Assignment 4 – Company Marketing Advice (Group Grade 25%)
    3000 words – table of contents, appendices and tables are excluded from a word count.
    Students will be formed into pairs and will act as a consultants to the company of your choice. You can choose to consult to one of the companies you covered in assignment 2, or a completely new one.
    As a pair, you are required to provide marketing advice to your client. This is loosely in the form of a marketing plan and needs to follow the rubric as given below.
    Each week’s lecture and discussion content builds to assist you in creating this piece of marketing advice.
    The Marketing Environment
    The marketing environment consists of external forces that directly or indirectly influence an organisation’s acquisition of inputs (human, financial, natural resources and raw materials, and information) and creation of outputs (goods, services, or ideas).
    SWOT Analysis
    One tool marketers use to assess an organisation’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats is the SWOT analysis.
    Strengths and weaknesses are internal factors that can influence an organisation’s ability to satisfy its target markets.
    Opportunities and threats exist independently of the organisation and therefore represent issues to be considered by all organisations, even those that are not competitors.
    Marketing Objectives
    A marketing objective states what is to be accomplished through marketing activities.
    Marketing goals should be based on a careful study of the SWOT analysis and should relate matching strengths to opportunities and/or convert weaknesses and threats.
    Marketing Strategy
    The next phase in strategic planning is the development of strategies for each functional area of the organisation.
    Within the marketing area, a strategy is typically designed around two components: (1) the selection of (a) target market segment(s) and (2) the creation of a marketing mix that will satisfy the needs of the chosen target market.
    Implementing Marketing Strategies
    Marketing implementation is the process of putting marketing strategies into action.
    Controlling Marketing Activities
    The formal marketing control process includes the establishment of performance standards, evaluation of actual performance by comparing it with established standards, and reduction of differences between desired and actual performance.

    Do:
    • Present the case in report format with subheadings and paragraphs following a logical structure.
    • Use tables, diagrams and further analysis of data to clarify, illustrate and supplement analysis and support your recommendations.
    • Use page numbers and 1½ spacing for ease of reading and feedback.
    • Use citations from original sources when they are used, using an accepted format such as Harvard. If sources have not been acknowledged, they will be considered as plagiarised!
    • Proof read your reports thoroughly, for grammatical and spelling errors.
    Do not:
    • (DO NOT) Use bullet points unless you are simply presenting a list which is self explanatory. Bullet points do not lend themselves to discussion and explanations.
    • (DO NOT) Copy material or use ideas from other sources without acknowledging the source. Failure to acknowledge the source will be interpreted as plagiarism which is a serious offence.
    • (DO NOT) Use SWOT analysis as the only form of analysis - this is a good starting point but you will need to go much further using the concepts from the course as the framework. You may summarise the SWOT analysis in a diagram or a table and briefly explain it in the body of the report.









    Submission
    Presentation of Assignments
    • Please must retain a copy of all assignments submitted.
    • All assignments must be submitted electronically through the MyUni assignments portal
    • Please attach an ‘Assignment Cover Sheet’, which is signed and dated by you before submission.
    • All group assignments must be attached to a ‘Group Assignment Cover Sheet’, which must be signed and dated by all group members before submission. All team members are expected to contribute approximately equally to a group assignment.
    • Lecturers can refuse to accept assignments which do not have a signed acknowledgement of the University’s policy on plagiarism.

    No Resubmission
    Once your paper is in, it’s in. You can’t take your assessed paper, rework it and resubmit it.

    Late Assignment Submission
    Students are expected to submit their work by the due date to maintain a fair and equitable system. Extensions will generally only be given for medical or other serious reasons. All requests for extensions must be emailed to the lecturer in charge before the due date. Each request will be assessed on its merits. A late assignment (without prior arrangement) will be penalised (One day late 10% discounted;Two days 20% discounted;Three or more days 50% discounted).


    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.