EUST 1000 - Modern Imagination in Europe

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2014

This course introduces students to the expression of the modern condition in major nineteenth- and twentieth-century works of European prose, poetry, and the visual arts. Each of the works/artistic movements is representative, in both its form and content, of the modern predicament. We will explore such themes as realism, nihilism, absurdism, the boredom and alienation of urban life, fascism, the Holocaust, existentialism and new modes of representation. In the visual arts, we will be looking at French impressionism, German expressionism, cubism and abstractionism, and New Wave cinema. We will be reading classic works such as Camus's The Outsider, Flaubert's Madame Bovary and Kafka's The Trial. In poetry, we will be studying Baudelaire's Flowers of Evil, and a selection of Surrealist and Holocaust poems.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code EUST 1000
    Course Modern Imagination in Europe
    Coordinating Unit French Studies
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Course Description This course introduces students to the expression of the modern condition in major nineteenth- and twentieth-century works of European prose, poetry, and the visual arts. Each of the works/artistic movements is representative, in both its form and content, of the modern predicament. We will explore such themes as realism, nihilism, absurdism, the boredom and alienation of urban life, fascism, the Holocaust, existentialism and new modes of representation. In the visual arts, we will be looking at French impressionism, German expressionism, cubism and abstractionism, and New Wave cinema. We will be reading classic works such as Camus's The Outsider, Flaubert's Madame Bovary and Kafka's The Trial. In poetry, we will be studying Baudelaire's Flowers of Evil, and a selection of Surrealist and Holocaust poems.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Professor John West-Sooby

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On the completion of the Modern Imagination in Europe, students will be able to:
    1. understand and appreciate some of the key ideas and artistic, literary and philosophical movements coming out of Europe that guided the nineteenth and twentieth centuries
    2. analyse texts, films and other artistic productions, and communicate information, ideas and arguments about them with more accuracy, coherence and sophistication, in both spoken and written modes, using a range of appropriate technologies and resources
    3. locate and evaluate a variety of sources to further their own understanding of European culture
    4. organise and analyse information appropriate to the study of European culture
    5. work both independently and in collaboration with others in the exploration, generation and presentation of ideas and information, and contribute productively and in a timely manner to group-based outcomes
    6.develop a commitment to the rigorous application of scholarly principles in the exploration of questions relating to the cultural productions of Europe
    7. work independently to improve their knowledge and understanding of the societies and cultural
    productions of Europe
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1, 2
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 3, 4
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 5
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 5
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 2
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 7
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    A Course Reader will be available from the Image and Copy Centre before the start of semester.  Students will also need to purchase (or borrow from the library) the following novels:

    Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary
    Franz Kafka, The Trial
    Albert Camus, The Outsider

    Recommended Resources
    The course coordinator and tutors will advise students of useful readings throughout the semester that may be used to supplement their study.
    Online Learning
    The following will be available on MyUni:
    - course outline
    - lecture powerpoints and recordings (for the majority of topics)
    - other documents, as required
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    There will be three contact hours per week. The one-hour lecture provides a general introduction to the week's topic for study. The seminar of two hours will be devoted to tasks such as textual analysis, presentations and class discussion.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    3 class hours per week 3 hours
    reading and other preparation (on average) 6 hours
    assignment preparation (essays, class presentations) 3 hours
    Average weekly workload 12 hours
    Learning Activities Summary
    For the detailed work schedule, see the Course Booklet (available on MyUni to enrolled students).
    Specific Course Requirements
    Students who do not meet the following requirement will be awarded a grade of Fail for the course:
    - a minimum of 75% attendance in all seminars
    - submission of all forms of assessment worth 10% or more during the semester
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Due date Weight Learning Outcomes
    Oral presentation Formative Week of topic 10%
    Short tests on lectures    
    (best 8 of 10)
    Summative Continuous 10%
    Essay 1 (1000 words) Formative &     
    Summative
    Friday of Week 7 20%
    Essay 2 (1200 words) Formative &
    Summative
    Friday of Week 13     25%
    Examination (2 hours) Summative Exam period 35%
    Assessment Related Requirements
    The guidelines relating to presentation, submission and assessment of work are as follows:

    1. Presentation of Work
    All work handed in during the year should be clearly labelled with the student‘s name and class and also with the name of the staff member for whom it is intended. It should be written on alternate lines (double spaced and in a font no less than 12 point, if typed), for greater clarity and to allow ample room for correction. For essay work, attention should be given to the correct setting out of quotations and bibliographical material.

    2. Deadlines
    Students are formally notified of essay deadlines well in advance of the due date. Essays handed in after the due date will incur a penalty of 5% deduction per working day late, unless an extension has been granted. Essays submitted one week or more after the due date will not be marked. Extensions will only be granted on medical grounds (medical certificate required) or in documented cases of hardship. Extensions must be requested from the Course Coordinator in advance of the due date.
    Assessment Detail
    See the Course Booklet distributed in class and available on MyUni to enrolled students for details of the assessment tasks.
    Submission
    STUDENTS MUST HAND IN THEIR WORK, IN OFFICE HOURS, TO THE SCHOOLOF HUMANITIES OFFICE ON LEVEL 7 OF THE NAPIER BUILDING (via the Assignment Box), BY MID-DAY ON THE DUE DATE TO ENSURE THAT THE DATE AND TIME OF SUBMISSION ARE STAMPED ON THE ASSIGNMENT
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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