GENMUS 2005 - Music, Media & Contemporary Society

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2014

This course offers an examination of music performance and consumption practices in contemporary society. Drawing upon a range of examples from popular music, classical music, film music, and background music, the course considers the varied aesthetic and cultural uses of music and music media. At the same time, it looks at the interconnectedness of musical practices brought about through music-oriented technology. This may be seen especially in the general impact of recording technology on all forms of music-making and consumption, but also in the business and promotional practices associated with the global music industry, and in current issues related to music copyright. Throughout the course, an emphasis will be placed on developing students' ability to critically examine and discuss aspects of musical aesthetics, behaviour, function, and meaning.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code GENMUS 2005
    Course Music, Media & Contemporary Society
    Coordinating Unit Elder Conservatorium of Music
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Incompatible GENMUS 3005; 9801, 5307, 4293 & 8324 (pre-2002)
    Assumed Knowledge No previous ability to play an instrument or read music required
    Course Description This course offers an examination of music performance and consumption practices in contemporary society. Drawing upon a range of examples from popular music, classical music, film music, and background music, the course considers the varied aesthetic and cultural uses of music and music media. At the same time, it looks at the interconnectedness of musical practices brought about through music-oriented technology. This may be seen especially in the general impact of recording technology on all forms of music-making and consumption, but also in the business and promotional practices associated with the global music industry, and in current issues related to music copyright. Throughout the course, an emphasis will be placed on developing students' ability to critically examine and discuss aspects of musical aesthetics, behaviour, function, and meaning.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Mr Steven Knopoff

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. Awareness and understanding of a wide range of contexts in which technology, commerce, and aesthetics interact in both the creation and consumption of music in contemporary society.

    2. Awareness and understanding of the extent to which the aesthetics and other meaning associated with music are influenced by the 'extra musical' contexts in which music is created and consumed.

    3. Development of music research skills related to planning essays and confidence in written and oral communication.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1, 2, 3
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 1, 2, 3
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 3
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 3
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 1, 2, 3
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 1, 2, 3
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    COURSE READER

    Music, Media & Contemporary Society involves weekly assigned readings. Each assigned reading should be read before the applicable lectures as indicated in the course profile. Students should do the assigned readings prior to the applicable lectures.

    All of the readings will be in the Course Reader, which can NOW ONLY be purchased online from
    the new Online Shop. Login to Unified and click on the Online Shop icon in the left hand side of the Home page. As soon as the course reader is printed and available, it will be published on the Online Shop where students can order and pay and then COLLECT their reader from Image & Copy Centre (level 1, Hughes Building).
    Recommended Resources
    Oxford Music Online is a portal that enables searching in Grove Music Online and other Oxford reference content in the one location. Students can access Oxford Music Online which houses Grove music online through the link on the Elder Music Library website at: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/library/about/libraries/eml/internet_resources/
    Grove music online [electronic resource] can also be located as a title search through the library catalogue.
    Online Learning
    Course documents, including in-class handouts, assigned listening and additional listening items, assignments and other information will be available in MyUni.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Lectures will address the information and aims set out in the Course Description. There are no tutorials for this course; however lectures will include opportunities for questions/answers and limited open discussion. The lectures will also involve playback of audio and video examples. The in-class audio-visual material is a key component of the course content, the consumption and understanding of which is as important as for the spoken portion of the lecture and the readings.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    In addition to the 3 contact hours per week, it is anticipated that students would spend 6-8 hours per week in reviewing lecture notes, preparing the assigned readings undertaking additional (suggested) readings and listening, revising for exams, and researching and writing the course essay.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Schedule

    The following schedule is indicative of the topics in this course. Some topics and ordering of topics may vary.
    Week 1 Introduction to the Course

    Key Concepts and Ideas for Music, Media & Contemporary Society
    Week 2 The Importance of Recorded Music

    The Global Music Industry
    Week 3 Distribution and Consumption of Recorded Music in the Digital Age
    Week 4 Music and Film
    Week 5 Music and Cartoons
    Week 6 Contemporary Uses of Traditional Music in Japan
    Week 7 Narcocorridos: Images of Modern-Day Drug Traffickers Shaped by Traditional Song Forms and Contemporary Music Media
    Week 8 Background Music
    Week 9 The Role and Meaning of Classical Music Today
    Week 10 Economics, Politics and Culture: The Future of Classical Music
    Week 11 Sound Quality in the Age of Dynamic Range Compression and Portable Music
    Week 12 Course Summary and Review
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Weighting Date Learning Outcome
    Exam #1 20% This 40-minute exam will be held during the last part of the session in Week 5 1, 2
    Exam #2 40% This 80-minute exam covering the whole semester will be held during the second half of the final class session in Week 12 1, 2
    Course Essay 40% The 2,500 word essay will be set in class in Week 7 and will be due in Week 14. 1, 2, 3
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Attendance: Active presence at 100% of the class sessions is expected. Any student who misses more than two class sessions (certified medical or prior-approved compassionate/professional absences excepted) may be excluded from exam assessment. Applications for leave should be made using the following pro-forma: http://music.adelaide.edu.au/current/handbook/Student_Leave_Form_11-11.pdf
    Assessment Detail
    Exams #1 and #2
    Both exams will involve of a combination of short answer questions (e.g., involving one or two sentence answers) and questions requiring responses from a paragraph to a page or so in length. The test and exam will assess material covered in course readings and lectures. All students are required to sit both exams at the scheduled times. No exceptions will be made except in the case of certified medical grounds. Practice questions will be distributed in the week prior to each exam.
    Note: Should you be ill on the day of an exam you should not sit the exam, both because you could infect others and because you will likely not perform at your best. Also, once you sit an exam you cannot request a supplementary on grounds of illness. You should visit a doctor and obtain a medical certificate for the day of the missed exam, as required for medical supplementaries. You should also notify the coordinator at your soonest opportunity to request a medical supplementary assessment. 

    Essay
    Students will be given a set range of topics to choose from for this essay. Each topic will allow students to compare and contrast two artists or groups of their choice in accordance with criteria explained in the essay instructions. Further information will be provided in the essay instructions, to be distributed and discussed in class in Week 7.
    Submission
    Essay submission - refer to instructions on MyUni.

    Each student must submit their essay in PDF format through the Assignments section of MyUni.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.