ASIA 1103 - Asia and the World

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2016

The course information on this page is being finalised for 2016. Please check again before classes commence.

Asia's immense impact on the world over the last 2-3,000 years has often been obscured and is rarely part of Australian common knowledge. Asia and the World provides all students, but especially those doing International Studies and Asian Studies, with a basic introduction to notions of Asia. Many things which are taken for granted as being Western, often have their origins in the East in some way. This influence extends to language, hamburgers, philosophical ideas and ways of illustrating what we see. This influence is not limited to the ancient past. Today Asian pop culture is reshaping Western pop culture and ideas and products from Asia are changing our lives in fundamental ways even if the origins are not obvious. Asia and the World highlights the irony of how reactions to Asia shaped Europe's destiny and how its inventions and ideas have been adapted by Western states and often used to then dominate Asia in the colonial period. The contemporary rise of independent Asian nation states is reviewed and contextualised and the processes which obscure Asian influence are explained. Your view of why Australian/Western history and culture are the way they are may well change the way you see the world.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code ASIA 1103
    Course Asia and the World
    Coordinating Unit Centre for Asian Studies
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Course Description Asia's immense impact on the world over the last 2-3,000 years has often been obscured and is rarely part of Australian common knowledge. Asia and the World provides all students, but especially those doing International Studies and Asian Studies, with a basic introduction to notions of Asia. Many things which are taken for granted as being Western, often have their origins in the East in some way. This influence extends to language, hamburgers, philosophical ideas and ways of illustrating what we see. This influence is not limited to the ancient past. Today Asian pop culture is reshaping Western pop culture and ideas and products from Asia are changing our lives in fundamental ways even if the origins are not obvious. Asia and the World highlights the irony of how reactions to Asia shaped Europe's destiny and how its inventions and ideas have been adapted by Western states and often used to then dominate Asia in the colonial period. The contemporary rise of independent Asian nation states is reviewed and contextualised and the processes which obscure Asian influence are explained. Your view of why Australian/Western history and culture are the way they are may well change the way you see the world.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Gerry Groot

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.



  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:
    1 Understand the significant contribution of Asian societies to western culture
    2 Critically analyse the role of material culture in shaping many value judgments, especially where these involve notions of superiority and inferiority
    3 Investigate and apply the complex notions of diffusion, competition, adaption and assimilation etc, and the apply this knowledge to specific cases studies of global change, especially as this apply to Asian influences
    4 Recognise the complexity of the writing process where it involves correctly understanding questions, setting relevant contexts, writing explicit and developed arguments, explaining how such arguments can/should be supported by invoking sources, definitions and authorities in the field, and developing conclusions
    5 Relate practical and real life examples to the theoretical concepts and explanations covered in the course
    6 Understand the nature, role and formalities of key academic conventions such as referencing
    7 Recognise, discriminate and assess the differences between well  and poorly constructed arguments and  good and poor writing
    University Graduate Attributes

    No information currently available.

  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    An Asia & the World Course Reader will be available from the Image and Copy Centre.

    Additional resources may be located on MyUni.


    Recommended Resources
    The Research Librarian for Asian Studies at the University Library: Ms Helen Attar, helen.attar@adelaide.edu.au , supports the research needs of undergraduate students.

    The Barr-Smith Library tutorials web page has been redesigned to incorporate the new interactive skills videos. See http://www.adelaide.edu.au/library/help/tutorials/
    · I have my reading list... what do I do now? (5.50 min)
    · How do I find books in the Library catalogue? (3.30 min)
    · Help! I'm not sure how to interpret my essay question (7.21min)

    Online Learning
    Lecture recordings, powerpoints, questionnaires and other materials will be posted online.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Lectures supported by problem-solving tutorials which develop lecture material.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    2 x 1-hour lectures (or equivalent) per week 24 hours per semester
    1 x 1-hour tutorial (or equivalent) per week 12 hours per semester
    6 hours reading per week 72 hours per semester
    2 hours research per week 24 hours per semester
    2 hours assignment preparation per week 24 hours per semester
    TOTAL WORKLOAD HOURS 156 hours per semester
    Learning Activities Summary
    Schedule
    Week Lecture
    Week 1 Introduction
    Western Ideas of Asia Over Time
    Week 2 Guns Germs & Steel
    Ancient Asian Diffusions
    Week 3 The Silk Roads
    Week 4 The Mongols
    Week 5 Islam and Europe
    Week 6 China & Europe’s Enlightenment
    India and the Romantics
    Week 7 Japan’s Failed Attempt at Empire 1
    Japan’s Failed Attempt at Empire 2
    Week 8 Beatniks, Hippies & the “New Age”
    Asian Ideas in Western religions
    Week 9 Mythic Origins of Martial Arts
    Asian Martial Arts
    Week 10 Asian Cultural Influence Pre-WWII
    Asian Food and Western Culture: Tea
    Week 11 Post-WWII & How Hokusai’s Great Wave was assimilated
    Asian Pop Culture in the West Today: Consequences
    Week 12 Is Asia the Future?
    NOTE: These arrangements are subject to change without notice.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Weighting Learning Outcome
    Writing exercises Formative and Summative 45% 1-7
    Tutorial attendance and participation Formative and Summative 10% 1-7
    Major essay Formative and Summative 45% 1-7
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Students are expected to attend all tutorials and should provide appropriate documentation for any missed classes.
    Assessment Detail
    Tutorial attendance and participation: 10% weighting

    Writing exercises: 45% weighting
     
    Major Essay: essay on a chosen topic - 45% weighting
    Submission
    All assignments for this course must be submitted electronically via MyUni.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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