ANIML SC 3018RW - Pig Production - Science into Management III

Roseworthy Campus - Summer - 2017

Pork is the most consumed meat in the world and the second largest agricultural commodity. The management of modern pork production systems is based on detailed information on all aspects of the enterprise, including genetics and breeding, animal nutrition and growth performance, environmental and welfare requirements, health status, reproductive efficiency and product (meat) quality. This course will consider the advantages and disadvantages of various modern pork production systems (including welfare considerations, economic factors, the demand for product consistency, food safety issues, and other consumer expectations). The main factors that are required for the successful management of pigs are discussed, focusing on the management of suckling piglet, the weaner/grower pig and the breeding sow. This course is offered by the National Centre for Pork Industry Training and Education, based at Roseworthy Campus. It includes lectures; site visits to commercial operations, and other practical sessions. It is intended that students completing the course will understand both commercial pork production and the science that underlies it.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code ANIML SC 3018RW
    Course Pig Production - Science into Management III
    Coordinating Unit School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
    Term Summer
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s Roseworthy Campus
    Units 3
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Incompatible ANIML SC 3001RW
    Assumed Knowledge ANIML SC 2503RW
    Course Description Pork is the most consumed meat in the world and the second largest agricultural commodity. The management of modern pork production systems is based on detailed information on all aspects of the enterprise, including genetics and breeding, animal nutrition and growth performance, environmental and welfare requirements, health status, reproductive efficiency and product (meat) quality. This course will consider the advantages and disadvantages of various modern pork production systems (including welfare considerations, economic factors, the demand for product consistency, food safety issues, and other consumer expectations). The main factors that are required for the successful management of pigs are discussed, focusing on the management of suckling piglet, the weaner/grower pig and the breeding sow. This course is offered by the National Centre for Pork Industry Training and Education, based at Roseworthy Campus. It includes lectures; site visits to commercial operations, and other practical sessions. It is intended that students completing the course will understand both commercial pork production and the science that underlies it.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Will van Wettere

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 To understand the science underlying the genetics, reproduction, nutrition, environment & health of pigs
    2 To understand how these inputs can be manipulated to improve the efficiency of a pork production enterprise
    3 To understand how these inputs fit together into a complete enterprise that can be analysed
    4 To understand the impact of contemporary issues (e.g. animal welfare, antibiotic use & effluentpollution of the local environment) on the pork enterprise
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1, 4
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    3
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    3,4
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    3,4
  • Learning Resources
    Recommended Resources
    CDs required for the major assignment are available in the Roseworthy Library and have been installed on the Roseworthy Library computers.
    Online Learning
    MyUni: Teaching materials and course documentation will be posted on the MyUni website (http://myuni.adelaide.edu.au/).
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    Intensive 15 days course.

    Two weeks involve lectures, tutorials and field visit. The third week is used for students to complete their assignment which includes tutorial based availability of the course co-ordinator.
     
    Practical hands-on exercises and field trips support and reinforce lecture content; the piggery consultancy assignment allows problem-based integration and application of lecture and practical material.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    A student enrolled in this course will be expected to attend each scheduled day of activities (approx 8hrs per day) for the formal contact time required for the course (e.g., lectures and practicals). In addition, a student will have to undertake non-contact time (e.g., reading and revision) for the preparation of the assignment and revision for the exam.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Monday, January 13

    Pig Industry Overview

    Introduction to the piggery consultancy assignment
    Pig production facility visit - Roseworthy
    Tuesday, January 14

    Pig Reproduction

    Oestrus detection, mating & AI demonstration
    Wednesday, January 15

    Pig Reproduction (continued)
    Virtual piggery tour 1
    Piggery consultancy assignment tutorial
    Thursday, January 16 Pig Genetics
    Visit to SABOR AI station, Clare
    Friday, January 17 Pig Nutrition
    Visit to Laucke feedmill, Sheaoak Log
    Monday, January 20 Visit to a large commercial piggery
    Tuesday, January 21 Practical pig nutrition
    Piggery consultation assignment tutorial
    Wednesday, January 22 Pig Health
    Post mortem of pig
    Thursday, January 23 Pig buildings/environment/welfare
    Pig carcasses/meat
    Friday, January 24 Visit to Big River Pork abattoir
    Piggery consultancy assignment tutorial
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment task Type of assessment Percentage
    of total assessment for grading purposes

    Hurdle
    Yes
    or No or part of a combined hurdle
    Outcomes being assessed / achieved Approximate Timing of Assessment
    Theory Examination Summative 50% No 1-4 Three weeks after course
    has been completed
    Piggery Consultancy Assignment Summative 50% No 1-3 Week 3
    Assessment Detail

    Dates for the submission of the assignment and the theory exam are negotiated with students at the beginning of the course.

    Theory Examination – 3 hours

    Piggery Consultancy Assignment – guidelines will be provided at the beginning of the course.

    Replacement/Additional Assessment Exams
    Academic grounds: offered to students who achieve a final course mark between 45-49%. Note that Replacement/Additional Exams on academic grounds will be held within the University’s official Replacement/Additional Assessment Exam period (i.e. July for semester 1 courses and December for semester 2 courses).

    Medical and/or compassionate grounds: may also be granted to provide an opportunity for students whose academic performance was impaired by circumstances beyond their control in the primary examinations (i.e. medical and/or compassionate grounds). More details on Replacement/Additional Exams can be found at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/student/exams/supps.html.

    Submission
    Penalty Clauses (eg. Late assignments)

    Reports which are late, without medical or compassionate grounds, will NOT be marked and a score of 0 will be entered on the mark sheet. Extensions of deadlines may be allowed for reasonable causes. Such situations would include compassionate and medical grounds of the severity that would justify the awarding of a supplementary examination. Evidence for the grounds must be provided when an extension is requested. Extensions of deadlines should be negotiated with the course coordinator before the assignment is due. Extensions will not be provided on the grounds of poor prioritising of time. The assessment extension application form can be obtained from: http://www.sciences.adelaide.edu.au/current/

    Hand-in/Pick-up Location and Recording Procedures

    Assignments can be submitted either as hard copies or electronically via email to the course co-ordinator. All hard copies of reports must be handed into the course collection box at the Reception Desk in the Williams Building, Roseworthy Campus, on or before the due time and date. Late reprts (without an approved application for extension attached) will not be picked up and will not be marked. All reports should have a signed cover sheet (available on MyUni and at the Reception Desk) attached to your report.

    Provision of Feedback to Students

    Marked reports will be returned as soon as possible after the due date. Feedback on assignments will be via annotations on reports. Should students wish to have verbal feedback on assignments an
    appointment should be made with the course coordinator. Any assessment items not collected by the end of the examination period for Semester 1 will be destroyed.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.