COMMGMT 7006 - People and Organisations (M)

North Terrace Campus - Trimester 2 - 2016

This course explores behaviour in the workplace from an individual, group and organisational perspective. It seeks to develop an understanding of how individual attributes such as attitudes, personality, values and motivation, impact on employee performance. It also considers the role of groups and teams in supporting organisational outcomes, strategies for managing interpersonal and intergroup conflict, organisational communication and the importance of leadership in promoting positive employee behaviours. Topics examined from an organisational level perspective include culture, and stress management.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code COMMGMT 7006
    Course People and Organisations (M)
    Coordinating Unit Business School
    Term Trimester 2
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Course Description This course explores behaviour in the workplace from an individual, group and organisational perspective. It seeks to develop an understanding of how individual attributes such as attitudes, personality, values and motivation, impact on employee performance. It also considers the role of groups and teams in supporting organisational outcomes, strategies for managing interpersonal and intergroup conflict, organisational communication and the importance of leadership in promoting positive employee behaviours. Topics examined from an organisational level perspective include culture, and stress management.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Karen Grogan

    Dr. Karen Grogan lives in Adelaide and can be contacted at karen.grogan@adelaide.edu.au or 0418899109

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    This course (Class Number: 33223) is taught using a flipped classroom technique.

    In weeks 1-9 the course will be taught as a 3 hour interactive seminar i.e. every Tuesday 24/5/16 - 19/7/16.

    Location: Barr Smith South, 3022, Polygon Lecture Theatre.

    Time: 9am - 12pm.

    The course will then move to an online format for the weeks 10 -12 i.e. for the weeks beginning:
         
    Monday - 25/07/2016
       
    Monday - 01/08/2016
        
    Monday - 07/08/2016



  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    The course seeks to provide a learning environment in which students can:
    1. Develop a thorough knowledge and understanding of organisational behaviour;
    2. Research, analyse and evaluate information from a wide variety of sources;
    3. Analyse and apply theories, concepts and models in relation to organisational environments, cases and issues;
    4. Communicate findings in an appropriate and effective format;
    5. Engage in collegial online learning and constructively communicate in group discussions; and
    6. Develop lifelong tools for problem solving.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1-6
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1-6
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    1-6
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    1-6
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    1-6
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    1-6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Textbook:

    Wood, J., Zeffane, R., Fromholtz, M., Wiesner, R., Morrison, R., Factor, A., McKeown, T. (2015). Organisational Behaviour: Core Concepts and Applications, 4th Edition, Wiley ISBN-9780730314714.

    The text may be bought from the bookshop or online via the below link:

    Organisational Behaviour: Core Concepts and Applications, 4th Australasian Edition | Wiley Direct | Wiley Direct


    Recommended Resources
    WEEK 1: Tuesday 24/05/2016 (9am – 12pm)
    Introduction & Understanding Organisations and Organisational Behaviour

    Required Reading:

    1)    Text:
    Wood, J., Zeffane, R., Fromholtz, M., Wiesner, R., Morrison, R., Factor, A., McKeown, T. (2015). Organisational Behaviour: Core Concepts and Applications, 4th Edition, Wiley ISBN-9780730314714

    Chapter 1: What is organisational behaviour?

    WEEK 2: Tuesday 31/05/2016 (9am – 12pm)
    Individual Differences


    Required Reading:

    1)    Text:
    Wood, J., Zeffane, R., Fromholtz, M., Wiesner, R., Morrison, R., Factor, A., McKeown, T. (2015). Organisational Behaviour: Core Concepts and Applications, 4th Edition, Wiley ISBN-9780730314714

    Chapter 2: Individual attributes and their effects on job performance.

    Additional Reading:

    2)    Article:
    Johnstone M & Lee C (2009) Young Australian women's aspirations for work and family: individual and socio-cultural differences, Sex Roles, 61, 204-220 DOI 10 1007/s111 99- 009- 9622-8

    3)    Article:
    Waheeda S & Hadfitz M (2012) Individual differences as indicative of counterproductive work behaviour, Asian Social Science, 8 (13) 220-226

    4)    Article:
    Kuncel N, Ones D & Sackett P (2010) Individual differences as predictors of work, educational and broad life outcomes, Personality and Individual Differences, 49, 331-336


    WEEK 3: Tuesday 07/06/2016 (9am – 12pm)
    Motivation and Empowerment

    Required Reading:

    1)    Text:
    Wood, J., Zeffane, R., Fromholtz, M., Wiesner, R., Morrison, R., Factor, A., McKeown, T. (2015). Organisational Behaviour: Core Concepts and Applications, 4th Edition, Wiley ISBN-9780730314714

    Chapter 3: Motivation and empowerment

    Additional Reading:

    2)    Article:
    Billet S. & Choy S (2013) Learning through work: emerging perspectives and new challenges, Journal of Workplace Learning, 5 (4) 264-276

    3)    Article:
    Crick R, Haigney D, Huang S, Coburn T & Goldspink C (2012) Learning power in the workplace: the effective lifelong learning inventory and its reliability and validity and implications for learning and development, The International Journal of Human Resource Development, 24 (11) 2255-2272

    4)    Article:
    Longenecker C & Abernathy R (2013) The eight imperatives of adult learning, Human Resource Management International Digest, 21 (7) 30--334.

    5)    Article:
    Kultalahti S & Viitala R (2014) Sufficient challenges and the weekend ahead - generation Y describing motivation at work, Journal of Organisational Change Management, 27 (4) 569-582.

    6)    Article:
    Cattaneo L & Chapman A (2010) The process of empowerment, American Psychologist, 65 (7) 646-659.

    Part B: Essay Preparation & Discussion


    WEEK 4: Tuesday 14/06/2016 (9am – 12pm)
    Learning Reinforcement and Self-Management

    Required Reading:

    1)    Text:
    Wood, J., Zeffane, R., Fromholtz, M., Wiesner, R., Morrison, R., Factor, A., McKeown, T. (2015). Organisational Behaviour: Core Concepts and Applications, 4th Edition, Wiley ISBN-9780730314714

    Chapter 4: Learning, reinforcement and self-management

    Additional Reading:
    2)    Article:
    Mayfield M & Mayfield J (2011) Effective performance feedback for learning in organisations and organisation learning, Development and Learning in Organisations; An International Journal 6 (1) 15-18

    3)    Book Chapter:
    Latham G & Pinder C. (2005) Work motivation theory and research at the dawn of the twenty-first century, Annual Review of psychology 2005 56, 485-516


    WEEK 5: Tuesday 21/06/2016 (9am – 12pm)
    Job Design and Goal Setting

    Required Reading:
    1)    Text:
    Wood, J., Zeffane, R., Fromholtz, M., Wiesner, R., Morrison, R., Factor, A., McKeown, T. (2015). Organisational Behaviour: Core Concepts and Applications, 4th Edition, Wiley ISBN-9780730314714

    Chapter 5: Job design, goal setting and flexible work arrangements

    Additional Reading:

    2)    Article:
    Schmidtchen D (2013) Trust and confidence: The fertile soil of effective goal setting, Public Administration Review 73 (3), 464-465

    3)    Article:
    Hall D & Heras M (2010) Reintegrating job design and career theory: creating not just good jobs but smart jobs, Journal of Organizational Behavior, 31, 448-462

    4)    Article:
    Tulgan B (2014) The challenges of managing superstars, Employment Relations Today, DOI 10.1002/ert Wiley Periodicals Inc.

    5)    Article:
    Arnold D & Bongiovi J (2013) Precarious, informalizing, and flexible work: transforming concepts and understandings, American Behavioral Scientist, 57 (3) 289-308

    6)    Article:
    Ahmad S (2013) Paradigms of quality of work life, Journal of Human Values, 19 (1) 73-82


    WEEK 6: Tuesday 28/06/2016 (9am – 12pm)
    Groups and Group Dynamics

    Required Reading:

    1)    Text:
    Wood, J., Zeffane, R., Fromholtz, M., Wiesner, R., Morrison, R., Factor, A., McKeown, T. (2015). Organisational Behaviour: Core Concepts and Applications, 4th Edition, Wiley ISBN-9780730314714

    Chapter 6: Groups and group dynamics

    Additional Reading:

    2)    Article:
    Kraimer K, Takeuchi R & Freze M (2014) The global context and people at work: Special issue introduction, Personnel Psychology, 67, 5-21

    3)    Article:
    Stein M & Pinto J (2011) The dark side of groups: A “gang at work” in Enron, Group and Organization Management, 36 (6)
    692-721


    WEEK 7: Tuesday 05/07/2016 (9am – 12pm)
    Teamwork and Team Building


    Required Reading:

    1)    Text:
    Wood, J., Zeffane, R., Fromholtz, M., Wiesner, R., Morrison, R., Factor, A., McKeown, T. (2015). Organisational Behaviour: Core Concepts and Applications, 4th Edition, Wiley ISBN-9780730314714
    Chapter 7: Teamwork and Team Building

    Additional Reading:

    2)    Article:
    Gilley J, Morris M, Waite A, Coates T, & Veliquette A, (2010) Integrated theoretical model for building effective teams, Advances in Developing Human Resources, 12 (1) 7-28


    WEEK 8: Tuesday 12/07/2016 (9am – 12pm)
    Organisational Structure and Culture

    Required Reading:

    1)    Text:
    Wood, J., Zeffane, R., Fromholtz, M., Wiesner, R., Morrison, R., Factor, A., McKeown, T. (2015). Organisational Behaviour: Core Concepts and Applications, 4th Edition, Wiley ISBN-9780730314714

    Chapter 8: Organisational Structure and Design

    Chapter 9: Organisational Culture

    Additional Reading:

    2)    Book Chapter:
    Robbins T & Judge T (2008) Foundations of Organizational structure, in Essentials of Organizational Behaviour, 9th edition, 229-246, Prentice Hall New Jersey

    3)    Article:
    Flynn D (2015) Building a better model: A novel approach for mapping organisational and functional structure, Procedia Computer Science, 44, 194-203

    4)    Article:
    Mohelska H & Sokolova M (2014) Organisational culture and leadership- joint vessels? Procedia, Social and Behavioural Sciences, 171, 1011-1016

    5)    Article:
    Olson E (2007) Common belief, contested meanings: development and faith based organisational culture, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, 99 (4) 393-405

    WEEK 9: Tuesday 19/07/2016 (9am – 12pm)
    Power, Politics and Influence in Organisations


    Required Reading:

    1)    Text:
    Wood, J., Zeffane, R., Fromholtz, M., Wiesner, R., Morrison, R., Factor, A., McKeown, T. (2015). Organisational Behaviour: Core Concepts and Applications, 4th Edition, Wiley ISBN-9780730314714

    Chapter 10: Power, Politics and Influence in Organisations

    Additional Reading:

    2)    Article:
    Heimans J & Timms H (2014) Understanding “new power” Harvard Business Review December 2014, 48-56

    3)    Article:
    Kelly C (2015) Managing the relationship between knowledge and power in organisations, Aslib proceedings: New Information Perspectives, 59 (2) 125-138


    WEEK 10:
    Week beginning 25/07/2016 - ONLINE
    Leadership and Decision Making

    Required Reading:

    1)    Text:
    Wood, J., Zeffane, R., Fromholtz, M., Wiesner, R., Morrison, R., Factor, A., McKeown, T. (2015). Organisational Behaviour: Core Concepts and Applications, 4th Edition, Wiley ISBN-9780730314714

    Chapter 11: Leadership

    Chapter 12: Decision making

    Additional Reading:

    2)    Article:
    Karp T (2013) Studying subtle acts of leadership, Leadership 9 (1) 3-22

    3)    Article:
    Chambers L, Drysdale J & Hughes J (2010) The future of leadership: A practitioner view, European Management Journal, 28, 260-268

    4)    Article:
    Hess J & Bacigulapo A (2011) Enhancing decisions and decision making processes through the application of emotional intelligence skills, Management Decision, 49 (5) 710-721


    WEEK 11: Week beginning 01/08/2016 - ONLINE

    Part A: Communication, Conflict and Negotiation

    Required Reading:

    1)    Text:
    Wood, J., Zeffane, R., Fromholtz, M., Wiesner, R., Morrison, R., Factor, A., McKeown, T. (2015). Organisational Behaviour: Core Concepts and Applications, 4th Edition, Wiley ISBN-9780730314714

    Chapter 13: Communication, conflict and negotiation in organisations

    Additional Reading:

    2)     Article:
    Cacciattolo K (2015) Defining organisational communication, European Scientific Journal, 11 (20) 79-87
    3)     Article:
    Kelly D (2000) Using vision to improve organisational communication, Leadership and Organizational Development Journal, 21 (2) 92-101
    4)     Article:
    Cooper C & Scandura T (2015) Getting to “fair”: interactions as identity negotiation, Journal of Leadership and Organizational Studies, 22 (4) 48-432


    WEEK 12:
    Week beginning 08/08/2016 - ONLINE
    Organisational Change and Innovation


    Required Reading:

    1)    Text:
    Wood, J., Zeffane, R., Fromholtz, M., Wiesner, R., Morrison, R., Factor, A., McKeown, T. (2015). Organisational Behaviour: Core Concepts and Applications, 4th Edition, Wiley ISBN-9780730314714

    Chapter 14: Organisational change and innovation

    Additional Reading:

    2)    Article:
    McCarthy E (2013) The dynamics of culture, innovation and organisational change: a nano-psychology future perspective of the future of the psycho-social and cultural underpinnings of innovation and technology, AI and Soc, 28, 471-482, DOI 10.1007/s001.46-013-0512-9

    3)    Article:
    Damanpour F (2014) Footnotes to research on management innovation, Organization Studies, 35 (9) 1265-1285




    Online Learning


  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Weeks 1-9:

    The course will be taught as a 3 hour interactive seminar.


    Weeks 10-12:

    The course moves to an online format for the weeks beginning:

    Monday - 25/07/2016

    Monday - 01/08/2016

    Monday - 07/08/2016
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements

    Lecture / Interactive discussion: 3 hours per week (Weeks 1-9)

    Online activity / Discussion: 3 hours per week (Weeks 10 - 12)

    Reading and preparation: 2 hours per week (approximately)

    Learning Activities Summary
    Weeks 1-9:

    Lectures supported by problem-solving tutorials developing material covered in lectures plus online support.

    Students are expected to fully participate in small group discussion based on a series of pre-published questions.  Students  should come fully prepared having read (at a minimum) the required text but preferrably having engaged with the additional readings as well.  Notes as evidence of having prepared appropriately need to be brought to class.
     

    Weeks 10-12:

    Online lectures supported by problem-solving discussion boards developing material covered in lectures plus online support.

    Students are expected to fully participate in small online group discussion based on a series of pre-published questions.  Students  should enter into online discussion having fully prepared having read (at a minimum) the required text but preferrably having engaged with the additional readings as well.  All posts providing an answer to pre-posted questions should be referenced as evidence of having prepared appropriately.

    As a minimum contribution you are expected to raise at least one new idea/opinion/point in relation to the weekly question/s and respond to at least one comment by a fellow group member.  Answers to questions are expected to be substantive and scholarly of approximately 100-150 words.



    Small Group Discovery Experience
    The Small Group Discovery Experience in this course is based on small group discussion.  Weekly Discussion questions are provided below:

    Discussion:


    Week 1:

    1)    Selection of working groups.

    2)    Discussion Topic:

    Management today bears little resemblance to typical managerial behaviours a century ago or even fifty years ago.

    What have been the main contributors to these changes and how have they influenced the development of modern management?

    In your view what has been gained and what has been lost and how have you reached these judgments?


    Week 2:

    1)    Discussion Topic:

    Workforce diversity and differences in individual capacity, engagement, personality, appearance, gender, interests, values, etc. impact on the ways individuals behave, are evaluated, and how they assess the role of work in their lives. Yet nonetheless individuals within organisational departments need to work together to achieve departmental goals so there is a limit to the level of individual discrepancy should it potentially interfere with working together harmoniously.

    How do manager's need to behave to ensure they make the most of individual differences yet at the same time minimise some of the disadvantages?

    Explain with reference to both literature and your own workplace experiences.


    Week 3:

    1)    Discussion Topic:

    A number of theoretical frameworks have been developed over the last fifty years to explain motivation at work and improve individual performances through utilising motivational techniques to stimulate individual effort and achievement.

    Think of two workplaces from either your own experience or from write-ups in media outlets which have reputations for being good places to work.

    What type of incentives do they offer to their staff and why are they effective?

    Explain with reference to both literature and your own experiences?


    Week 4:

    1)    Discussion Topic:

    Recent years have seen a huge expansion in knowledge work i.e. work that requires a level of learned skill and knowledge of how to achieve the best outcome.

    To what extent do you believe organisations should provide forms of employee training?

    Should training just address work performance skills or should it also include soft skills in human behaviour interaction?

    Explain your reasoning and refer to relevant literature.


    Week 5:

    1)    Discussion Topic:

    What are some of the benefits and drawbacks associated with work flexibility for both the organisation and for the job holder?

    Is there any ideal percentage of staff who need to be in place all the time and if so what determines this ratio?

    Do you think flexibility will increase in future years? Why or why not?


    Week 6:

    1)    Discussion Topic:

    Your textbook outlines an excellent summary of the advantages and disadvantages of group interaction.

    Consider ways in which a manager might act to improve the advantages and minimize the disadvantages.

    What can group members do to make a group work more effectively together?


    Week 7:

    1)    Discussion Topic:

    Individuals differ on many variables ranging from competencies, personality, disability, values, appearance, age, religion, to name just a few.  From your reading consider how different aspects of other individual’s behaviour might impact on how you might judge their performance in the workplace, and in turn how these judgments might influence how you would treat them if you were to be their colleague or their manager.

    How might an organisation act to gain the maximum benefit from the diversity of its workforce whilst at the same time taking into account those circumstances where all staff should be treated identically rather than individually?

    What options are open to you when you feel you being treated differently than other staff or alternatively when you notice another person being treated more or less favourably than yourself?

    What outcomes would you be seeking in such situations, how therefore might you respond and why do you believe your response would be the best choice in the circumstances?


    Week 8:

    1)    Discussion Topic:

    Sometimes structures within organisations make it difficult for many staff to gain information directly from others with whom there are few formal communication channels.

    Explore the different ways informal channels operate in your organisation that aim to counteract and compensate for these dilemmas.

    How well do these succeed and why or why not?


    Week 9:

    1)    Discussion Topic:

    This chapter in your textbook contains a brief case study of the boy's club that operated in the Victorian Police Force, in Australia.
     
    What is your view of the impact of such practices on contemporary Australian organisations?


    Week 10:

    1)    Discussion Topic:

    Our view of how "good" leadership is exercised has changed significantly in recent times.

    Look at the list of the 20 characteristics of a strong leader in your textbook. Can you put them into priority order as applied to yourself?

    Explain how you reached your judgments.


    Week 11:

    1)    Discussion Topic:

    Explain how social media has changed the operations of your organisation in the last two years.

    What new changes are being planned?

    Do you believe such practices are efficient and effective?

    Why or why not?


    Week 12:

    1)    Discussion Topic:

    Most organisations seek to discover a balance between current and future revenue sources.

    Explain how your organisation seeks to foster the development of new ideas, evaluate their potential, and proceed with their implementation.
     
    What are some of the forces that support innovation in some circumstances and might mitigate against it in others?

    How are these dilemmas resolved?






  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    There are three main assessment tasks:

    1)    Submission of one essay – end of Week 4 (11:55 pm, 19/6/16).  (25%)

    2)    Submission of two case studies – end of Week 8 (11:55 pm, 17/7/16) and Week 12 (11:55 pm, 14/8/16).   (2 x 25%)

    3)    Preparation for and contribution to the answering, discussion and debate in relation to set weekly discussions topics.  (25%)

    Assessment
    #
    Details Due Date Mark Allocation Learning Outcome
    Assessed
    1 Essay Week 4
    (19/6/16)
    25% 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.
    2 Case Study 1 Week 8
    (17/7/16)
    25% 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.
    3 Case Study 2 Week 12 (14/8/16) 25% 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.
    4 Preparation & contribution to the answering,
    discussion and debate in relation to set weekly discussions topics
    Weeks
    1 - 12
    25% 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.


    Assessment Detail
    1)    Essay – Due at the end of Week 4 (11:55 pm, 19/6/16).  (25%)

    Overview

    Respond to the following prompt in a thoughtful and well written essay that is 2,000 to 3,000 words. Remember toread extensively to support your judgments and to reference all material sourced in your bibliography. The aim is to tackle this assignment as an exercise in applying what you read, in conjunction with your further reflection concerning real life experiences in the workplace.
     
    Assessment Task

    Individuals differ on many variables ranging from competencies, personality, disability, values, appearance, age, religion, to name just a few. From your reading consider how different aspects of other individual’s behaviour might impact on how you might judge their performance in the workplace, and in turn how these judgments might influence how you would treat them if you were to be their colleague or their manager.

    How might an organisation act to gain the maximum benefit from the diversity of its workforce whilst at the same time taking into account those circumstances where all staff should be treated identically rather than individually?

    What options are open to you when you feel you are being treated differently than other staff or alternatively when you notice another person being treated more or less favourably than yourself?

    What outcomes would you be seeking in such situations, how therefore might you respond and why do you believe your response would be the best choice in the circumstances?

    Refer to your literature in answering these questions.


    2a)    Case Study 1 – Due at the end of Week 8 (11:55 pm, 17/7/16).  (25%)

    Overview

    A copy of the Case Study, Cult Girl, is available on My Uni. Your task is to read and analyse the document from the perspective of organisational culture, group dynamics, teamwork and job design.

    Assessment Task

    In this case study you are required to consider the following questions in 1,500 words:       

    *  Considering the public debate, how should Brien Sorensen react?

    *  Was he right to think of provocation as a part of his company’s culture?

    *  Should he work to change the Cult mentality towards a culture that took better care of the girls, who felt wrong about what they did at work?  

    *  Was it his responsibility to nourish and maintain a sustainable gender image for his employees?

     

    2a)    Case Study 2 – Due at the end of Week 12 (11:55 pm, 14/8/16).  (25%)

    Overview

    A copy of the Case Study, Sustainability in the Auto Industry, is available on My Uni.  Your task is to read and undertake an analysis of the information the document provides .
     
    Assessment Task

    In this case study you are required to consider, in 1,500 words, the following:
         
    *  What critical factors led to the automotive industry becoming unstable?
         
    *  What role did power, politics and influence have to play in the scenario?
          
    *  What leadership related issues contributed to the instability and what measures were employed to address the problems?
          
    *  What measures are necessary for future sustainability of the industry?


     

    3)    Contributing to weekly discussions of topics by answering set questions.  (25%)

    Assessment Task

    Contributing to weekly topics by answering set questions is an important part of the learning process.  Discussions will occur in class time and a set of questions for each week is provided at the end of this outline.  Students are expected to have undertaken sufficient reading to fully participate in discussion and to contribute to the learning experience.  Marks are allocated for participation and preparation.  Marks are based on quantitative and qualitative markers and evidence of preparation.  Several times throughout the duration of the course the Lecturer will gather preparation notes and provide feedback (respond to online discussion).  Students who attend less than 5 sessions will receive 0 marks and those that attend greater than 10 sessions with preparation materials will achieve full marks.

    Please note: Discussion in week 10, 11 and 12 will occur online.


    Submission
    All assessment submissions are to be made through TURNITIN.

    Late assignments will be penalised in line with University policy.

    Resubmission is not available.

    Replacement/Additional Assessment may be granted in certain circumstances (e.g. medical, compassionate etc.).

    Any requests for extensions must be made in writing, to the lecturer stating reasons, before the due date.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.