MARKETNG 7030 - Marketing Ethics (M)

North Terrace Campus - Trimester 3 - 2015

The course will assess marketing ethical decision-making processes, issues and organisational control mechanisms. Topics: Defining Marketing ethics, relevant theories to examine ethical questions, code of conducts and ethical guidelines, a stepwise ethical marketing decision process, ethics in relation to marketing decisions: market research, segmentation, product, price, distribution, advertising and marketing communications and international marketing.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code MARKETNG 7030
    Course Marketing Ethics (M)
    Coordinating Unit Business School
    Term Trimester 3
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Assumed Knowledge At least 2 Marketing specialisation courses
    Course Description The course will assess marketing ethical decision-making processes, issues and organisational control mechanisms. Topics: Defining Marketing ethics, relevant theories to examine ethical questions, code of conducts and ethical guidelines, a stepwise ethical marketing decision process, ethics in relation to marketing decisions: market research, segmentation, product, price, distribution, advertising and marketing communications and international marketing.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Mr Nigel Barker

    Name: Claire Richardson
    Location: Room 13.05 
    Email: Claire.Richardson@adelaide.edu.au
    Course Website: www.myuni.adelaide.edu.au

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the issues involved in ensuring ethical marketing decision-making. There will be a focus on how to identify the ethical dimensions of any given marketing related decision, and on how to devise an ethical framework to determine the best outcome. Additionally, the course will aim to provide some opportunities for the practical implementation of the main concepts covered, by allowing students to apply their ethical decision making skills to real life cases and to explore a self-selected ethical marketing issue in detail.

    By the end of this course students should be able to:
    • Understand the role and importance of ethical decision making in the marketing environment
    • Identify professional ethics
    • Able to apply a range of theories to analyse opportunities in more complex marketing concepts
    • Utilise frameworks for ethical decision making, such as the 10-step model
    • Identify and evaluate the various stakeholders related to the ethical dilemma
    • Make ethical decisions regarding marketing objectives that encompass the stakeholders and take various theoretical stances of ethical and values.
    • Able to present engaging/persuasive arguments and debates
    • Able to communicate effectively in writing

    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1.1 An understanding of the underlying theories and concepts that inform alternative perspectives adopted in approaching ethical issues and problems in marketing 1.2 An understanding of the features of professional and regulatory frameworks and institutions relevant to marketing. 1.3 An understanding of diverse categories of ethical norms and standards in national and international marketing systems and their means of implementation.
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 1.1 High level critical thinking and problem solving skills 1.2 Capacity to engage with current ethical issues of significance in marketing and government 1.3 Ability to integrate marketing skills so as to find progressive solutions for challenges of today’s businesses and societies. 1.4 Capacity to apply marketing theory to respond to demands of the respective practice. 1.5 Ability to recognize the limits of the professional discipline and a capacity to identify, develop and apply alternative methods to coincide diverging interests. 1.6 Capacity to design and construct a logically compelling report
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 1.1 Capacity to participate in teamwork and deliver individual assessments 1.2 High level oral communication skills 1.3 High level written communication skills0
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 1.1 The capacity to engage in life-long learning 1.2 A commitment to high levels of academic scholarship
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 1.1 A commitment to marketing ethics and an appreciation of social justice through organisations that pursue good governance and conform to legal and professional standards and societies norms. 1.2 An appreciation of cultural diversity and sensitivity to the operation of commerce in this context.
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    3.1   Required Resources
    Text Books

    Business Ethics: A Managerial Approach
    Wicks, A.C. Freeman, R.E. Werhane, P.H. Martin, K.E.. Pearson Prentice Hall, 2010
    ISBN 0-13-142792-X

    In addition, there is a reader that students will need to collect from the ICC.


    Readings
    To keep abreast of current ethical topics and issues – this course is taught with supplementary case videos. These are highly informative, educational and for the most part, produced by the Australian government and/or their related media outlets such as the ABC or SBS. At times these videos can be challenging and confronting in terms of their content – but as is the tenor of this course – students are required to considered the issues from an ethical framework and not necessarily asked to ‘take sides’ or identify their personal position on matters. Rather – consider the issue through a structured 10 step model.

    These cases will form a major part of class room debates and that some of the written cases available in the reader will be discussed in tandem with the video cases – so students should come prepared having read the cases as well reviewed and prepared the questions associated to the videos. As there is a quite a lot of material to cover in each session, the videos will be uploaded onto MyUni for the students to watch in advance.

    Topic Session  Topics and Readings Video Case
    1 Mon 28 Jul Theoretical foundations of Ethics:
    Text Chap 1 & 2
    2 Mon 4 Aug Ethics and the art of persuasion:
    Text Chap 3
    Session 2 readings
    Nestle Baby Milk
    (Watch on MyUni)
    3 Mon 11 Aug Market Research and Ethics:
    Text Chap 10
    Session 3 readings
    Strictly Confidential*
    (Watch on MyUni)
    4 Mon 18 Aug Segmentation and Ethics:
    Text Chap 6
    Session 4 readings
    Bras, Bratz and Tweens*
    (Watch on MyUni)
    Mon 25 Aug No Class ! Individual Assignments due
    6 Mon 1 Sept Ethics and products:
    Session 6 readings
    Animal Pharm*
    (Watch on MyUni)
    7 Mon 8 Sept Ethics and products:
    Session 7 Readings
    Fat’s New Frontier*
    (Watch on MyUni)
    8 Mon 15 Sept Ethics and Pricing:
    Session 8 readings
    Dying for Drugs* (Watch on MyUni)
    B R E A K
    9 Mon 6 Oct Public Holiday (no class)
    10 Mon 13 Oct Ethics and Distribution: 
    Session 10 readings
    China Blue* (Watch on MyUni)

    11 Mon 20 Oct Ethics and Marketing Communications:
    Session 11 readings
    Difference of Opinion: Sex Sells*
    (Watch on MyUni)
    12 Mon 27 Oct Revision & Exam Preparation
    Read and prepare 10 step model
    for  “The great non debate over
    International sweatshops”

    End Feb (TBC) Final Exam


     

    Recommended Resources
    Students will be expected to make use of a range of reading material in the course. Some articles will be provided as a starting point but referencing from library resources and a variety of academic journals will be expected. Both case studies and weekly readings are provided with this outline.
    Online Learning
    Students can access lecture materials and additional notes, handouts and readings on MyUni. Students are expected to attend lectures with lectures printed out.

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    No information currently available.

    Workload

    No information currently available.

    Learning Activities Summary

    No information currently available.

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary

    No information currently available.

    Assessment Detail

    No information currently available.

    Submission

    No information currently available.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as CEQ surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes.  Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/ ), course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at least once every 2 years. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni).  In addition aggregated course SELT data can be found at: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/clpd/selt/aggregates
  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.