GEOLOGY 3016 - Igneous and Metamorphic Geology III

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2020

This course examines the origin and evolution of igneous and metamorphic rocks. It focuses on both descriptive work and theoretical background related to rock formation and development. Igneous Geology: This section examines the controls on the generation and differentiation of silicate melts within the earth and the contribution these processes have made to the composition of the crust and mantle through time. It also uses the basis of elemental and isotope geochemistry to understand these processes. We examine case studies of magma generation in key tectonic settings on the earth through time. Metamorphic Geology: This examines the nature and change of sub-solidus mineral assemblages and textures in rocks. This information provides a sound basis with which to examine orogenic processes.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code GEOLOGY 3016
    Course Igneous and Metamorphic Geology III
    Coordinating Unit School of Physical Sciences
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 7 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites GEOLOGY 2502
    Course Description This course examines the origin and evolution of igneous and metamorphic rocks. It focuses on both descriptive work and theoretical background related to rock formation and development.

    Igneous Geology: This section examines the controls on the generation and differentiation of silicate melts within the earth and the contribution these processes have made to the composition of the crust and mantle through time. It also uses the basis of elemental and isotope geochemistry to understand these processes. We examine case studies of magma generation in key tectonic settings on the earth through time.

    Metamorphic Geology: This examines the nature and change of sub-solidus mineral assemblages and textures in rocks. This information provides a sound basis with which to examine orogenic processes.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Professor Martin Hand

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    A successful student in this course should be able to:
    1 Demonstrate proficiency in common practical skills in igneous and metamorphic geology;
    2 Understand how the occurrence and character of different igneous and metamorphic rock suites is governed by and reflects the Earth's tectonic processes;
    3 Explain how magma is generated in the Earth's mantle and how magma typically evolves;
    4 Be able to organise, plot and evaluate the petrogenesis of igneous rock suites using elemental data;
    5 Understand different geochronological and isotope geochemical techniques and their applications to igneous and
    metamorphic processes;
    6 Explain how absolute pressure-temperature information is extracted from rock using thermodynamic expressions.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1-6
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1-6
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    1, 5
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    1, 4
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • Able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    not addressed
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    1, 4, 5
  • Learning Resources
    Recommended Resources
    WINTER, J.D. (2008) Principles of Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (2nd edition). Prentice Hall, pp. 766. ISBN 0-321-59257-3.
    SPEAR, F.S. (1993) Metamorphic phase equilibria and pressure-temperature-time paths. MONOGRAPH. Mineralogical Society of America, Washington, D.C., pp. 799. ISBN 0-939950-34-0.
    BARKER, A. J. (1998) Introduction to metamorphic textures and microstructures (Second Edition). Stanley Thornes (Publishers) Ltd., pp. 264. ISBN 0-7487-3985-8.
    YARDLEY, B.W.D., MACKENZIE, W.S. & GUILFORD, C. (1990) Atlas of metamorphic rocks and their textures. Longman Scientific and Technical, Harlow, Essex, pp. 120. ISBN 0-582-30166-1
    YARDLEY, B.W.D. (1989) An Introduction to Metamorphic Petrology. Addison Wesley Longman, Edinburgh Gate, Harlow, Essex, pp. 248. ISBN 0-582-30096-7.
    VERNON, R. H., CLARKE, G.L. (2008) Principles of metamorphic petrology. Cambridge University Press, pp. 446. ISBN 978-0-521-87178-5.
    MCBIRNEY, A., 1993: Igneous petrology 2nd Edition. Jones & Bartlett Publishers.
    FAURE, G., 1986. Principles of isotope geology, 2nd edition, Wiley and Sons.
    ROLLINSON., H. 1993. Using geochemical data: evaluation, presentation, interpretation. Longman.
    Online Learning
    Additional course-related material is available through the online course webpage, MyUni(Canvas).  MyUni(Canvas) is the primary form of communication with students in the course and hence students should regularly check the  website for important course-related
    announcements.  Teaching materials, reminders and course documentation  will also be posted on this site.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    The course consists of:
    • 2 or 3 hours of lectures/week
    • 1 x 4-hour practical class per week
    Due to high enrolment numbers there are repeat practical classes per week
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    A student enrolled in a 3 unit course, such as this, should expect to spend, on average 12 hours per week on the studies required. This includes both the formal contact time required to the course (e.g., lectures and practicals), as well as non-contact time (e.g., reading and revision)
    Learning Activities Summary
    Schedule
    Week Lecture Practical
    1 Review of minerals and metamorphic rocks and processes from Igneous & Metamorphic Geology 2 Revise minerals and rocks in hand specimen and thin section
    2 Petrography/intro to thermobarometry Metamorphic petrography
    3 Thermobarometry.
    Mineral zoning, diffusion and geo-speedometry
    Metamorphic petrography
    4 Heat flow, heat sources in the continental crust and subduction metamorphism Metamorphic petrography
    5 P-T-t paths, role of fluids in metamorphism Metamorphic petrography
    6 Mineralisation and metamorphism – the sulfur connection
    Constraining absolute rates in metamorphic systems (geochronology)
    no practicals (Good Friday holiday)
    7 Metamorphic geology short exam (in the two hour lecture slot) Refresher + review of igneous rocks and processes
    8

    Composition of the earth/major elements

    Variation diagrams and excel manipulation project
    9
    Trace elements/multi-element diagrams Mafic rocks practical
    10

    Isotopes and their use in petrology
    Volcanic arc rocks practical
    11
    Mantle sources/the mantle array/subduction 1 Granites practical
    12

    Subduction 2/crustal melting/granites
    Work on petrography reports/prac assignments
    13
    Igneous geology revision session
    Petrography reports/prac assignments due by end of session
    Specific Course Requirements
    Attendance is compulsory at all scheduled Igneous and Metamorphic Geology III practical sessions.  The learning outcomes for this course are substantially dependent on petrographic practice.  Therefore, missing any  practical class in a semester will result in a grade of FAIL being recorded for the course. Students are able to apply for an allowed absence from a practical session for
    medical or compassionate reasons by submitting an absence form with appropriate supporting documentation to the course coordinator. Application forms can be downloaded from the MyUni course website.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Percentage of total assessment
    Hurdle
    Yes/No
    Learning Outcome Due Date
    Metamorphic practical assignments  Summative 20% No 1-6 various
    Igneous processes practical work Summative

    20%

    No 1-6 various
    Mid-semester metamorphic geology exam Summative

    30% No 1-6 Mid-semester
    Mid-year Igneous geology exam Summative 30% No 1-6 Mid year exam period
    Assessment Related Requirements
    The following course rules apply to Practical Class attendance and its associated assessment:

    1. All Practicals will be marked, and are required to be completed and handed in within the Practical Session.

    2. You are allowed to miss one Practical Class during the course without explanation.  However, you are still required to complete that Practical in your own time, and it must be handed in by email to the course lecturer by 5pm Thursday of the week following the missed Practical.  Failure to hand the Practical in by that dead line will result in a score of zero for that Practical.

    3. If you miss a second (or more) Practical, you will be required to complete a reason of absence form coupled with the associated evidence of the reason (e.g. medical certificate).  That information must be sent to the Lecturer/Course Coordinator for approval.  If the reason is medical or compassionate, you will still be required to complete the Practical with a hand in date to be determined by the Lecturer/Course Coordinator.  If the reason is any other, you will be required to hand the Practical by email to the course lecturer by 5pm Thursday of the week following the missed Practical.  In each case, failure to hand in a revised deadline Practical will result in a score of zero for that Practical.

    4. If you are undertaking the course again after a previous attempt(s), you must not use previous practical sheets, answer keys or any  material from previous versions of the course in the execution of Practicals.  Use of such material will constitute plagiarism.

    5. If you miss more than one Practical without explanation, it will result in grade of FAIL being recorded for the course irrespective of your other marks in the course.

    Assessment Detail

    Metamorphic Practical work (20%)
    These assignments cover the content in the metamorphic practicals.

    Igneous geology  prac work (20%)
    thin section petrography and chemical project work.

    Mid-semester Metamorphic geology Exam  (30%)
    An exam during week 7 2-hour lecture slot.  Examines all metamorphic geology course content.

    Mid-year Igneous geology exam (30%)
    An exam during the midyear examination period. Examines all Igneous geology course content.

    Submission
    If an extension is not applied for, or not granted then a penalty for late submission will apply. A penalty of 10% of the value of the assignment for each calendar day that is late (i.e. weekends count as 2 days), up to a maximum of 50% of the available marks will be applied. This means that an assignment that is 5 days or more late without an approved extension can only receive a maximum of 50% of the mark
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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