GENETICS 3210 - Advanced Molecular Biology IIIB (Genetics)

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2014

This course combines lectures from GENETICS 3211 Gene Expression and Human & Development Genetics with practical exercises and/or laboratory placements in professional research laboratories. It includes a special set of tutorial/Problem Based Learning (PBL) exercises, not offered in any other course, which are designed to provide students with a perspective of how cutting edge molecular biology principles and techniques are applied to major research questions. The PBL segment of course will include aspects of biochemistry, genetics, microbiology/immunology and chemistry. This course will illustrate that cross-disciplinary approaches are essential in modern research.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code GENETICS 3210
    Course Advanced Molecular Biology IIIB (Genetics)
    Coordinating Unit School of Molecular and Biomedical Science
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 6
    Contact Up to 19 hours per fortnight
    Prerequisites BIOCHEM 2510 or BIOCHEM 2102 & BIOCHEM 2520 or BIOCHEM 2202 & GENETICS 2510 or GENETICS 2102 & GENETICS 2520 or GENETICS 2202
    Incompatible BIOCHEM 3225 & GENETICS 3006
    Assumed Knowledge GENETICS 3110
    Restrictions Available to BSc(MolBiol) students only
    Course Description This course combines lectures from GENETICS 3211 Gene Expression and Human & Development Genetics with practical exercises and/or laboratory placements in professional research laboratories. It includes a special set of tutorial/Problem Based Learning (PBL) exercises, not offered in any other course, which are designed to provide students with a perspective of how cutting edge molecular biology principles and techniques are applied to major research questions. The PBL segment of course will include aspects of biochemistry, genetics, microbiology/immunology and chemistry. This course will illustrate that cross-disciplinary approaches are essential in modern research.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Associate Professor Michael Lardelli

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes

    The course aims to give students a level of understanding of concepts and experimental techniques in the areas of gene regulation, developmental genetics and human genetics that would enable them to develop competencies expected of a university graduate in Genetics. The course cannot hope to cover comprehensively the very broad range of research questions in these areas but it will give students understanding of specific exemplary questions and provide them with knowledge of how they can extend their learning as required by future studies and employment. The practical aspect of the course aims to equip students with sufficient fundamental skills to apply them to a broad range of positions requiring these skills. The Problem Based Learning (PBL) exercises aim to give students a perspective of how cutting edge molecular biology principles and techniques are applied to major research questions.

    The anticipated knowledge, skills and/or attitude to be developed by the student are:

    1 Understanding of the underlying conceptual framework regarding the regulation of genes and how research expands our knowledge in this area
    2 Understanding of the underlying conceptual framework regarding how genes control embryo development and how research expands our knowledge in this area
    3 Understanding of the underlying conceptual framework regarding human genetics and how research expands our knowledge in this area
    4 Comprehension of scientific research data described in peer-reviewed journals
    5 Recording of laboratory research notes and analysis and reporting of experimental data
    6 The ability to extract relevant information from literature databases and to present it in written form
    7 To provide students with the opportunity to derive and interpret novel experimental outcomes in a supportive environment commensurate with their capabilities as a final year candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (Molecular Biology).




    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1,2,3,4,5,6,7
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 4,5,6
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 5,6,7
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 5
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 4,6,7
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 4,6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources

     This course will require the following texts and other resources:

    · Text for Human Genetics lectures: 'Human Molecular Genetics - 4th Edition' by Strachan and Read.
    · Copies of scientific papers for Gene Regulation and Developmental Genetics aspects of the course (supplied by the lecturers)
    · Collaborating research laboratories
    · Scientific equipment
    · Lecture theatres and tutorial rooms
    · Access to University Library
    · Access to computers and internet
    · Students must supply laboratory coat and safety glasses for their own use

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    This course will be delivered by the following means:

    3 lectures of 1 hour each per week

    1 tutorial of 1 hour per fortnight

    12 hours of practical laboratory/placement per fortnight (weeks 1-6)
    (Note: Students who do not obtain a laboratory placement will perform the normal Practical course of Genetics 3211 in weeks 1-6)

    6 PBL sessions of up to 5 hours per week in weeks 7-12.

    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    A student enrolled in a 6 unit course, such as this, should expect to spend, on average 24 hours per week on the studies required. This includes both the formal contact time required to the course (e.g., lectures and practicals), as well as non-contact time (e.g., reading and revision).
    Learning Activities Summary
    Week 1 Type of learning activity Topic
    Lecture Developmental Neurogenetics
    Practical Laboratory Placement
    Tutorial or other activity None
    Week 2 Lecture Developmental Neurogenetics
    Practical Laboratory Placement
    Tutorial or other activity Developmental Neurogenetics
    Week 3 Lecture DeveDevelopmental Neurogenetics / Regulation of Gene Expression
    Practical Laboratory Placement
    Tutorial or other activity None
    Week 4 Lecture Regulation of Gene Expression
    Practical Laboratory Placement
    Tutorial or other activity Developmental Neurogenetics
    Week 5 Lecture Regulation of Gene Expression
    Practical Laboratory Placement
    Tutorial or other activity Regulation of Gene Expression
    Week 6 Lecture Regulation of Gene Expression
    Practical Laboratory Placement
    Tutorial or other activity None
    Week 7 Lecture Plant Developmental Genetics
    Practical Problem Based Learning Exercises
    Tutorial or other activity Regulation of Gene Expression
    Week 8 Lecture Epigenetics
    Practical Problem Based Learning Exercises
    Tutorial or other activity Plant Developmental Genetics
    Mid Semester Break
    Week 9 Lecture Epigenetics / Human Genetics
    Practical Problem Based Learning Exercises
    Tutorial or other activity Epigenetics
    Week 10 Lecture Human Genetics
    Practical Problem Based Learning Exercises
    Tutorial or other activity Human Genetics
    Week 11 Lecture Human Genetics
    Practical Problem Based Learning Exercises
    Tutorial or other activity None
    Week 12 Lecture Human Genetics
    Practical Problem Based Learning Exercises
    Tutorial or other activity Human Genetics
    Week 13* Lecture
    Practical
    Tutorial

    X
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment task Type of assessment Percentage of total assessment for grading purposes # Hurdle

    Yes or No #
    Outcomes being assessed / achieved
    Final Examination Summative 60% No 1, 2, 3, 4
    Laboratory Placement/Practical Formative/Summative 20% No 1,3,4,7
    PBL Summative 20% No 2, 4, 5
    Assessment Detail
     Laboratory Placement (20% of total course grade, learning objectives 1,3,4,7) - comprised of one 10-15 minute oral presentation (4%), laboratory performance (6%) and written practical report (10%) in weeks 1-6. Marked Practical Reports will be handed in at the end of week 6 and promptly assessed by mentors/demonstrators to provide feedback to students and a sense of progressive accomplishment in the course. Students who do not obtain a laboratory placement will perform the normal Practical course of Genetics 3211 for weeks 1-6 and will be assessed as for that course.

    PBL exercises, including assessment via 2 small group oral presentations, weeks 7-12: (20% of total course grade, learning objectives 2,4,5). Each individual in the PBL group marked separately.

    Final examination (60% of course grade, learning objectives 1,2,3,4). This will be a three hour examination assessing any/all theoretical aspects of the course. The examination includes compulsory areas but also a limited choice of questions within each compulsory area.
    Submission
    Details on submission are provided in the Course Handbook and/or Practical manuals etc.

    Late submission of assessments:

    If an extension is not applied for, or not granted then a penalty for late submission will apply. A penalty of 10% of the value of the assignment for each calendar day that is late (i.e. weekends count as 2 days), up to a maximum of 50% of the available marks will be applied. This means that an assignment that is 5 days or more late without an approved extension can only receive a maximum of 50% of the mark.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
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