PETROENG 2010 - Drilling Engineering

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2018

The aim of the course is to provide students with a fundamental understanding of petroleum well drilling procedures, its mechanics, and design methodology. The course gives an overview of drilling rig operations and related equipment; offshore drilling and advanced drilling tools; drill-string design; drill bit technology; drilling hydraulics; drilling mud design; pore pressure and fracture pressure calculations; basic casing design; basic well control; well planning.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code PETROENG 2010
    Course Drilling Engineering
    Coordinating Unit Australian School of Petroleum
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 5 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Assumed Knowledge Introduction to Petroleum Engineering, Higher Maths, Physics, Chemistry, Fundamental laws of statics and dynamics, stress analysis, fluid flow through pipes and annulus
    Course Description The aim of the course is to provide students with a fundamental understanding of petroleum well drilling procedures, its mechanics, and design methodology. The course gives an overview of drilling rig operations and related equipment; offshore drilling and advanced drilling tools; drill-string design; drill bit technology; drilling hydraulics; drilling mud design; pore pressure and fracture pressure calculations; basic casing design; basic well control; well planning.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Alireza Salmachi

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

    There will be three hours of lectures each week and two hours of practical or tutorial each week.  Each student will complete a total of four practicals, four tutorials and a group research project.  You are expected to attend all sessions.
  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course students will be able to:

     
    1 Understand key aspects of drilling operations, drill rig types and fundamental differences between onshore and offshore drilling.
    2 Explain the mechanics and design of drill bits, how different drill bits function and key issues associated with drill bit selection.
    3 Explain the process of mud preparation, circulation and cleaning, including understanding of mud types, mud chemistry and properties and the calculation of required pump rate and power.
    4 Describe the purpose of downhole equipment used in drilling, including calculation of hole, pipe and annulus volumes.
    5 Understand the concepts and equipment required in hoisting systems, including determination of loads and hoisting power.
    6 Analysis of critical safety parameters associated with drilling, such as safe drilling window, pore pressure, fracture pressure and collapse pressure.
    7 Describe the hydraulics of mud flow through the borehole including calculation and application of hydraulics through the string, across the drill bit and up the annulus.
    8 Explain the process and importance of casing design.
    9 Utilise knowledge of key safety features in well control procedures.
    10 Apply a critical-thinking and problem-solving approach towards the principles of drilling engineering.

     
    The above course learning outcomes are aligned with the Engineers Australia Stage 1 Competency Standard for the Professional Engineer.
    The course is designed to develop the following Elements of Competency: 1.1   1.2   1.3   1.4   1.5   1.6   2.1   2.2   2.3   2.4   

    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    10
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,10
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    1,2,3,4,5,9
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    There are no text books that are compulsory for this course.
    Recommended Resources
    · “Applied Drilling Engineering” by A.T. Bourgoyne, Jr., et al., SPE textbook series, Vol. 2 (1991) (this is the primary textbook for the course).

    I also recommend:
    · “Drilling Engineering”, by A. A. Azar and G. Robello Samuel, PennWell Publisher, 2007
    · “Volume II – Drilling Engineering”, by R. F. Mitchell, SPE Petroleum Engineering Handbook Series, 2006.
    · “Advanced Drilling and Well Engineering”, by B. S. Aadnoy, I. Cooper, S.Z. Miska, R. F. Mitchell and M. L. Payne, published by SPE, 2009
    · “Composition and Properties of Well Oil Drilling Fluids”, by G.R. Gray and H.C.H. Darley, Gulf Publishing Company
    · “Oil Well Drilling Engineering: principles and practice”, by H. Rabia, Graham and Trotman Publisher, UK, 1985
    · “Practical Well Planning and Drilling Manual”, By Steve Devereux, PennWell Publishing Limited, USA, 1998
    · “Modern Well Design”, by Brent S. Aadnoy, A.A.Balkema, Rotterdam, Brookfield, 1996 · “Baroid Mud Technology Handbook” 1965 .“Petroleum Engineering Handbook for the Practicing Engineer: Volume 2” by M.A.Mian, PennWell Publishing Company, 1992.
    Online Learning
    Most teaching materials will be provided through ‘MyUni’ and handouts during the lectures. Where possible, lectures will be recorded and made available on MyUni. A course discussion board will be available on MyUni. The discussion board is used to introduce practical and real problems occurring during drilling operation and students are asked to participate in an interactive discussion area to resolve drilling issues. The aim of the discussion board is to enhance students’ critical thinking and decision making abilities.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course provides students with a broad and focussed knowledge of drilling engineering. Weekly lectures are designed to give students a foundation for the broad range of drilling engineering topics, as well as to provide students with the detailed knowledge and skills needed in drilling engineering. The fundamental foundation material covered in the lectures is supported by hands-on learning in practicals and advanced problem-solving exercises in tutorials. Learning during lectures will be further supported by in class formative mini-quizzes and discussions. An interactive iBook has been developed specifically for this course to support and facilitate students learning experience.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    This course involves three sessions (50 minutes each) per week of lectures combined with a further 1 hour and 50 minute long practical/tutorial session.
    Learning Activities Summary
    Schedule
    Week 1 Course overview, Introduction to drilling engineering, rotary drilling (Drill rigs, Rig power system).
    Week 2 Drilling Mud
    Week 3 Circulation system
    Week 4 Hoisting system and Rotary system
    Week 5 Drilling Hydraulics
    Week 6 Drilling Hydraulics and hydraulics optimization
    Week 7 Drill bits
    Week 8 Project presentations
    Week 9 Project presentations
    Week 10 Well control
    Week 11 Well control
    Week 12 Revision of course materials/previous year final exam
    Specific Course Requirements
    Not applicable.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Weighting (%) Individual/ Group Formative/ Summative
    Due (week)*
    Hurdle criteria Learning outcomes
    Fortnightly tutorials 10 Individual Formative Weeks 2-12 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.
    Fortnightly practicals 10 Individual Formative Week 3-11 3. 7.
    Research project 30 Group Summative Week 9 & 10 10.
    Final exam 50 Min 45% 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.
    Total 100
    * The specific due date for each assessment task will be available on MyUni.
     
    This assessment breakdown is registered as an exemption to the University's Assessment for Coursework Programs Policy. The exemption is related to the Procedures clause(s):
     
    Assessment Related Requirements
    You will be advised of the exact due dates for the  tutorials and practicals in class. Tutorials and practicals will generally be due 1-2 weeks after the session. You will be advised about the exact date of mid term exam at the begining of the course.
    Assessment Detail
    The course is assessed with the following weightings: Written Examination (50%),  Tutorials (total of 10%), Practical reports (10%), Research project (30%).

    There is a hurdle for the Final exam in this course. You must achieve at least 45 out of 100 in the Final exam to pass the course.
    Submission
    Deadlines for submission will be given in class. Practical and tutorial assignments will be submitted online. The group exercise should be submitted as a written report online, plus the group will give a 15 minute oral summary, limited to one slide per group member.

    Extensions for Assessment Tasks
    Extensions of deadlines for assessment tasks may be allowed for reasonable causes. Such situations would include compassionate and medical grounds of the severity that would justify the awarding of a supplementary examination. Evidence for the grounds must be provided when an extension is requested. Students are required to apply for an extension to the Course Co-ordinator before the assessment task is due. Extensions will not be provided on the grounds of poor prioritising of time. 

    Penalty for Late Submission of Assessment Tasks
    Assessment tasks must be submitted by the stated deadlines. There will be a penalty for late submission of assessment tasks. The submitted work will be marked ‘without prejudice’ and 10% of the obtained mark will be deducted for each working day (or part of a day) that an assessment task is late, up to a maximum penalty of 50% of the mark attained. An examiner may elect not to accept any assessment task that a student wants to submit after that task has been marked and feedback provided to the rest of the class. Deadlines for submission will be given in class. Practical and tutorial assignments will be submitted as paper hardcopies. The group exercise will be provided as an on-line wiki, plus the group will give a 15 minute oral summary, limited to one slide per group member.

    Extensions for Assessment Tasks
    Extensions of deadlines for assessment tasks may be allowed for reasonable causes. Such situations would include compassionate and medical grounds of the severity that would justify the awarding of a supplementary examination. Evidence for the grounds must be provided when an extension is requested. Students are required to apply for an extension to the Course Co-ordinator before the assessment task is due. Extensions will not be provided on the grounds of poor prioritising of time. 

    Penalty for Late Submission of Assessment Tasks
    Assessment tasks must be submitted by the stated deadlines. There will be a penalty for late submission of assessment tasks. The submitted work will be marked ‘without prejudice’ and 10% of the obtained mark will be deducted for each working day (or part of a day) that an assessment task is late, up to a maximum penalty of 50% of the mark attained. An examiner may elect not to accept any assessment task that a student wants to submit after that task has been marked and feedback provided to the rest of the class.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    Communication
    It is important that all students maintain active communication channels throughout the year. The primary communication channels to students in this course are as follows.

    MyUni: Students should regularly check the MyUni website (http://myuni.adelaide.edu.au/). 

    Email: Each student should regularly check his or her University-provided email account (firstname.lastname@student.adelaide.edu.au) for information from members of the academic staff concerning course work matters and other announcements as they arise. Make sure you clean up your Inbox regularly as if it is full you will not receive our email! We will regard an email message being sent to your student email address or an announcement posted on the MyUni site as our having communicated with each member of the class. Not reading one’s University provided email or MyUni announcements will not be a valid excuse for missing important deadlines etc.
  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.