ARTH 5522 - Curatorial and Museum Studies A

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2014

This subject will focus on the role and function of museums, the nature and purpose of collections, the history and philosophy of museums and their collections, cultural issues of collecting, collection policies and conservation issues and practice. Students will examine these issues theoretically, and within the context of galleries and museums and apply them in a research project.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code ARTH 5522
    Course Curatorial and Museum Studies A
    Coordinating Unit History
    Term Semester 1
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 6
    Contact Up to 3 hours per week
    Restrictions Available to MA(Cur&MuseumSt) students only
    Course Description This subject will focus on the role and function of museums, the nature and purpose of collections, the history and philosophy of museums and their collections, cultural issues of collecting, collection policies and conservation issues and practice. Students will examine these issues theoretically, and within the context of galleries and museums and apply them in a research project.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Claire Roberts

    claire.m.roberts@adelaide.edu.au
    Napier 316
    Phone: 8313 3205
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    On successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate:
    1 A broad understanding of the history and philosophy of museums and collections within a global context
    2 An ability to identify, access and critically evaluate a wide variety of relevant primary, secondary, textual and visual materials using a range of technologies
    3 Specialised research skills focussing on analysis and synthesis of museological information using a wide range of methodologies and innovative approaches
    4 An ability to generate ideas and to construct evidence based arguments in a planned and timely manner
    5 An ability to work in the gallery/museum sector in a range of curatorial and collection management roles and communicate effectively in individual and team-based situations
    6 An awareness of the ethical issues in their professional and intellectual context including the gallery/museum sector within a global context
    7 An awareness of potential leadership roles in the community of scholars and in the wider gallery and museum community
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 2, 3
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 3, 4
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 5
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 2
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 1, 2, 3
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 7
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    · Course Handbook – distributed at the first tutorial.
    · Course Reader – distributed at the first tutorial.
    Recommended Resources

    Recommended list:

    Barker, D. (ed).Contemporary Cultures of Display, Yale University Press, New Haven, 1999.

    Carbonell, B. (ed). Museum Studies: An Anthology of Contexts, Blackwell, Morden, 2004

    Museum Methods, Museums Australia, 2002

    Preziozi, D. Grasping the World: The Idea of the Museum, Ashgate, 2004

    Schubert, K. The Curator’s Egg, Ridinghouse, London, 2009.

    Smith, Terry. Thinking Contemporary Curating, Independent Curators International, 2012.

    Vergo, P. (ed). The New Museology, London, Reaktion Books, 1989

    · Recommended list (available at the Art Gallery of South Australia bookshop or online booksellers)
    · Lecture and tutorial images (on PowerPoint)
    · Barr Smith Library Resource Guide:
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/library/guide/hum/history/art.html

    Online Learning
    MyUni: https://myuni.adelaide.edu.au/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp

    Readings and resources that supplement the course reader will be available on Myuni.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Lectures, workshops and seminars.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The course is composed of 3 hour long classes, to be held in the University, at the Art Gallery of South Australia and other museum and gallery spaces.

    Please note that 6-unit courses in HUMSS are designed on the assumption that all learning and assessment activities (including lectures, tutorials, preparatory work, research and writing of assignments etc.) will require approximately 312 hours.

    Learning Activities Summary
    The course consists of twelve weeks of classes, including university and gallery sessions.
    Specific Course Requirements
    A number of the "Gallery" sessions will be held at museums and galleries in Adelaide other than the Art Gallery of South Australia. It is the responsibility of students to arrange their own transport to those locations. Classes begin at the designated starting times set for the course at those venues.
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    The course is based on small group discovery experiences. Tutorials will involve group discussion of set texts and topical issues.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment for this course consists of two elements:

    Tutorial tasks and participation accounts for 10% of the course grade. (Learning objectives 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7).

    There is a major research project, worth 90% of the course grade. (Learning objectives 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7).

    Assessment Related Requirements
    The due dates for assessment are treated as examination dates. Requests for extension stating the reason for the extension must be sent to your tutor for approval in advance of the due date and supplemented by a hard-copy Extension Request form available on MyUni that must be signed off by both student and tutor.
    Assessment Detail
    Research Project (10,000 –12,000 words)

    Task description: please see list of research topics relevant to this course which will be published at the beginning of the course, or you may negotiate a topic. You will also have to write a 500-word abstract.

    Weighting: 90%

    Deadline: To be announced.

    Submission: Two soft bound hard copies to be sent out to examiners.

    Assignments are due at midday on the due date.

    Tutorial tasks

    Task description: Topics are listed under the weekly university tutorials in the Course Guide, which will be given to you at the start of the course.

    Weighting: 10%
    Submission
    In addition to submitting your thesis in hard copy, you must also submit it online via MyUni

    All assignments are to be submitted electronically via MyUni – this is a two-step process. The assignment needs to be electronically submitted for marking via the ‘Assignments’ link in the course menu. It then needs to be submitted separately to Turnitin, which is also done via the MyUni site. Marked assignments will be returned to the student in printed form.

    Assignments are due at midday on the due date.

    Extensions
    Students wishing to apply for an extension need to submit the relevant form available at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/student/exams/mod_arrange.html to the school office at least 5 days prior to the due date for the assignment.

    Exceptions to the Policy
    If one of the following criteria is met, an informal extension can be organised with the course coordinator or tutor:
    · small extension – 2 days or less;
    · assessment item is worth 20% or less;
    · student is registered with the Disability Office (need to attach a Disability Access Plan – DAP).

    The due dates for assessment are treated as examination dates. Requests for extension stating the reason for the extension must be sent to your tutor for approval in advance of the due date and supplemented by a hard-copy Extension Request form available on MyUni that must be signed off by both student and tutor. Extensions will be granted on the grounds of hardship or illness, but you must submit a request for an extension to your tutor in writing via email (with supporting medical or other evidence to be provided) before the due date.
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines

    This section contains links to relevant assessment-related policies and guidelines - all university policies.

    The School of History and Politics is committed to upholding the  University's Policy on Occupational Health & Safety (OH&S). All  staff and students have a legal responsibility to act in the interests  of themselves and others with respect to OH&S. For information on the School's contingency plan and emergency procedures, please see the OH&S section on the school website:

    http://www.hss.adelaide.edu.au/historypolitics/ohs
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