MICRO 2504 - Microbiology II (Biotechnology)

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2017

This course is an introduction to microbiology that provides a strong grounding in fundamental aspects of the basic biology of bacteria and bacterial viruses as well as aspects of molecular biology and genetics. Emphasis is placed on biotechnological applications of bacteria such as the cloning of bacterial genes, expression of recombinant proteins for therapeutic and industrial uses and development of biological control agents. Topics covered include: introduction to microorganisms and their environment, microbial structure and function; microbial molecular biology and genetics; bacterial viruses; new and emerging pathogens of humans and other animals; mechanisms by which micro-organisms cause disease in plants and animals; biotechnological applications of bacteria. Students enrolled in this course will attend one or more of Practicals A, B and C. Refer to Current Students Online Enrolment information at www.sciences.adelaide.edu.au for further information.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code MICRO 2504
    Course Microbiology II (Biotechnology)
    Coordinating Unit School of Biological Sciences
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 5 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange N
    Prerequisites BIOLOGY 1101/1101ND or BIOLOGY 1401, & BIOLOGY 1201 or BIOLOGY 1202
    Incompatible MICRO 2500, MICRO 2502, MICRO 2000, MICRO 2004 & MICRO 3003
    Assumed Knowledge CHEM 1100 or CHEM 1101 & CHEM 1200 or CHEM 1201
    Restrictions Available to B Sc (Biotechnology) students only
    Course Description This course is an introduction to microbiology that provides a strong grounding in fundamental aspects of the basic biology of bacteria and bacterial viruses as well as aspects of molecular biology and genetics. Emphasis is placed on biotechnological applications of bacteria such as the cloning of bacterial genes, expression of recombinant proteins for therapeutic and industrial uses and development of biological control agents. Topics covered include: introduction to microorganisms and their environment, microbial structure and function; microbial molecular biology and genetics; bacterial viruses; new and emerging pathogens of humans and other animals; mechanisms by which micro-organisms cause disease in plants and animals; biotechnological applications of bacteria. Students enrolled in this course will attend one or more of Practicals A, B and C. Refer to Current Students Online Enrolment information at www.sciences.adelaide.edu.au for further information.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Stephen Kidd

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes

    At the end of the course students should:

    1. Have an appreciation of the practice of microbiology.
    2. Be able to describe the structure of bacterial cells, the form, arrangement and replication of genetic material within a bacterial cell; the types of mutations that may occur in bacterial DNA, evolution of bacteria; the use of nucleic acid in the molecular taxonomy of bacterial species.
    3. Be familiar with the mechanisms by which bacteria can exchange fragments of DNA, the mechanisms by which self-transmissible DNA fragments maintain their presence in bacterial cells and how they may mediate their own transfer to other bacterial cells.
    4. Be able to describe the replication strategies used by bacterial viruses.
    5. Be able to describe the nutritional and physical requirements for bacterial growth and explain the dynamics of the growth of a bacterial population and how this growth can be measured.
    6. Be able to describe the principles involved in killing bacteria, and make recoomendations on use of physical and chemical methods used to control microbial growth, including how the effectiveness of heat treatments is measured.
    7. Have an understanding of how proteins are secreted and exported to different cellular compartments and appreciate the role of membrane and cell wall associated proteins in nutrient transport and microbial pathogenesis.
    8. Be familiar with the ways in which bacterial pathogens can be transmitted to humans, and the factors that influence transmission of pathogens and the occurrence of infectious diseases. This includes the concepts of virulence and virulence factors, opportunistic pathogens, and predisposing factors to disease.
    9. Appreciate the barriers that are used by the host to resist bacterial pathogens, the mechanisms whereby innate (natural) and adaptive (acquired) immunity provide protection against infectious agents, and the role of vaccines in protection of animal hosts from infection.
    10. Understand how the plant pathogen, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, can be used to construct transgenic plants.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1-10
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    J.M. Willey, L.M. Sherwood and C.J. Woolverton.  Prescott's Microbiology.  9th Edition.  McGraw Hill.
    Online Learning
    Teaching materials and course documentation will be posted on the MyUni website (http://myuni.adelaide.edu.au/).
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course will be delivered in the following means:
    • 24 x 1 hour lectures and 8 x 1 hour tutorials delivered over 12 weeks. 
    • Practical sessions as required.  Practical class contact of 4hr per week for up to five weeks during semester, as required according to the MBS Practical ABC system (see Course Planner for details, under SCIENCE 2100/2101/2102 as required).
    Student learning is further supported by provision of additional questions to help focus independent study during tutorial contact weeks, plus extra resources on MyUni for some topics. Student's revision of key concepts from pre-requisite courses is encouraged and facilitated by provision of material to guide and aid revision on MyUni, plus formative online revision quizzes.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    A student enrolled in a 3 unit course, such as this, should expect to spend, on average 12 hours per week on the studies required. This includes both the formal contact time required to the course (e.g., lectures and practicals), as well as non-contact time (e.g., reading and revision).

    Learning Activities Summary
    Practicals for this course are Pracs ABC which involves additional enrolment
    Schedule
    Week Type of learning activity Topic
    Week 1 Lecture Introduction to the Microbial World
    Morphology and Structure of Bacteria
    Diversity of Bacteria
    Practical
    Tutorial or other activity
    Week 2 Lecture Factors affecting Growth of Bacteria I
    Factors affecting Growth of Bacteria II
    Factors affecting Growth of Bacteria III
    Practical
    Tutorial or other activity Review of bacterial structure and function
    Week 3 Lecture Cultivation and Identification of Bacteria
    Cell Membranes and Membrane Associated Functions
    Cell Wall Synthesis and Assembly
    Practical
    Tutorial or other activity Growth of bacterial populations
    Week 4 Lecture Nutrient Uptake
    Protein Secretion in Gram positive and negative bacteria
    No scheduled lecture
    Practical
    Tutorial or other activity Inactivation of bacteria.
    Week 5 Lecture No scheduled lecture
    No scheduled lecture
    Microbiology Test 1 (Weeks 1 to 4)
    Practical
    Tutorial or other activity
    Week 6 Lecture Bacterial Genetics and Molecular Biology II
    Bacterial Genetics and Molecular Biology I
    Recombinant DNA Technology Fundamentals I
    Practical
    Tutorial or other activity Protein secretion in bacteria
    Week 7 Lecture Recombinant DNA Technology Fundamentals II
    Lateral Gene Transfer and Gene Knockouts
    Jumping Genes: IS elements, Transposons &
    Integrons
    Practical
    Tutorial or other activity
    Week 8 Lecture Bacteriophage Diversity & Interaction with Host Cells I
    Bacteriophage Diversity & Interaction with Host Cells II
    No scheduled lecture
    Practical
    Tutorial or other activity Fundamentals of bacterial recombinant DNA technology.
    Week 9 Lecture No scheduled lecture
    No scheduled lecture
    Microbiology Test 2 (Weeks 6 to 8)
    Practical
    Tutorial or other activity
    Week 10 Lecture Bacteria and Human Health
    Colonization to Disease
    Bacterial Survival in the Host
    Practical
    Tutorial or other activity Lateral gene transfer.
    Week 11 Lecture Virulence factors; Mechanisms for Disease
    No scheduled lecture
    Agrobacterium: An Extraordinary Plant Pathogen
    Practical
    Tutorial or other activity Microbial pathogenesis.  Pathology of Urinary tract infections caused by Escherichia coli.
    Week 12 Lecture Biotechnology of Transgenic Plants
    Water Treatment & Testing, Water-borne Pathogens
    Wastewater Treatment
    Practical
    Tutorial or other activity Bioloogy and molecular biology of plant infections by Agrobacterium tumefaciens.
    Week 13* Lecture Optional Theory Revision Session I
    Optional Theory Revision Session II
    Optional Theory Revision Session III
    Practical
    Tutorial or other activity
    *Optional teaching week
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Task Type Hurdle Weighting
    Practical Assessment Summative

    No

    20%
    Tutorials Summative No 10%
    Theory tests Summative No 30%
    Final Exam Summative No 40%

    Assessment Detail
    Assessment Task Type of assessment Percentage
    of total assessment for grading purposes
    Hurdle
    (Yes/No)
    Practical Assessment Summative 20% No
    Tutorials Summative 10% No
    Theory tests Summative 30% No
    Final Exam Summative 40% No

    The assessment methods used for this course are designed to test development of various Bachelor of Science graduate attributes. The components of assessment used are:

    Practical assessment: 20%

    This summative and formative activity will assist students to develop an understanding of the observational and experimental character of science, to value the close relationship between scientific research and development of new knowledge, develop practical laboratory skills, appreciate the need for experimental design, develop skills to interpret raw experimental data. The practical exercises are designed to develop teamwork, objective criticism and high level numerical and computing skills. The skills to effectively communicate the outcomes in written and oral reports is a significant part. The laboratory exercises will give students opportunity to learn skills made available by new technologies. The practicals include laboratory based exercises, computer based exercises to develop data handling skills, use of online databases and bioinformatics applications, and online journal and abstracting systems for preparation of review style reports. The practicals are assessed by a combination of written reports and oral presentations.

    Tutorials: 10%

    All tutorials are compulsory. The aim of tutorials is to develop a student’s knowledge, scientific curiosity for microbiology and an appreciation of the role of microbiology for society and the environment. The tutorials are designed to reinforce lectures, assist students to develop a deeper understanding of the theory, allow students to explore the use of experimental methods to test hypotheses. Assessment of tutorials is by a mix of multiple choice question sets, short answer questions and evaluation of student performance in discussion.

    Theory Tests: 30%

    This summative assessment activity will address the learning outcomes (objectives) for theory delivered in the first term of the semester. One test will be scheduled at the end of Term 1 and the other at mid-Term 2. Test formats will be published in advance and may comprise multiple choice question sets, questions requiring one or two sentence answers or short answer questions designed to test understanding and application of the theory component of the course are used. Feedback on test outcomes is used to assist students to address learning difficulties, to refine frameworks for communication of scientific information and problem solving.

    End of Semester Exam: 40%

    This summative assessment activity will comprehensively address the learning outcomes (objectives) of this course. This assessment uses a mix of multiple choice question sets, brief answer questions (requiring at most 1 or 2 sentences to answer), short answer questions (10 minute questions requiring answers of about 1 page of written material) to test student comprehension of the theory part of the course. In particular, the 10 minute short answer questions are used to test ability to apply the theory to solve practical problems, and development of logical thought within the framework of the scientific method.
    Submission

    If an extension is not applied for, or not granted then a penalty for late submission will apply. A penalty of 10% of the value of the assignment for each calendar day that is late (i.e. weekends count as 2 days), up to a maximum of 50% of the available marks will be applied. This means that an assignment that is 5 days or more late without an approved extension can only receive a maximum of 50% of the mark.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.