PHYSIOL 2510 - Physiology IIA: Heart, Lung & Neuromuscular Systems

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2021

Physiology is the study of the function of the human body. This course is designed to develop critical skills and provide a foundation in human physiology with an emphasis on homeostasis and human performance. The major lecture topics covered are cellular physiology, neuromuscular physiology, and the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Topics include the cellular basis of sensation and neural communication, the control of movement, and how the cardiovascular and respiratory systems adapt in normal conditions and during challenges such as exercise and stress. In the practical laboratory sessions, students undertake a human-based project aligned with each of the subject areas that involves gathering physiological data and interpreting and analysing that data. The practical component is supported by on-line material that leads to a deeper understanding of research methods, ethical considerations, experimental techniques, and data processing in scientific research.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code PHYSIOL 2510
    Course Physiology IIA: Heart, Lung & Neuromuscular Systems
    Coordinating Unit Medical Sciences
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 9 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites ANAT SC 1102 or (CHEM 1100 and CHEM 1200) or (CHEM 1101 and CHEM 1201) or (BIOLOGY 1101 and BIOLOGY 1201)
    Assumed Knowledge 6 units of Level I Chemistry or Biology
    Course Description Physiology is the study of the function of the human body. This course is designed to develop critical skills and provide a foundation in human physiology with an emphasis on homeostasis and human performance. The major lecture topics covered are cellular physiology, neuromuscular physiology, and the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Topics include the cellular basis of sensation and neural communication, the control of movement, and how the cardiovascular and respiratory systems adapt in normal conditions and during challenges such as exercise and stress. In the practical laboratory sessions, students undertake a human-based project aligned with each of the subject areas that involves gathering physiological data and interpreting and analysing that data. The practical component is supported by on-line material that leads to a deeper understanding of research methods, ethical considerations, experimental techniques, and data processing in scientific research.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Associate Professor Elizabeth Beckett

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 Explain the function and control of the following areas of physiology:- cellular basis of neuromuscular physiology; skeletal muscle organisation and function; nervous system control of voluntary movement; the cardiovascular system and the respiratory system.
    2 Apply knowledge of physiological systems and their control to develop understanding of select real-life health and medical situations.
    3 Describe contemporary approaches and techniques used to advance physiological knowledge.
    4 Work effectively as part of a group to help answer questions and communicate findings.
    5 Gather, analyse and evaluate data relevant to physiological concepts and systems using appropriate methods.
    6 Apply knowledge of sound experimental design (including use of controls and appropriate statistical analysis) to help answer physiological questions.
    7 Communicate physiological concepts and research findings in an appropriate written scientific format.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1-7
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    2-7
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    4, 7
    Career and leadership readiness
    • technology savvy
    • professional and, where relevant, fully accredited
    • forward thinking and well informed
    • tested and validated by work based experiences
    3-7
    Intercultural and ethical competency
    • adept at operating in other cultures
    • comfortable with different nationalities and social contexts
    • able to determine and contribute to desirable social outcomes
    • demonstrated by study abroad or with an understanding of indigenous knowledges
    4, 6
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    4
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    One of the following textbooks is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED:

    Sherwood, Human Physiology: From Cells to Systems (7th edition – 9th edition) Cengage

    OR

    Silverthorn, Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach (4th edition – 6th edition) Pearson

    The publishers of these textbooks offer both electronic and hardcopy versions of these texts.

    Additional course materials and assessment activities will be provided on-line (via MyUni)
    Recommended Resources
    Individual lecturers within the course will direct students to the appropriate textbook sections and additional resources to support the
    content of their lectures.

    Course materials (or appropriate references) will be accessible via MyUni course pages. Links to additional library resources (including scientific databases such as Pubmed and Medline) will be available via the MyUni course pages in addition to ethics, statistics and referencing information.

    Information Technology Services:
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/its/

    MyUni support tutorials for students:
    http://www.adelaide.edu.au/myuni/student/tutorials/
    Online Learning
    The following course materials will be provided online via MyUni:
    - Course timetable (including both lecture and practical times)
    - Lecture notes - Lecture recordings (audio and video where appropriate)
    - Links to recommended readings
    - Ethics resources and guides
    - Data analysis and statistics resources

    The following course assessment activities will be provided online via MyUni:
    - Online research methods quizzes
    - Formative revision quizzes
    - Pre-practical quizzes

    Students can obtain information regarding marks obtained for assessment items via Gradebook on MyUni
    https://myuni.adelaide.edu.au
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course will be delivered using the following modes:
    - Lectures (up to 25; delivered online or face to face depending on instructor)
    - Revision lectures / open office sessions (approx 4)
    - Practicals (4 x 4hr sessions)
    - Online workshops and quizzes
    (Note: Research methods quizzes are summative; Revision quizzes are formative)
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students engage appropriately with the course and its requirements.

    Students are reminded that the overall predicted workload for a full time student is an average of 48 hours per week per teaching semester. This includes contact and non-contact hours and includes general study and time to complete assignments.

    As PHYSIOL IIA: Heart, Lung & Neuromuscular is a 3 unit course then it is expected that you spend approximately 12 hours per week studying this course (including contact hours).  

    The table below gives a suggestion as to how you may divide your time between the various learning activities - bearing in mind that
    this can be flexible depending on each student's individual learning methods.


    CONTACT
    Number of sessions Duration of each session (hrs) Total hours (hrs/semester)
    Lectures 24 1 24
    Practicals 4 4 16
    Revision sessions / open office 3 or 4 1 up to 4
    In-class exams 2 1 2
    NON-CONTACT Number  Expected preparation time (hr) Total hours (hrs/semester)
    Preparation for practicals 4 4 16
    Weekly review of lecture material and associated reading 12 3 36
    Online readings and quiz completion 2 5 10
    Exam preparation 4 10 40

    Total workload (hrs/semester): 148
    Expected workload/week (hrs): 12.3 (over 12 weeks); 11.4 (over 13 weeks)
    Learning Activities Summary
    An up-to-date timetable of course activities can be downloaded from MyUni.

    The course is organised into 4 teaching modules, with in-class and end-of-semester examinations to test comprehension of theory concepts. In-class exams will contribute to the final course grade (16% for each exam) and therefore it is important that students factor these examination sessions into their schedules.  Timetable conflict overrides cannot be granted for examination sessions.

    Online research methods activities are to be completed by the end of week 4 in preparation for laboratory practical sessions
    which will commence in week 5 or Week 6 (depending on students enrollment choices).  The aim of practical sessions is to provide
    application to the theoretical knowledge gained in lectures, demonstrate concepts and hone students teamwork and research skills.

    As the practical sessions will relate closely to the material delivered in lectures it is imperative that students stay 'up-to-date' with the
    course content as the semester progresses.  Practical sessions will be of greatest benefit to those who have already familiarised themselves
    with the main concepts delivered via lecture sessions.
    Specific Course Requirements
    For practicals close-toed shoes must be worn.

    Absence from a practical class or in-class exam will require the provision of appropriate paperwork documenting medical and/or compassionate reasons for non-attendance at the relevant session (Students are advised to consult the appropriate sesions on the MyUni course pages to determine the exact documentation required to be applicable for a replacement assessment).
    Small Group Discovery Experience
    Physiology IIA: Heart, Lung & Neuromuscular provides opportunity for a small group discovery experience through the practical
    component of the course. Each practical group of 4-5 students works together with an assigned demonstrator (often a post-doctoral fellow or academic staff member).  Students are able to discuss the hypothesis being addressed, their research ideas and experimental results with their peers and staff in a small group setting.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Assessment Type Weighting Learning Outcome(s) being addressed
    Revision quizzes
    Formative 0% 1, 2
    Online research methods quizzes Summative (individual) 6% 3, 5, 6
    In-class Exam 1 Summative (individual) 16% 1, 2
    In-class Exam 2 Summative (individual) 16% 1, 2
    Pre-practical quiz Summative (individual) 4% 1, 5, 6
    Practical worksheets Summative (group) 20% 1, 4-7
    Integrative Physiology Exam Summative (individual) 23% 1-3
    Research Skills Exam Summative (individual) 15% 5-7


    Assessment Related Requirements
    Students should be aware that they are required to attend both in-class exams (In-class exam 1 and In-class exam 2).  Failure to attend these exams will result in forfeiting the marks assigned to these assessment activities.  The course timetable available on MyUni will clearly indicate the dates and times these examinations will take place.  If attendance at an in-class exam is missed due to severe medical or compassionate circumstances, students will be required to apply for a replacement assessment using the appropriate university application form, with the relevant sections completed by a health professional.  It should be noted that, in line with University regulations, students will not be granted a replacement exam if they have already attended the original examination session.

    IMPORTANT: In order to pass Physiology IIA: Heart, Lung & Neuromuscular students are required to attain an overall grade of 50% AND achieve a composite score of 50% in the theory component of the course (composite score of in-class and end-of-semester module exams).

    In circumstances where students do not meet this barrier but  satisfactorily pass the practical component, the course coordinator may
    use their discretion to permit students repeating course in the following year to be exempt from the practical sessions. In this
    instance satisfactory achievement in the practical component is defined as attaining at least 40% in the end-of-semester research skills exam.

    Absence from a practical class will require the provision of appropriate paperwork documenting medical and/or compassionate reasons for non-attendance at the relevant session.

    Assessment Detail
    Theory examinations (55% of total course grade) 
    The theory component of PHYSIOL IIA is split into 3 separate exams. The first two exams (In class exams 1 & 2), each 50 minutes in duration, will examine material covered in lecture blocks 1-4. Each in class exam will be weighted 16% of the total course grade. During the end of semester university examination period students will sit an integrative physiology exam which contributes 23% of the total course grade.  Students must achieve at least 27.5 out of 55 total exam marks (50% in exams) in order to pass the course.

    Individual practical assessments (25% of total course grade) 
    - Online research methods quizzes (6%) - These online activities are designed to reinforce and promote understanding of concepts delivered through online practorial presentations on research ethics and statistics. The two quizzes each contribute 3% to the total
    course grade.
    - Pre-practical quizzes (4%) – Prior to each practical session students are asked to read pre-practical reading material and complete a short quiz.  This will help introduce and/or reinforce the concepts that will be covered in the practical sessions.
    - Research skills exam (15%) – This exam, also conducted during the end-of-semester examination period, will provide students an opportunity to demonstrate mastery of concepts from the on-line research methods quizzes and practical classes (including ethical considerations, data presentation and analysis.

    Group practical assessments (20% of total course grade)
    Practical worksheets (20%) - Practical worksheets have been designed to guide students through a series of research experiments to study a particular physiological concept, or mechanism.  By working through practical worksheets students will answer questions and complete activities designed to challenge students to consider the underlying physiological mechanisms. Each student group (4-6 students per group) will complete a worksheet for each of the 4 practical sessions, each weighted at 5% of the total course grade.
    Submission
    Submission process/requirements
    Group practical worksheets should be submitted online (in the correct pdf format) by the end of the scheduled practical session. 
    Further information regarding the submission of practical worksheets will be provided during the practical sessions.

    Penalties for late submission
    On-line quizzes (and associated materials) will be made available on MyUni at least one week in advance of the quiz deadline. Late submissions are not accepted and will not receive a score. Extensions or supplemental assessments will not be provided for on-line quizzes unless there are exceptional extenuating circumstances (at the discretion of the course coordinator). Late submissions of any additional assessment items (individual or group) shall be governed according to the Adelaide Medical School late submission policy. This policy will be enforced strictly throughout the course.

    Practical attendance requirements to attain practical group marks
    If a practical is missed due to a medical or exceptional circumstance a Practical Absence Form (available on MyUni course pages) must be
    completed and submitted to the course coordinator (along with appropriate supporting documentation) within 5 days of the missed practical if an opportunity to participate in an alternative practical assessment is to be considered.  Failure to submit a completed and signed Practical absence form will result in forfeit of the group worksheet mark for that particular practical class.  

    Staff “turn-around” timeline on assessments (including exam results)
    Wherever possible, staff will endeavour to have assignments and/or examinations marked and grades submitted within two weeks of the submission/examination deadline.

    Provision of feedback to students
    PHYSIOL IIA contains multiple assessment tasks that are set, submitted, marked and returned to students within two weeks of submission/completion. Module lecturers will provide feedback on revision study questions in revision lectorials and open office sessions. If used appropriately, formative revision quizzes and study questions have also the potential to provide feedback to students on their grasp of concepts covered in lecture sessions.

    Replacement examinations
    Students missing in-class examinations due to medical/compassionate circumstances will be provided with the opportunity to sit replacement examinations at a later date. Applications for replacement examinations will only be considered if the necessary application form (provided on MyUni course pages) has been appropriately completed and submitted to the course coordinator within 5 working days of the original examination date.  Students missing end-of-semester examinations due to medical/compassionate circumstances will be provided with the opportunity to sit replacement examinations at a later date. Applications for replacement examinations will only be considered if the necessary application form has been appropriately completed and submitted to the Faculty of Health & Medical Sciences Assessment Team within 3 working days of the original examination date.

    Additional examinations / Academic supplementary examinations
    As multiple exam papers (and associated medical replacement exams) are set for this course, additional examinations (formerly known as academic supplementary examinations) are generally NOT offered to students who fail the course due to a failure to meet a composite score of 50% in theory examinations (even if the overall course grade >50%)
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

    Examinations are held during teaching weeks (in-class) and during the end-of-semester university examination period.  Dates and times of in-class exminations will be provided at the start of the semester and students are expected to be available to sit both in-class exams and the end-of-semester exam held during the official university examination period. Students who fail to sit exams on the set date and time without satisfactory medical or compassionate reasons submitted in writing in the appropriate time frame, will forfeit the marks for these examinations.

    Student requests for replacement in-class examinations are to be directed to the course coordinator using the University application for replacement examination due to a medical or compassionate circumstances. Only one sitting for replacement assessment is offered and students who are present at the original exam are not applicable to apply for a replacement assessment.

    Examinations WILL NOT be rescheduled for students on holidays or away attending weddings etc. Information provided in applications for replacement/additional assessments or extensions for assignments will be treated in confidence.
  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    SELTs will be used to evaluate the PHYSIOL IIA course on a yearly basis. The results will be compared with benchmarks established in the Faculty of Health & Medical Science and aggregate reports throughout the University.

    Feedback provided via eSELTs have led to a number of important and beneficial PHYSIOL IIA course modifications and therefore student input is encouraged and highly valued.
  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.