ENV BIOL 2503 - Zoology II

North Terrace Campus - Semester 1 - 2019

The course begins with the relationship between structure and function. Concepts of phylogeny will be introduced and the enormous diversity of animals will be examined in a phylogenetic framework. The major event in animal evolution as demonstrated by adaptations to parasitism, the marine environment and life on land will be provided. The section on invertebrate diversity will be concluded with a state-of-the-art lecture on the extraordinary discoveries that are currently being made of new species and even new groups and how scientists determine where they fit in the tree of life. The biology of the vertebrates will follow groups from fishes to terrestrial vertebrates, including the amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. We will flavour these with interesting lectures on animal adaptations and some of the major evolutionary hurdles in vertebrate evolution. Topics in animal physiology relevant to both vertebrates and invertebrates will include the flow of energy through organisms, the process of respiration and the function of the nervous and sensory systems as well as muscle function.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code ENV BIOL 2503
    Course Zoology II
    Coordinating Unit School of Biological Sciences
    Term Semester 1
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 6 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Incompatible ENV BIOL 2530
    Assumed Knowledge BIOLOGY 1101 or BIOLOGY 1401 & BIOLOGY 1201 or BIOLOGY 1202 or BIOLOGY 1001
    Course Description The course begins with the relationship between structure and function. Concepts of phylogeny will be introduced and the enormous diversity of animals will be examined in a phylogenetic framework. The major event in animal evolution as demonstrated by adaptations to parasitism, the marine environment and life on land will be provided. The section on invertebrate diversity will be concluded with a state-of-the-art lecture on the extraordinary discoveries that are currently being made of new species and even new groups and how scientists determine where they fit in the tree of life. The biology of the vertebrates will follow groups from fishes to terrestrial vertebrates, including the amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. We will flavour these with interesting lectures on animal adaptations and some of the major evolutionary hurdles in vertebrate evolution. Topics in animal physiology relevant to both vertebrates and invertebrates will include the flow of energy through organisms, the process of respiration and the function of the nervous and sensory systems as well as muscle function.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Associate Professor Jeremy Austin

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    A successful student in this course should be able to:
    1 Understand the diversity and evolutionary relationships among animals
    2 Explain the basic structure and function of different groups of invertebrates and vertebrates
    3 Identify common organisms to broad groups (e.g. Phyla)
    4 Explain the mechanical function of the skeleton
    5 Describe principles of gas exchange and energetics of animals
    6 Synthesise and evaluate information from readings to write an essay
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1-6
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    1-6
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    6
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources

    Text book: Hickman CP, LS Roberts, SL Keen, A Larson, DJ Eisenhour. 2012. Animal Diversity. 6th ed. McGraw-Hill. (Editions 4 and 5 may be available second hand)

    Recommended Resources
    Laboratory coats and closed shoes are compulsory in practical sessions.
    Online Learning
    Additional resources (e.g. further reading material) will be provided in lectures and on MyUni. The Discussion Board (in My Uni) will be used for general questions and interaction.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    This course consists of:
    • 3 X 1-hour lectures per week (31 in total)
    • 1 X 3-hour practicals for 5 weeks
    One of the lectures is a tutorial covering essay writing. The two self-directed learning exercises relate to rocky reef marine invertebrates and the other a backyard arthropod exercise, which form part of the course and should be undertaken in students own time. The rocky reef marine invertebrates one may be undertaken in groups of up to 4 people. All other assessment items should be done individually. In addition, there are five weeks of laboratory practical classes. The essay, self-directed learning exercises and practicals build on material covered in lectures.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    A student enrolled in a 3 unit course, such as this, should expect to spend, on average 12 hours per week on the studies required. This includes both the formal contact time required for the course (e.g., lectures and practicals), as well as non-contact time (e.g., reading and revision; self-directed learning exercises and essay).


    Learning Activities Summary
    Schedule
    Week Lecture Lab Class
    Week 1 1-3. Diversity, life histories, body plans; Cnidarians & Molluscs Practical 1. Introduction to Microscopy & Scientific Illustration
    Week 2 4-6. Colony forming organisms: Cnidarians & mollsucs continued. Form and function in animals Practical 2. Molluscs: squid dissection
    Week 3 7-9. Worms; essay topic & essay writing; Arthropods, crustaceans No practical
    Week 4 10-11. Chelicerates & Myriapods; No lecture Friday No practical
    Week 5 12-14. Insects; Annelids No practical
    Week 6 15-17. Echinoderms, Chordates, Diversity of fishes Practical 3. Insect adaptive radiation & diversity
    Week 7 18-20. Origins of tetrapods, amphibians, amniote origins, origins of birds & mammals No practical
    Week 8 21-23. Origins of birds and mammals continuted; bird diversity, mammal diversity Practical 4. Vertebrate evolution
    Week 9 24-26. Mammal diversity continued; vertebrate research workshop, locomotion in vertebrates No practical
    Week 10 27-28. Bioenergetics and homeostasis in vertebrates; animal nutrition, circulation & gas exchange; No lecture Friday Practical 5. Functional Morphology of Vertebrates
    Week 11 29-30. Feeding & digestion in vertebrates; Australian birds and mammals. No lecture Friday No practical
    Week 12 31. Essay feedback & exam information; No lecture Wednesday or Friday No practical
    Specific Course Requirements
    This may include specific requirements such as field trips. All requirements must comply with the relevant policies.
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment taskType of assessmentPercentage of total assessment for grading purposesHurdle (Yes/No)Outcome assessed/achievedApproximate Timing of Assessment
    Mollusc Practical Formative/Summative 5% No 1-3 Week 2
    Functional morphology of vertebrates prac Formative/Summative 10% No 2, 4, 5 Week 10
    Self-directed field exercise: rocky reef marine
    invertebrates & arthropods in your backyard
    Formative/Summative 20% No 1-3 Weeks 6, 7
    Essay Formative/Summative 25% No 1, 2, 3, 6 Week 9
    Theory Exam Summative 40% No 1-5 Exam Period
    Assessment Related Requirements
    Students will be required to submit their work for the practicals which are formally assessed at the completion of the practical, e.g. Mollusca and Functional Morphology, or show their work to either the academic in charge of the practical or the demonstrator and have them sign off that it has been satisfactorily completed (e.g. Microscopy, Insects, Vertebrate evolution).


    Assessment Detail

    Practical reports (total of 15% of course grades)

    Two practical reports are to be handed up for assessment: the mollusc practical (5%) at the end of each practical; and the functional morphology prac (10%) which should also be handed up at the end of the practical.

    Self-directed field exercises (total of 20% of course grades)

    There are two self-directed field exercises each worth 10% each that students should complete in their own time. One is related to rocky reef invertebrates and the other to backyard arthropods. Both will expose students to a diversity of organisms, allow them to use a variety of methods for observing/collecting organisms and help them to collate observations and information related to different organisms. The rocky reef invertebrates one may be completed in groups of up to 4 people - it should be submitted electronically through the My Uni groups function. The backyard arthropods one should be completed individually and handed into the UG teaching lab staff.

    Essay (total of 25% of course grades)

    A 1500-2000 word essay forms part of the assessment. Further details on the essay topic and guidelines for writing essays including information on the format and style will be provided in the tutorial. The essay should be submitted electronically through TURNITIN.
    Requirements for the essay should be guided by Margaret Cargill & Patrick O'Connor (2009) Writing Scientific Research Articles: Strategy and Steps. Wiley-Blackwell.

    Exam (total of 40% of course grades)

    The final assessment component involves a two-hour exam (40% weight) drawing on lectures, the textbook and practical work. Further details on the format of the exam and types of questions will be provided in the final lecture.

    Submission

    Late submission of assessments

    If an extension is not applied for, or not granted then a penalty for late submission will apply. A penalty of 10% of the value of the assignment for each calendar day that is late (i.e. weekends count as 2 days), up to a maximum of 50% of the available marks will be applied. This means that an assignment that is 5 days or more late without an approved extension can only receive a maximum of 50% of the mark.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

The University of Adelaide is committed to regular reviews of the courses and programs it offers to students. The University of Adelaide therefore reserves the right to discontinue or vary programs and courses without notice. Please read the important information contained in the disclaimer.