PHYSICS 2520 - Physics IIB

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2019

This course provides an introduction to condensed matter physics, progresses from the level I introduction to optical physics and continues the development of practical problem solving using laboratory experiments. Optics: -ray tracing; ABCD matrix method; cardinal points; optical aberrations and wavefront distortion; interferometry; polarisation and Jones matrices; Gaussian beams. Condensed Matter Physics: -introduction to crystal structures, lattices and bonding; atomic vibrations in crystals and phonon zones, free-electron gas model of metals; nearly-free electron model and band theory; semiconductor crystals; PN Junctions; diodes. Practical work includes laboratory experiments in optics, properties of solids and instrumentation.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code PHYSICS 2520
    Course Physics IIB
    Coordinating Unit School of Physical Sciences
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 7 hours per week
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange Y
    Prerequisites PHYSICS 2510, MATHS 2102 or MATHS 2201, - Other students may apply to Head of Physics for exemption
    Incompatible PHYSICS 2525
    Assumed Knowledge MATHS 2101, MATHS 2202
    Course Description This course provides an introduction to condensed matter physics, progresses from the level I introduction to optical physics and continues the development of practical problem solving using laboratory experiments.
    Optics: -ray tracing; ABCD matrix method; cardinal points; optical aberrations and wavefront distortion; interferometry; polarisation and Jones matrices; Gaussian beams.
    Condensed Matter Physics: -introduction to crystal structures, lattices and bonding; atomic vibrations in crystals and phonon zones, free-electron gas model of metals; nearly-free electron model and band theory; semiconductor crystals; PN Junctions; diodes.
    Practical work includes laboratory experiments in optics, properties of solids and instrumentation.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Professor Peter Veitch

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1. demonstrate an understanding of the propagation of light through paraxial optical systems and interferometers
    2. demonstrate an understanding of the polarisation of light and changes to the polarisation state as it propagates through optical systems;
    3. describe the structure of and bonding in crystalline solids, the nearly-free-electron model and band theory;
    4. demonstrate an understanding of doped semiconductors and abrupt PN semiconductor junctions
    5. solve simple physics problems at a level appropriate to the course content;
    6. make appropriate decisions about the experimental uncertainty associated with every measurement, and analyse uncertainties correctly;
    7. keep a scientific record of experimental work;
    8. analyse the results of experiments and reach appropriate conclusions about them;
    9. work effectively in a small team to complete a complex set of tasks.
    10. communicate results orally and in writing
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Deep discipline knowledge
    • informed and infused by cutting edge research, scaffolded throughout their program of studies
    • acquired from personal interaction with research active educators, from year 1
    • accredited or validated against national or international standards (for relevant programs)
    1-8
    Critical thinking and problem solving
    • steeped in research methods and rigor
    • based on empirical evidence and the scientific approach to knowledge development
    • demonstrated through appropriate and relevant assessment
    4,8,10
    Teamwork and communication skills
    • developed from, with, and via the SGDE
    • honed through assessment and practice throughout the program of studies
    • encouraged and valued in all aspects of learning
    9-10
    Self-awareness and emotional intelligence
    • a capacity for self-reflection and a willingness to engage in self-appraisal
    • open to objective and constructive feedback from supervisors and peers
    • able to negotiate difficult social situations, defuse conflict and engage positively in purposeful debate
    9-10
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources

    Serway, R.A., Moses, C.J. and Moyer, C.A., Modern Physics (3rd ed.) (Thomson)

    Pedrotti F.L., Pedrotti L.M. and Pedrotti L.S., Introduction to Optics (3rd ed.) (Prentice Hall)

    Recommended Resources

    Kittel C., Introduction to Solid State Physics (Wiley)

    Sreetman B.G. and Banerjee S., Solid State Electronics Devices (Pearson)

    Bernstein, J., Fishbane, P. M. and Gasiorowicz, S. Modern Physics (Prentice Hall)

    Fowles, G., R. Introduction to Modern Optics (2nd ed.) (Dover)

    Online Learning

    MyUni: Teaching materials and course documentation will be posted on the MyUni website (http://myuni.adelaide.edu.au/).

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    This course will be delivered by the following means:

    • Lectures 30 x 50-minute sessions with up to three sessions per week
    • Tutorials 11 x 50-minute sessions with one session per week
    • Practicals 6 x 4-hour sessions with one session per week for 6 weeks
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    A student enrolled in a 3 unit course, such as this, should expect to spend, on average 12 hours per week on the studies required. This includes both the formal contact time required to the course (e.g., lectures and practicals), as well as non-contact time (e.g., reading and revision).

    Learning Activities Summary

    The course content will include the following:

    Coursework Content

    • Geometric Optics (14 lectures)
      • Ray tracing, ABCD transfer matrices and Cardinal points in paraxial optical systems
      • Aberration theory and wave-front distortion in optical systems
      • Interference, Michelson, Mach-Zehnder and Fabry-Perot interferometers, thin-film interference, multilayer dielectric coatings, antireflection coatings
      • Polarization, Jones vectors and Jones matrices
    • Condensed Matter (16 lectures)
      • Crystal Structure; lattices, cubic crystal structure.
      • Atomic vibrations in crystals, phonons, transport properties.
      • Free-electron theory of metals.
      • Nearly-free-electron model of semiconductors; energy band structure and band-gaps; metals, semiconductors and insulators; direct and indirect band-gaps.
      • Doped semiconductors, abrupt PN junctions, PN diodes.
    • Practical work (6 sessions)
      Experiments carried out in groups of two students, selected from
      • Cardinal points of a lens system
      • Holography
      • Polarization of light
      • Curie temperature
      • Thermal diffusivity of copper
      • Exponential decay and luminescence in solids
      • X-ray diffraction
  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment taskType of assessmentPercentage of total assessment for grading purposesHurdle (Yes/No)Outcomes being assessed
    Practical work Formative & Summative 18% No 6 – 10
    Tutorial preparation Formative & Summative min 5% - max 10% No 1 – 5, 10
    Tests Formative & Summative min 5% - max 13% No 1 – 5, 10
    Final exam Summative min 59% - max 72% Yes (40%) 1 – 5, 10
    Assessment Related Requirements

    To obtain a grade of Pass or better in this course, a student must maintain a suitable logbook for at least 5 practical sessions during the semester, attend the examination and achieve at least 40% in the final exam.

    Assessment Detail

    Tests
    2 x 50 minute, closed book tests taken during the semester, which have a formative and summative role and address essential aspects of the learning objectives for Optics and Condensed Matter Physics. The combined mark for both tests can contribute up to 13% to the final assessment; poor performance may be partly redeemed by superior performance in the final exam.

    Tutorial preparation
    To maximise the benefit of tutorials, students are required to submit their answers before or at the tutorial. Assessment is based on effort rather than correctness; this task has a formative and summative role. It can contribute up to 10% to the final assessment; poor performance may be partly redeemed by superior performance in the final exam.

    Final exam
    This summative assessment activity comprehensively addresses learning objectives 1 – 10.

    Practical work (Practical achievement and practical reports)
    Students work on an experiment until it is completed and they have an adequate report in their log book. Demonstrators provide formative assessment as the students are doing each experiment. Each student then selects one completed experiment and writes an extended lab report. The log book and report are assessed summatively. An opportunity to make-up a maximum of one missed practical session may be offered at the end of the semester.

     

    Submission

    Submission of Assigned Work
    Coversheets must be completed and attached to all submitted work. Coversheets can be obtained from the School Office (room G33 Physics) or from MyUNI. Work should be submitted via the assignment drop box at the School Office.

    Extensions for Assessment Tasks
    Extensions of deadlines for assessment tasks may be allowed for reasonable causes. Such situations would include compassionate and medical grounds of the severity that would justify the awarding of a replacement examination. Evidence for the grounds must be provided when an extension is requested. Students are required to apply for an extension to the Course Coordinator before the assessment task is due. Extensions will not be provided on the grounds of poor prioritising of time. 

    Late submission of assessments
    If an extension is not applied for, or not granted then a penalty for late submission will apply. A penalty of 10% of the value of the assignment for each calendar day that is late (i.e. weekends count as 2 days), up to a maximum of 50% of the available marks will be applied. This means that an assignment that is 5 days or more late without an approved extension can only receive a maximum of 50% of the mark.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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