ANAT SC 2501 - Comparative Anatomy of Body Systems II

North Terrace Campus - Semester 2 - 2014

This course studies structure and the basic functions of the body systems of vertebrates (i.e. cardiovascular, respiratory, musculoskeletal, digestive, reproductive, urinary and nervous systems), with special focus on how the structure has adapted in response to the functional requirements of the different habits and habitats (i.e. way of life and environment). Mammalian body systems are taught with reference to human systems. The course consists of lectures (3 per week) and practicals (1 per week), in practicals, human and animal bones, dissected bodies or body parts will be used. In addition, animals (i.e. different vertebrate groups) will be dissected to learn the comparative anatomy of body systems. This course has been recognised as part of the selection process for entry to certain courses, such as postgraduate medicine.

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code ANAT SC 2501
    Course Comparative Anatomy of Body Systems II
    Coordinating Unit Anatomy and Pathology
    Term Semester 2
    Level Undergraduate
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Up to 6 hours per week
    Incompatible ANAT SC 2008
    Assumed Knowledge BIOLOGY 1202 or equivalent
    Restrictions Available to B Sc, B.Art/B Sc students only
    Course Description This course studies structure and the basic functions of the body systems of vertebrates (i.e. cardiovascular, respiratory, musculoskeletal, digestive, reproductive, urinary and nervous systems), with special focus on how the structure has adapted in response to the functional requirements of the different habits and habitats (i.e. way of life and environment). Mammalian body systems are taught with reference to human systems. The course consists of lectures (3 per week) and practicals (1 per week), in practicals, human and animal bones, dissected bodies or body parts will be used. In addition, animals (i.e. different vertebrate groups) will be dissected to learn the comparative anatomy of body systems. This course has been recognised as part of the selection process for entry to certain courses, such as postgraduate medicine.
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Dr Jaliya Kumaratilake

    Course Coordinator: Dr Jaliya Kumaratilake
    Phone: +61 8 8313 5478
    Email: jaliya.kumaratilake@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology, Room N125, North Wing, Medical School

    Lecturer: Professor Maciej Henneberg
    Phone: +61 8 8313 5479
    Email: maciej.henneberg@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology

    Lecturer: Professor William Breed
    Phone: +61 8 8313 5743
    Email: bill.breed@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology

    Lecturer: Dr Christopher Jones
    Phone: +61 8 8313 4526
    Email: christopher.jones@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: Discipline of Anatomy and Pathology

    School Office
    Phone: +61 8 8313 4533
    Email: kathryn.nehme@adelaide.edu.au
    Location: School Office, School of Medical Sciences
    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes
    1 Understand the basic concepts associated with each system of the body.
    2 Identify structures that are in place in the body systems to perform the functions according to the habits or habitats of the animals.
    3 Understand how the components of the body systems evolved when the animals moved from one habit and/or habitat to another to meet the requirements of the new environment.
    4 Examine a body part and identify it and then state to which animal/animal group it belongs to.
    5 Describe the basic structure and functioning of the body systems of different animal groups living in different habitats or with different habits.
    6 Demonstrate basic dissection skills.
    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1, 3, 5
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 3, 4
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 2, 4, 5
    Skills of a high order in interpersonal understanding, teamwork and communication. 6
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 2, 6
    A commitment to continuous learning and the capacity to maintain intellectual curiosity throughout life. 3
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 1, 2, 4
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources
    Textbook – Vertebrates, Comparative anatomy, Function, Evolution; K.V. Kardong, 5/6 edition, dissecting instruments, lab-coats, safety glasses.
    Recommended Resources
    Textbooks, dissecting instruments, lab-coats, safety glasses.
    Online Learning
    Students are provided via MyUni lecture notes, lecture presentations, audio recordings of lectures, auodio-visual recordings of lectures, practical guides, dissection guides, pass examination papers and e-tests. In addition, when required students are contacted and also provide with additional informations via MyUni.
  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes
    Lectures are supported by practicals and dissection projects. Practicals and dissection projects are extensions of the lectures for students to learn and consolidate the knowledge of the materials they learned during the lectures. In practicals students get the opportunity to learn by handling and dissecting of real specimens (i.e. bones, prosections and dissections). Practicals are run like small-group practical-tutorials.
    Workload

    The information below is provided as a guide to assist students in engaging appropriately with the course requirements.

    3X1 hour lectures and a three hour practical per week. In addition 2-3 hours of learning/preparation per week.
    Learning Activities Summary

    Week

    Topic

    Lecture

    Week 1

    Introduction

     



    Embryology

    Introduction to the course
    Introduction to comparative anatomy
    Systematics of vertebrates
    Principles of the evolution of vertebrates

    Embryonic development of body systems

    Week 2

    Musculoskeletal system

     

     

    Embryology                                      

    Axial skeleton and trunk muscles
    Limbs and locomotion
    Musculoskeletal adaptations to various life-styles

     

    Practical-tutorial - embryology

    Week 3

    Vertebrate skull

     

     

    Musculoskeletal system

    Mammalian skull and head: Basic anatomy
    Evolution of vertebrate skull
    Comparison of mammalian skulls

     

    Practical-tutorial – musculoskeletal system
    e-test – musculoskeletal system

    Week 4

    Vertebrate skull and dentition

     

     

    Digestive system

     

    Comparative anatomy of mammalian skulls

     

    Musculoskeletal system

    Vertebrate teeth: Evolution of the mammalian molar, dental adaptations to diet.
    Evolution of human skull and dentition

     

    Oral cavity

     

    Practical-tutorial – Comparative anatomy of mammalian skull

     
    e-test feedback – musculoskeletal system

    Week 5

    Digestive system

     

    Respiratory system



    Dentition

     

    Skull and dentition 

    Adaptation to diet
    Practical-tutorial – digestive system

     

    Aquatic vertebrates
    Origin of lung

     

    Practical-tutorial – Dentition

     

    e-test – Skull and dentition
    e-test feedback – skull and dentition

    Week 6

    Respiratory system

     

     

    Cardiovascular system

     

     

    Digestive system

    Terrestrial adaptations 

    Practical-tutorial and dissection project

     

    Comparison of arterial and venous systems between groups of vertebrates
    Evolution of aortic arches

     

    Practical examination (spot test) – digestive system
    Feedback – Digestive system spot test

    Week 7

    Cardiovascular system

     

     

     

    Urinary system

    Evolution of vertebrate heart
    Structure and function of mammalian heart

     

    Practical-tutorial and dissection project

     

    Mammalian kidney and its embryonic development

     

    Week 8

     

    Urinary system

     

     

     

    Integument

     

     

    Dissection evaluation

     

    Phylogeny

     

    Practical-tutorial and dissection project

     

    Integument 1
    Integument 2

     

    Evaluation of the dissections and feedback on dissection projects.

     

    Week 9

    Nervous system

    General introduction to brain, cranial and spinal nerves.
    Meninges and comparative anatomy of Cerebra hemispheres.
    Speech, limbic system and diencephalon.

    Week 10

    Nervous system

    Midbrain, hindbrain, autonomic nervous System.
    Comparative anatomy of sensory systems.

    Practical-tutorial

    Week 11

    Nervous system

     

    Genital system

    Practical examination – spot test

     

    Comparative anatomy of the male gonads, genital ducts, and external genitalia of vertebrates.
    Comparative anatomy of female gonads, genitals, ducts and external genitalia of vertebrates.
    Evolution of adaptation to viviparity.
    Fertilisation and early embryonic development.

    Week 12

    Genital system

     

     

     

     


    Nervous system


    Paleontology

    Comparative placental structure and function in mammals.
    Embryology – formation of general body form.

    Practical-tutorial

    Feedback – nervous system spot test.

     

    Lecture by a visiting Scientist 

    Week 13

    Genital system

    Test – e-test.

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary
    Assessment Task Assessment Type Weighting Learning Outcome(s) being addressed
    Musculoskeletal e-test Summative 4% 1-3
    Skull and dentition e-test Summative 4% 1-4
    Digestive system spot test Summative 4% 1-5
    Respiratory system – dissection project Summative 5% 1, 2
    Circulatory system - dissection project Summative 7% 1, 2
    Urinary system – dissection project Summative 4% 1, 2
    Evaluation of dissection Summative 4% 6
    Nervous systme spot test Summative 4% 1-5
    Genital system e-test Summative 4% 1-5
    End of the Semester theory paper Summative 60% 1-5
    Assessment Detail

    1)   Musculoskeletal system e-test – students do the test electronically, outside the scheduled University learning time, marked by the lecturer, marks and feedback presented to students via MyUni.

    2)   Skull and dentition e-test – students do the test electronically, outside the scheduled University learning time, marked by the lecturer, marks and feedback presented to students via MyUni

    3)   Digestive system spot test – This is a spot test, where each station is given 2-3 minutes. In each station, real specimens or photographs of specimens are used. Marks are presented in MyUni, Feedback given via MyUni and during subsequent practical students are given the opportunity to review their answer books and the feedback is given. Number of stations in the test depends on the number of students enrolled in the course.

    4)   Respiratory system, dissection project – A group of 4-5 students dissects a Koala according to the instructions provided and then each student draw and labels the dissection. The drawing is used for the assessment. Marks are presented via MYUni and in a subsequent practical session students are given the opportunity to review their drawings and the feedback is given.

    5)   Circulatory system, dissection project – A group of 4-5 students dissects a Koala according to the instructions provided and then each student draw and labels the dissection. The drawing is used for the assessment. Marks are presented via MYUni and in a subsequent practical session students are given the opportunity to review their drawings and the feedback is given.

    6)   Urinary system, dissection project – A group of 4-5 students dissects a Koala according to the instructions provided and then each student draw and labels the dissection. The drawing is used for the assessment. Marks are presented via MYUni and in a subsequent practical session students are given the opportunity to review their drawings and the feedback is given.

    7)   Evaluation of dissections – The dissection of each group is evaluated and a mark given. The marks are presented via MyUni.

    8)   Nervous system spot test – This is a spot test, where each station is given 2-3 minutes. In each station, real specimens or photographs of specimens are used. Marks are presented in MyUni, Feedback given via MyUni and during subsequent practical students are given the opportunity to review their answer books and the feedback is given. Number of stations in the test depends on the number of students enrolled in the course.

    9)   Genital system e-test - students do the test electronically, outside the scheduled University learning time, marked by the lecturer, marks and feedback presented to students via MyUni.

    Submission
    Any potential difficulties in meeting assessment deadlines should be discussed with the course coordinator. Extensions for due dates will only be granted in accordance with University of Adelaide policy. http://www.adelaide.edu.au/student/exams/supps.html
    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

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    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

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