PETROENG 7051 - Formation Damage and Productivity Enhancement

North Terrace Campus - Winter - 2015

The course covers formation damage in injection and production wells, its prediction, mathematical and laboratory modeling, prevention and mitigation. The oil-production processes covered are injectivity decline, re-injection of produced water, invasion of drilling fluid, sand production, gravel pack, sand screens, fines migration, disposal of produced water, IOR. The physics phenomena caused damage include deep bed filtration, external filter cake formation, precipitation of salts, ashpaltenes and paraffines, fines migration and liberation, rock deformation and compaction, two-phase flow of suspensions and colloids. Cases of vertical, horizontal, fractured and perforated wells are discussed. Techniques of damage removal and well stimulation are presented. The lectures are accompanied by numerous training exercises and field examples

  • General Course Information
    Course Details
    Course Code PETROENG 7051
    Course Formation Damage and Productivity Enhancement
    Coordinating Unit Australian School of Petroleum
    Term Winter
    Level Postgraduate Coursework
    Location/s North Terrace Campus
    Units 3
    Contact Intensive short course of lectures, seminars
    Available for Study Abroad and Exchange N
    Prerequisites MATHS 1011, MATHS 1012
    Course Description The course covers formation damage in injection and production wells, its prediction, mathematical and laboratory modeling, prevention and mitigation. The oil-production processes covered are injectivity decline, re-injection of produced water, invasion of drilling fluid, sand production, gravel pack, sand screens, fines migration, disposal of produced water, IOR. The physics phenomena caused damage include deep bed filtration, external filter cake formation, precipitation of salts, ashpaltenes and paraffines, fines migration and liberation, rock deformation and compaction, two-phase flow of suspensions and colloids. Cases of vertical, horizontal, fractured and perforated wells are discussed. Techniques of damage removal and well stimulation are presented.
    The lectures are accompanied by numerous training exercises and field examples
    Course Staff

    Course Coordinator: Professor Pavel Bedrikovetski

    Course Timetable

    The full timetable of all activities for this course can be accessed from Course Planner.

  • Learning Outcomes
    Course Learning Outcomes

    1.   Understand key aspects of formation damage in different processes of oil production.

    2.   Explain reservoir physics of main formation damage mechanisms.

    3.   Describe the purpose of damage removal, prevention and mitigation, of well stimulation.

    4.   Understand the concepts and equipment required for water management in onshore and offshore developments.

    5.   Analysis of mathematical models for formation damage in different processes of oil production (waterflooding, pressure
          depletion, EOR).

    6.   Describe the applicability of different mathematical models of formation damage

    7.   Explain the process and importance of injected water treatment.

    8.   Utilise knowledge of formation damage reservoir physics in design of damage-free oil production technologies.

    9.   Describe processes associated with formation damage in injection and production wells and its uses in exploration and
          production.

    10.  Apply a critical-thinking and problem-solving approach towards the principles of damage-free oil production technologies.


    University Graduate Attributes

    This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop the Graduate Attribute(s) specified below:

    University Graduate Attribute Course Learning Outcome(s)
    Knowledge and understanding of the content and techniques of a chosen discipline at advanced levels that are internationally recognised. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,10
    The ability to locate, analyse, evaluate and synthesise information from a wide variety of sources in a planned and timely manner. 1
    An ability to apply effective, creative and innovative solutions, both independently and cooperatively, to current and future problems. 2, 3, 4, 6, 9
    A proficiency in the appropriate use of contemporary technologies. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9,10
    A commitment to the highest standards of professional endeavour and the ability to take a leadership role in the community. 1, 9
    An awareness of ethical, social and cultural issues within a global context and their importance in the exercise of professional skills and responsibilities. 1, 9
  • Learning Resources
    Required Resources

    The following two texts are an integral work book and reference for this course;

    1. Civan, F.: Reservoir Formation Damage
    (Fundamentals, Modeling, Assessment, and Mitigation), Gulf Professional
    Publishing, 2nd ed (2007). Approximate cost = 150 US $

    2. Tiab, D. and Donaldson, E.C., 2004, Petrophysics,
    Gulf Prof Publishing, 2nd Ed. Approximate cost = 160 US $

    Recommended Resources

    Useful Reference Books

    ·        Schechter, R., 1987, Well stimulation, New Jersey, Prentice Hall, Engleswood, NJ, NY.

    ·        Khilar, K. and Fogler, S., 1998: Migration of Fines in Porous Media, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht/London/Boston

    ·        Bedrikovetsky P.G., 1993, Mathematical Theory of Oil & Gas Recovery (With applications to ex-USSR oil & gas condensate fields),
             Kluwer Academic Publishers, London-Boston-Dordrecht, 600 p.

    ·        Bedrikovetsky P.G., 1999, Advanced Waterflooding, Textbook, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark, 450 p.

    Additional lecture notes will be provided during the lecture.

    Online Learning

    PDF’s of lecture power points and additional material will be provided via MyUni

  • Learning & Teaching Activities
    Learning & Teaching Modes

    No information currently available.

    Workload

    No information currently available.

    Learning Activities Summary

    No information currently available.

  • Assessment

    The University's policy on Assessment for Coursework Programs is based on the following four principles:

    1. Assessment must encourage and reinforce learning.
    2. Assessment must enable robust and fair judgements about student performance.
    3. Assessment practices must be fair and equitable to students and give them the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned.
    4. Assessment must maintain academic standards.

    Assessment Summary

    No information currently available.

    Assessment Detail

    No information currently available.

    Submission

    No information currently available.

    Course Grading

    Grades for your performance in this course will be awarded in accordance with the following scheme:

    M10 (Coursework Mark Scheme)
    Grade Mark Description
    FNS   Fail No Submission
    F 1-49 Fail
    P 50-64 Pass
    C 65-74 Credit
    D 75-84 Distinction
    HD 85-100 High Distinction
    CN   Continuing
    NFE   No Formal Examination
    RP   Result Pending

    Further details of the grades/results can be obtained from Examinations.

    Grade Descriptors are available which provide a general guide to the standard of work that is expected at each grade level. More information at Assessment for Coursework Programs.

    Final results for this course will be made available through Access Adelaide.

  • Student Feedback

    The University places a high priority on approaches to learning and teaching that enhance the student experience. Feedback is sought from students in a variety of ways including on-going engagement with staff, the use of online discussion boards and the use of Student Experience of Learning and Teaching (SELT) surveys as well as GOS surveys and Program reviews.

    SELTs are an important source of information to inform individual teaching practice, decisions about teaching duties, and course and program curriculum design. They enable the University to assess how effectively its learning environments and teaching practices facilitate student engagement and learning outcomes. Under the current SELT Policy (http://www.adelaide.edu.au/policies/101/) course SELTs are mandated and must be conducted at the conclusion of each term/semester/trimester for every course offering. Feedback on issues raised through course SELT surveys is made available to enrolled students through various resources (e.g. MyUni). In addition aggregated course SELT data is available.

    Communication

    It is important that all students maintain active communication channels throughout the year. The primary communication channels to students in this course are as follows.

    MyUni:
    Students should regularly check the MyUni website (http://myuni.adelaide.edu.au/).

    Email:
    Each student should regularly check his or her University-provided email account (firstname.lastname@student.adelaide.edu.au) for information from members of the academic staff concerning course work matters and other announcements as they arise. Make sure you clean up your Inbox regularly as if it is full you will not receive our email! We will regard an email message being sent to your
    student email address or an announcement posted on the MyUni site as our having communicated with each member of the class. Not reading one’s University provided email or MyUni announcements will not be a valid excuse for missing important deadlines

  • Student Support
  • Policies & Guidelines
  • Fraud Awareness

    Students are reminded that in order to maintain the academic integrity of all programs and courses, the university has a zero-tolerance approach to students offering money or significant value goods or services to any staff member who is involved in their teaching or assessment. Students offering lecturers or tutors or professional staff anything more than a small token of appreciation is totally unacceptable, in any circumstances. Staff members are obliged to report all such incidents to their supervisor/manager, who will refer them for action under the university's student’s disciplinary procedures.

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